Adobe Air

Adobe has announced that the AIR runtime for Android, as well as the SDK tools and components will soon be updated to work on Android x86. This means that all the Intel Atom tablets we'll be hearing about in 2014 can run applications built using Adobe Air, and they can be installed and updated like any other app right from Google Play. The new runtime will soon be available for download from Google Play, and the SDK components are headed to Adobe Labs soon. Expect the final version in the next major release of the SDK from Adobe.

Source: Adobe

 

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Adobe to update AIR runtime and SDK components for Android x86

11 Comments

Exactly, what's the purpose of this? I refused to update when the new permissions were about determining my location and finding accounts on my device. For what!? They think because it's "Adobe" they can be trusted. Yeah right.

Posted via Android Central App

What does AIR even really do? I tried to find out but all I got were parody answers. The closest thing I found out was that it's used to run "many" games but to my knowledge that's a blatant lie.

Posted from my Motorola Moto G

Guys, AIR is a runtime environment. The platform allows developers to create applications (mostly games) using Flash (amongst other technologies) and run them on a desktop as well as Android or iOS - but the runtime needs to be installed on the device/computer first (just like you need Flash Player on a PC to use Flash content).

If you don't use any applications that use AIR, there is no point at all in having it installed.

Posted via Android Central App

Could developers use unity instead of Adobe Air or does a Adobe Air do different things?

Posted via Android Central App

I don't know a ton about Unity but they do different things - Unity is a game engine whereas AIR could be used for anything - a game engine could be used with AIR though, such as Starling.

If Unity was used to create a game, it could be presumably deployed on Android as a completely native app, so no runtime would be required.

Posted via Android Central App

Okay that clears up a lot of questions. I'm pretty sure nobody develops for mobile in Flash, rendering AIR a mostly useless platform.

Posted from my Motorola Moto G

Boy are you wrong though, Johnny Blake.

Air, containing Flash technology, is one of the most used cross platform technologies making apps today, covering both Android and iOS.

There's a ton of games and apps made in Air now.
Remember Farmville? Made in Air. Angry Birds? Also Air.

Pretty known games if you ask me.