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2 days ago

Tesla's Desktop Supercharger is the desk charger your phone deserves

20

Tesla's Desktop Supercharger and Powerbank are expensive, but boy do they look good.

Tesla recently held an event in New York City to announce its all-new semi truck and updated Roadster 2.0, and if you're still riding the Tesla high after reserving a couple Roadsters for the cool price of $50,000 each, the company now has a couple of mobile accessories so you can show off your Tesla pride wherever you go.

Tesla Desktop Supercharger

The first, and arguably best, accessory is the Desktop Supercharger. This is an exact replica of the Superchargers that Tesla uses to charge up its vehicles, but it's been shrunken down to fit on your desk and charges your phone rather than your car. The same 3D CAD data that's used to manufacture that real Superchargers was used to create this model, and even if you don't own a Tesla like me, you've got to appreciate the sleek design of the thing.

Tesla Powerbank

In addition to the Desktop Supercharger, you can also buy Tesla's Powerbank. This is a portable charger with a 3350 mAh capacity, outputs at 5V/1.5A for fast top-up times, and has integrated lightning and microUSB cables. The Powerbank's design is based off Tesla's Supercharger monument found at the Tesla Design Studio, and while the price is pretty high considering the mAh count and lack of USB-C, it also looks wickedly good.

Both the Desktop Supercharger and Powerbank cost $45, and if you're interested, you can buy them from Tesla's website right now.

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2 days ago

Gear S3 gets Tizen 3.0 update with enhanced UI, fitness tracking, and more

49

Tizen 3.0 is available to download now through the Samsung Gear app on your phone.

Samsung's Gear S3 was widely considered to be one of the best smartwatches around when it debuted in late 2016, and that's a point that's still often associated with it to this very day. Tizen 3.0 is now being rolled out to the Gear S3 as part of Samsung's "Value Pack Update", and there's a lot that's included with it.

Tizen 3.0 ships on the Gear Sport out of the box, so while the features here aren't entirely new, they are things we haven't yet seen on its older brother. One of the biggest improvements with the 3.0 update is an even heavier focus on fitness tracking. With Tizen 3.0, you can use the Gear S3 to continuously monitor your heartbeat with improved accuracy, add food eaten throughout the day to keep track of calories, and use Samsung's Health Fitness Program that allows you to control workout videos on your smart TV and even see your heart rate in real-time on the big screen.

If fitness tracking really isn't your thing, the update also allows you to now create contacts and events right on your watch, view and edit checklists, as well as edit how often you're notified of web and video reminders.

The UI as a whole retains the same look, but there are a few smaller updates that make interacting with it all the more enjoyable. Widgets have been reworked to showcase more information on the Gear S3's circular display, rotating the bezel quickly will allow you to see more options at once when changing your watch face, and you can go from a text message notification right to the reply field by just rotating your bezel as well.

Top this off with the ability to reorder apps based on how recently they've been used, swipe up or down from any screen to access the new Moment Bar, and a more modern look for the companion Samsung Gear app on your phone, and you're looking at a lot of new goodies.

Samsung's Value Pack Update with Tizen 3.0 is available to download now through the Samsung Gear app.

Samsung's Gear Sport is currently the best alternative to Android Wear

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3 days ago

Amazon releases a (RED) Echo to help fight AIDS

10

Echo in (RED).

The second-generation Amazon Echo speaker was released earlier this year with an updated fabric design, featuring different color options than the original Echo.

As CNET reports, Amazon is releasing a red variant of the smart speaker in order to help raise money for AIDS research.

Amazon has recently partnered with (RED) on a number of products and is pledging portions of sales toward (RED)'s fight against AIDS. Amazon will give $10 for ever red Echo sold between now and December 31, 2017. Bank of America will also give 30 cents for every dollar spent on Amazon's (RED) product line during the same period, up to $1.5 million (U.S. sales only).

You can preorder the red Echo now and it's the same price as its charcoal, gray, and sandstone line mates, at $99. The red Echo will be released on December 6, but all proceeds starting now are considered for Amazon's donation.

