Headlines

3 years ago

Are you deserting Android for iPhone 4?

125

Android's ranks have grown over the past few months, that's for certain. We've bolstered our numbers with former members of the CrackBerry Nation, with iPhone faithful, the patient Palmsters and the long-suffering (OK, let's just call 'em "really, really patient") Windows Mobile users.

Any regrets? It stands to reason that one or two of you (and we know who you are) are going to defect back to the realm of Apple. And while we hate to see you do it (again, we know where you sleep), we'd like you to steer you away from some of the more nefarious sites out there, and instead point you toward our pals at TiPB, who have a handy guide for leaving the newest and greatest operating system and switching back to the OS that just got multitasking, doesn't let you have wallpaper and for whom tethering is still mainly a pipe dream. Anyhoo, check out TiPB's Guide for Switching from Android to iPhone 4. And tell 'em Android Central sent ya.

Are you deserting Android for the new iPhone?online survey

Read more and comment

 
3 years ago

Android quick app: SoundHound

29

There always comes a time when you hear a song, but can’t figure out the name of it, or who it’s by. Luckily, your Android phone’s got you covered. Simply open up SoundHound, press the big orange button and presto: you’re song, who it’s by, where to find it, videos, lyrics, and even a link to the Amazon MP3 file are all available at your fingertips. My personal favorite feature has to be the ‘Sing and Hum’ recognition which means if you can carry the tune, then SoundHound can recognize it – now that’s innovation! Another cool thing we liked was that it automatically saves any search you do within the app allowing for easy referencing if need be. Now, that’s a lot of features, and to put the icing on the cake, the company has just released a free version which gives you five “ID’s” to start with. If you feel like it, you can also earn more credits by Tweeting your songs, which we thought was pretty fair if you didn’t want to pay $4.99 for the premium version. After the break are some screenshots, so be sure not to miss them. Free version: [Market Link | AppBrain] Paid version: [Market Link | AppBrain]

Read more and comment

 
3 years ago

Wireless N support unlocked on the HTC Evo (unofficialy, of course)

20

That's more like it.  We know that the HTC Evo  does not have the best reputation when it comes to WiFi support.  That could very well be a thing of the past now that another of those HTC hacking geniuses has figured how to unblock 802.11 n support.  We're not even sure why support was disabled in the first place, as the same chip that supports wireless n on a Nexus One running Froyo is being used on the Evo (and the Incredible, and Desire), but it was.  Through some careful hex editing the driver was ripped apart and support for high throughput and better range that comes with wireless n was added back in. 

Speeds seem about the same (it is still a phone after all and we can only expect so much) but range and signal stability appears to be better, and my setup has it connected as a wireless n device.  I sure notice a difference in my recliner work chair, especially where stability is concerned.  Check out the source link and give it a try, it's a relatively painless operation and an easy roll back is provided as well.  [Xda-developers] Thanks Keith!

Read more and comment

 
3 years ago

Not so secret Droid X Twitter page found

11

 

Remember that slightly creepy Droid X commercial from this morning? It just got a little creepier, with a few backward subliminal messages tossed in -- including a Twitter account that you can follow, @DroidLanding. While it doesn't yet have any tweets, it appears as though what's to come could be worthy of a follow. One of the most interesting things shown on the site is the bio, which reads:

The next generation of does is coming soon, but you might get yours before that. Droid X phones are hidden across the country. Follow us for clues.

You may want to take 30 seconds to click that little follow button, the time could pay off for you. [via BerryScoop]

Read more and comment

 
3 years ago

HTC Aria available now on AT&T

5

 

AT&T's second Android phone, the HTC Aria, is now available for purchase. You can buy it direct from AT&T for $129.99 after $100 rebate, or you can find it other notable online sources for considerably less (read: free). While the specs on the Aria don't exactly match up with some of the newer phones we've seen, the results we've seen on benchmarks show that this phone is more than capable of holding its own. [AT&T wireless]

Read more and comment

 
3 years ago

Screen showdown -- AMOLED vs. LCD vs. SAMOLED in direct sunlight

16

AMOLED screens look amazing, whether the 3.5 inch variety or something a little bigger like the new breed of television sets.  Their big letdown when compared to traditional LCD displays has been the washed out hazy look when viewed in direct sunlight.  Samsung has been touting the virtues of Super AMOLED ever since we first had a chance to see the Galaxy S at MWC, saying that the newer generation will be much more readable in the sun.  No, we still haven't been able to get our hands on one to test it ourselves, but you lucky folks across the pond have had the Galaxy S for a few days now, and we finally get to see a matchup of what's currently available in the Android phone screen department.

In the picture above you're looking at (from left to right) the Galaxy S (Super AMOLED), an HTC Desire (AMOLED), and the SE X10 (LCD) all lined up and under the hot Greek sun. Easy to see that the Super AMOLED screen really outshines its older cousin the AMOLED display, and looks to match up really well against the LCD screen.  To be honest, I still would rather not have to work with any of these in the sun, but it's nice to know that I could -- but only if I had a Super AMOLED or LCD display.  Really shows the Achilles heel of AMOLED screens when you line them up like that.   We also have a video after the break if you need a bit more proof that Super AMOLED delivers on the promises. [TechBlog (in Greek) via Engadget]

Read more and comment

 
3 years ago

U.S. Cellular getting Samsung Acclaim on July 9

0

After first being spotted in May, U.S. Cellular has gone and made the Samsung Acclaim all official, with the regional carrier selling the mid-level phone in stores starting July 9. They're also giving away 10 of the phones (you must have had your account since before May 31), so be sure to hit them up for that, too. [Facebook] Thanks to everyone who sent this in.

Read more and comment

 
3 years ago

Droid X video high on tease, creepiness

28

Yeah, this Motorola Droid X video's a tad creepy (and doesn't actually show the phone), but it's also getting to be a little tough to contain our excitement. Peep it after the break. (Thanks to everyone who sent this in.)

Read more and comment

 
3 years ago

Barnes & Noble Nook gets Wifi-only version, lowers 3G price

12

If you've been looking to get into the Android-based e-reader game but haven't been to crazy about the price, you're starting to run out of excuses. The Barnes & Noble Nook line just got a refresh, with a Wifi-only version going for $150, and the 3G/Wifi original down to $199. Same e-ink reader display coupled with a bottom color panel, same book library. And a much lower price.

And on top of that, there's a software update for you current Nook owners. You can snag version 1.4 now at nook.com/update, or wait for it to be pushed out to your device. [Barnes & Noble]

Read more and comment

 
3 years ago

Nexus One, Legos, Adobe AIR and slot-car racing

7

Somebody's about to win the science fair. Using a Nexus One, some Legos, rubber bands and an Adobe AIR application, an Android phone is converted into a high-tech gas pedal for slot-car racing. How's it work? Grant Skinner explains:

To summarize: The generic mobile client connects over the LAN to the desktop app. The desktop app sends it a "surface" SWF which contains all of the graphics and logic for the interaction (allowing the host to dictate the experience). The mobile client then sends accelerometer data to the host, which interprets the data, and sends back commands to update the client UI. The host communicates with a Phidgets motor controller, which controls the speed of the cars. And yes, it supports multiple connections (limited to 2 in this case because that's how many cars I have).

Oh. So you push the petal down and the cars go? We can handle that. Check out video of the project after the break, and make sure your kids aren't watching  -- they're going to want this. [GSkinner.com via DailyMobile.se] Thanks, Daniel!

Read more and comment

 
Show More Headlines

Pages