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Amazon Echo

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3 days ago

Qualcomm might sell to Broadcom if share prices are raised to $80

8

An increase of $10-per-share from Broadcom could result in a deal with Qualcomm actually going through.

At the beginning of this month, a report came to light that Broadcom was interested in buying Qualcomm for $105 billion. Qualcomm's Board of Directors rejected this deal a little over a week later, but since then, it now looks like the offer could come back into consideration – if the price is right.

According to a new report from Bloomberg, Qualcomm's investors will sell to Broadcom if the offer of $70-per-share is increased to at least $80.

When Qualcomm rejected Broadcom's offer on November 13, Executive Chairman and Chairman of the Board, Paul Jacobs, said that Broadcom's initial offer "significantly undervalues Qualcomm relative to the Company's leadership position in mobile technology and our future growth prospects." In other words, if Broadcom offers more money, we might have a deal after all.

Broadcom's current CEO is Hock Tan, and throughout his professional life, he's proven to be a pretty tough negotiator. The last three company's than Tan helped to complete deals on include LSI Corp, Broadcom Corp., and Brocade Communication Systems Inc. With all of these deals, the most Tan's ever gone over for his initial offer is 6.8-percent.

Hock Tan's never gone over 6.8-percent his initial offer when making similar deals in the past.

For example, when working out a deal with LSI, the company's CEO Abhi Talwalker asked for a 10-cents-per-share increase on what had been offered. In response to this, Tan wouldn't budge. Considering that Qualcomm is asking for $10 more per share, and its chances aren't looking too bright.

We've already made it clear a couple of times why we're against a deal between Qualcomm and Broadcom, so to know that one is still a possibility isn't the best way to start the week. We'll be following this story closely for any future updates, so stay tuned.

Braodcom buying Qualcomm could grind innovation to a screeching halt

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3 days ago

Best Cheap Android Phones of 2017

Best overall

Moto G5 Plus

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Motorola performed yet another pricing miracle with the Moto G5 Plus, the successor to last year's excellent Moto G4 series and a contender for the best affordable smartphone today.

It starts with the excellent 5.2-inch Full HD display, but the real benefit to the G5 Plus this year is the excellent performance and battery life from the combination of a Snapdragon 625 platform and a 3000mAh battery.

Also of note is the improved low-light performance from the 12MP camera, which boasts the same hardware as (and similar results to) the Galaxy S7.

Bottom line: This is the best sub-$250 phone you can buy today, and it's still a great device even if price isn't a factor.

One more thing: Motorola.com is offering the Moto G5 Plus with inexpensive financing if you don't want to pay up front.

Why the Moto G5 Plus is the best

Last year, we recommended the $199.99 Moto G4 over its $249.99 Plus variant, but this year the only distinction is between memory and storage amounts: the Moto G5 Plus comes in either a $229.99 2GB RAM / 32GB storage version, or a $299.99 4GB RAM / 64GB storage version — they are otherwise identical.

With either decision, you'll be happy with your purchase. Motorola has changed up the phone's design this year, adding a metal back and a more compact, mature look that complements the Moto Z series, and the excellent 5.2-inch IPS display is much more manageable in one hand. Also more manageable is the improved shape of the front fingerprint sensor, which is turned oblong and considerably easier to activate.

Motorola has also bestowed a fantastic camera on the Moto G5 Plus this year, giving it the same 12MP sensor and lens combination that's in the Galaxy S7 — though the results aren't quite as good. The phone isn't perfect — there's no NFC on the U.S. model, and it still uses the older Micro-USB charging port — but it's close.

And if you buy it through Amazon, you can save $45 on the base model, bringing it down to $184.99!

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Best all-metal

Honor 6X

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The Honor 6X replaces its predecessor the 5X on this list. While you won't be blown away by magnificent design or all of the top-end features, the Honor 6X is an exercise in what you can get for about $200. You get a good enough screen, expandable storage and a fingerprint sensor, wrapped in a metal body that's better than the plastic offerings out there. There's also a neat dual camera setup around back that can take interesting-looking shots.

Sure it's stuck on Micro-USB and the software has yet to make the jump to Huawei's new EMUI 5.0 (and we can't wait for that to come), but you can't get that complete of a package in a phone this inexpensive.

Bottom-line: It doesn't offer everything, but it's a solid package for the money.

One more thing: The Honor 7X is coming soon, but the 6X is still a great deal, especially at a discount.

Best for even less

Moto E4

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The Moto E line has always been about getting a barebones smartphone experience in order to get a super low price, and that's where the Moto E4 still lands. The specs aren't amazing, nor is the physical design, but you get that core Moto DNA that means this is a slick little phone for a great price.

You get a 5-inch HD display, a Snapdragon 425 processor, and 2800mAh battery. But you also get nice-to-haves at this price, like an 8MP auto focus camera and a fingerprint sensor.

It all retails for just $129 brand new, and it's tough to argue with that. Amazon has a Prime Exclusive version for $99, and Verizon's prepaid service charges just $70 for this phone — both are a steal of a deal.

Bottom-line: For a bargain basement price, it's tough to get a phone that performs better or has the features of the Moto E4.

One more thing: Be on the lookout for better deals and sales — this is a phone that will be discounted regularly to entice budget buyers.

Best for battery

Moto E4 Plus

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Whereas you get a lot for your money with the Moto E4, its Plus variant is only slightly more expensive and gives you a bigger screen, slightly more power and, best of all, a massive 5000mAh battery that lasts, well, forever.

Aside from that two (or three) day battery life, you get a decent 13MP rear camera, a nice 5MP front-facing camera with a flash, and Motorola's excellent Android software. The phone is available for a reasonable $139.99 through Amazon's Prime Exclusive series, but its $179.99 MSRP isn't bad, either.

Bottom-line: The Moto E4 Plus is one long-lasting candy handset. Expect two or three days on a single charge.

One more thing: It's compatible with all four major U.S. carriers, including Verizon and Sprint.

Best in Europe

Wileyfox Swift 2 X

See at Amazon

The Wileyfox Swift 2 X is the British company's latest budget phone, an update to the previous Swift 2. You're getting a 5.2-inch 1080p display in a solid body, filled with surprisingly good specs: a Snapdragon 430, 3GB of RAM, 3010mAh battery with Quick Charge, 16MP camera, fingerprint sensor, NFC and dual SIMs.

At £219 the Swift 2X competes nicely with the other budget offerings from Moto, while offering a bit more hardware style and a different software experience. You get a clean version of Android 7.1.1 here, and Wileyfox has historically been surprisingly good with software updates as well.

Bottom-line: For those in Europe looking something a little nicer than a Moto G4 Play, with a fresh software experience, the Swift 2 X is a good choice.

One more thing: Don't be tempted by the cheaper Wileyfox models. The Swift 2 X is the only one we recommend.

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Conclusion

If you don't want to spend over $250 and still want a great Android phone, the Moto G5 Plus is the best choice. You don't get the best looking or feeling phone, but it offers a top-notch experience, especially for the price.

Best overall

Moto G5 Plus

See at Amazon

Motorola performed yet another pricing miracle with the Moto G5 Plus, the successor to last year's excellent Moto G4 series and a contender for the best affordable smartphone today.

It starts with the excellent 5.2-inch Full HD display, but the real benefit to the G5 Plus this year is the excellent performance and battery life from the combination of a Snapdragon 625 platform and a 30000mAh battery.

Also of note is the improved low-light performance from the 12MP camera, which boasts the same hardware as (and similar results to) the Galaxy S7.

Bottom line: This is the best sub-$250 phone you can buy today, and it's still a great device even if price isn't a factor.

One more thing: Motorola.com is offering the Moto G5 Plus with inexpensive financing if you don't want to pay up front.

Best Android phones under $400
Best Android phones under $100

Updated November 2017: These are still the best cheap phones you can buy.

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3 days ago

Anker's Zolo Liberty wireless earbuds now available for $99

9

In the Bluetooth headphone/earbud market, completely wireless solutions like Apple Airpods and Samsung's Gear IconX are all the rage. There are a lot of companies trying their hand in this area, and Anker is the latest to do so with its recently released Zolo Liberty earbuds.

The Zolo Liberty buds feature a design that's pretty commonplace these days for truly wireless earphones. You have two individual earbuds that aren't connected by any wires, and when you're not using them, you can store/charge them in the included carrying case. The buds themselves should get you around 3.5 hours of use per charge, and the case allows for 24 hours of stamina before you'll need to dig out the included microUSB charger.

The Liberty+ costs $50 more and comes with 48-hour battery life and Bluetooth 5.0.

Anker is promoting a tight seal in your ears with the Zolo Liberty, and this should allow for excellent bass and great sound-isolation. The Push And Go system creates for a simplified pairing process, and tapping the earbuds will bring up Anker's Smart AI that you can use to talk to either Alexa or Siri.

One thing to keep note of is that these are not the Zolo Libery+ earbuds that Anker launched on Kickstarter this past June. The Liberty and Liberty+ are very similar to one another, but the latter offers 48 hours of battery with the charging case and Bluetooth 5.0 compared to Bluetooth 4.1 on the regular model.

If a bigger battery and newer Bluetooth standard aren't important to you, however, you can buy the Zolo Liberty on Amazon right now for $99.

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3 days ago

Android color management: Everything you need to know

26

Color is complicated, but Oreo might be able to help.

There has been a lot of talk about color management here and elsewhere on the internet lately. Android Oreo provides new support for color management, the Pixel 2 XL has a reputation for doing it poorly, and these two things combined make us want to talk about it. But, what exactly does color management mean?

Let's talk about that and a bit about how and why it's used, and maybe even some more cool stuff.

What is color management?

Don't laugh, but you have to understand just what color is based on the way our eyes see it before you talk about how our gadgets try to do it right.

Color is easiest described as the result of Hue, Saturation, and Brilliance.

Light emits energy over specific bands or wavelengths, but our eyes can't see most of them. This is known as spectrum. Terms like IR (infrared, or longer wavelengths than the red end of the spectrum we can see) and UV (ultraviolet, shorter than the blue wavelengths we can see) are real and there is plenty of science about measuring their intensity but they don't have anything to do with color because color is a human thing.

In those wavelengths of light that are visible, Hue is the point where a band has the most energy, Saturation defines the bandwidth (where the emission of light begins on the spectrum and where it ends), and Brilliance is the intensity of a human-visible light wave. Hue defines what color our eyes will see, Saturation defines the purity of it, and Brilliance defines its brightness. Charts help, so here's one.

This is the type of light that a plant can't use for photosynthesis. This is why plants are mostly this color — they reflect this light!

In this chart, red, green and blue all have approximately the same hue — they peak around 450 - 550 nanometers. Red has the most bandwidth (it covers more spectrum) so is less saturated than blue which has the least amount of bandwidth. All three colors have a very high brilliance where they peak, so they are equally intense. Our eyes interpret this as a muddy ugly yellow color. All colors created in red, blue, and green will have their own spectrum profile just like ugly-yellow does.

The color on your TV and the color on your phone and the color from your camera all need to match.

RGB stands for red, green, and blue. It's an additive model to create color, where light in each spectrum is emitted to create the color. If you have a color inkjet printer (remember those?) it creates a color using cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK) as a subtractive model, where colors are applied so that the light reflected from a surface is a specific color. RGBA (the A is for Alpha and determines the level of transparency) is the model used on a display to produce a color, no matter what type of display is being used.

The color produced by a printer using the CMYK model and color produced on your phone's screen using the RGBA model have to appear the same to our eyes — red needs to look red.

This is color management in its most basic form.

Actual color management

There are a lot of different ways to "create" color. We looked at the HSB, RGB, and CMYK models above, but there are a lot of other ways to try and represent what the output of a light source looks like to our eyes. They were all designed so that pink looks pink, green looks green, orange looks orange, and so forth. We can get a good basic idea of what color is trying to be represented by any color model in any medium. But a basic idea just isn't enough.

Doing something is not the same as doing it well, and that goes for color management, too.

The spectrum of colors is nearly infinite, and when you are using something capable of displaying more than a handful of them you need a way to make sure a particular shade of green looks the same to a person's eyes no matter where it's being displayed or what model is being used to create it. When you're dealing with the millions of different colors a modern electronic display can show, a good method to reproduce the correct color becomes very important.

You need a good screen

You start with the display itself. Any good high-end display needs to be able to reproduce a Wide Color Gamut. There are standards from the ITU-R (International Telecommunication Union - Radiocommunications Sector) that decides what a wide color gamut is, and they involve a lot of math and science. Thankfully, we don't need to do the math and only need to know what color spaces meet the standards. For our phones, that's usually the DCI-P3 color space.

This matters more now that displays can show more colors.

The ill-fated Galaxy Note 7 is listed as the first phone to ship with a 100% DCI-P3 HDR display, but since we've seen DCI-P3 capable displays from plenty of companies. The iPhone 7 and newer ship with one, the OnePlus 5 and up have one, the HTC U11+ and the Pixel 2 XL and more all have 100% compliant DCI-P3 displays. This means that the screen can reproduce colors correctly and accurately to meet the ITU-R standards.

Then you calibrate it

Once you use the right hardware, calibration comes into play. Calibration is measuring the output of a display as it reproduces different colors and adjusting the hardware so that the readings meet a specific value. Because it's impossible to calibrate 16.7 million different colors, common colors spaces are used. The most common is sRGB (standard Red Green Blue).

Developed by HP and Microsoft, sRGB is the standard on monitors, printers and the internet when no specific color space is defined, and it's a very good standard. Calibrating for sRGB is fairly easy because you adjust with one channel at a non-zero value and the other two at zero and cycle through. That's why you'll see 255,255,255 expressed for a color (that one is white) or 255,0,0 (that's red). Once the chromatic of each primary channel is calibrated, every other color will be, too.

Ideally, this is what every company making a display does then it ships the display out the door.

Before Oreo, color management on Android was broken

The problem is that some companies using Wide Color Gamut displays would stretch the sRGB space and reinterpret the color values into their own unique gamut. This makes the three primary channels very oversaturated, which in turn means that every one of the 16.7 million colors the display was capable of showing was no longer calibrated to look the same on any other device.

There are many color spaces and profiles. The one most important to Android is sRGB.

Before Android Oreo, applications used the sRGB color space. There's a reason for this — low-end hardware. Displaying a wide color gamut takes more GPU and CPU power than the sRGB space. If Android were set up with a wide color space as the default, some of the phones people are buying would struggle to display it. Even if a phone's display wasn't even capable of showing all the colors, there's still a fairly large performance hit.

Manufacturers of high-end devices felt that "breaking" color calibration and processing color with their own values would showcase their superior displays, and if there's one thing I've learned doing this job for almost eight years is that a phone manufacturer only cares about what's best for itself.

Some apps still need to show mostly accurate color, even when a manufacturer breaks the color space, so developers had to desaturate their assets to try and compensate. A video, for example, looks best when a red stop sign is the same red you recognize it as and not a random color that a manufacturer decided it should be. Once you introduce a device with a 100% DCI-P3 display calibrated for the sRGB color space, things start to look broken. This is the crux of the issues surrounding the "muted" colors on the Pixel 2, though some experts say the calibration is not very accurate from unit to unit.

Here's how it gets fixed

Proper Wide Color Gamut support makes this particular Pixel 2 XL and the Note 8 display this image the same on both screens.

This is the simple part and probably should have been done from the very beginning. A developer can detect if a device is using a Wide Color Gamut display and have an activity inside of the application use the correct color space to make the most of it. If the device is not capable of displaying wide color, the default sRGB profile is used.

Google has provided plenty of assets for developers who want to follow the new guidelines in their apps:

This is all well and good and should prove to be a great way to make sure that colors look the same from device to device unless it's a lower-end model incapable of displaying every color. Those would still look correct between devices because they would use the sRGB color space. The problem is getting everyone on board to do the same thing.

We're hopeful things will get better

For this to work, Samsung, OnePlus, LG and every other company that's "broken" the sRGB interpretation has to go back and correct it and developers need to rebuild their apps to support the new color space guidelines. And nobody wants to do it.

Companies won't likely change the way they do things until app developers make the apps that look good, and developers aren't going to write apps that will look broken on millions and millions of phones. Apple was able to transition to proper color management because it controls the hardware and software space, as well as set App Store guidelines. Google doesn't have that luxury.

Somewhere someone is thinking of the way to fix all of this. And shipping a broken user-selectable color space on Pixel 2 phones to compensate — well, that's not it. We know that everyone involved wants to do things the right way, and that also means not breaking anything on the phones that have already been sold. Hopefully, it gets sorted out sooner than later.

Android Oreo

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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3 days ago

Consolidate your remotes with a Harmony Companion for just $100

1

Control everything from one thing!

Is this deal for me?

Amazon has dropped the price on Logitech's Harmony Companion Remote down to $99.99, which is a savings of $50. This remote will allow you to leave behind the stack of remotes you currently use to control your TV, DVD player, cable box and home theater system, and use just one insteadl.

Feature include:

  • Works with Alexa for voice control. Performs activities like Lower the blinds, dim the lights, fire-up the TV for movie night—all with a tap of the finger.
  • Use your Smartphone (with available app) or included Harmony Remote for one-touch control of your entertainment system and home automation devices such as Philips Hue lights or Nest Learning Thermostat
  • Companion remote includes full featured home entertainment controls including dedicated home automation controls
  • Included Harmony Hub lets you control devices hidden behind cabinet doors or walls, including game consoles such as PS3, Wii, and Xbox 360
  • Simple setup on computer or the available smartphone app – works with over 270,000 devices, including your TV, satellite or cable box, blu-ray player, Apple TV, Roku, Sonos, game consoles, Philips Hue lights, and more

TL;DR

  • What makes this deal worth considering? - This isn't an all-time low on this remote, but it's the lowest we have seen in quite a while. It allows you to stop using 10 different remotes all the time and instead just use one.
  • Things to know before you buy! - If you want to take advantage of the Alexa features, you'll need an Alexa-enabled device. You can bundle the remote and an Echo Dot for just $30 more, which is an additional $20 in savings.

See at Amazon

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3 days ago

Intel's first commercial 5G modem, XMM 8060, is now under development

4

Intel is also working on the XMM 7660 for Cat-19 Gigabit LTE speeds up to 1.6 Gbps.

Qualcomm's been making huge strides in developing the 5G future lately, but it isn't the only company committed to this venture. Intel recently announced a couple new chips that it's currently working on, and the XMM 8060 – it's first commercial 5G modem – will be shipping out in just a couple of years.

The XM 8060 is the first addition to Intel's XMM 8000 series of modems, and it'll be able to support standalone and non-standalone 5G NR, 4G, 3G/CDMA, and 2G networks. Commerical devices that are based on the XMM 8060 should begin shipping in mid-2019, but as the XMM 8000 series grows, Intel will be able to integrate this power into smartphones, computers, vehicles, etc.

We won't see a full deployment of 5G networks until some point in 2020, so while we're waiting, Intel also announced that its XMM 7660 will be available for use in 2019. The XMM 7660 is a Cat-19 LTE modem, and it's capable of download speeds reaching as high as 1.6 Gbps. That's not as fast as what we'll be able to see with 5G, but it's considerably quicker than what current 4G LTE is capable of.

Intel's XMM 7660 is the successor to the XMM 7560 that was announced earlier this year, and Intel says that the XMM 7560 is currently being used and tested by smartphone makers with successful Gigabit-class speeds. A timeframe for its rollout isn't concrete quite yet, but commercial products should start shipping with it as soon as next year.

Qualcomm achieves first end-to-end 5G system based on 3GPP Standard

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3 days ago

Best Android Phone For Long Battery Life

Best overall

Huawei Mate 10 / Mate 10 Pro

See at Amazon (Mate 10)

Huawei's new flagship line, the Mate 10 series, packs 4,000mAh batteries and a 6-inch displays into devices that easily fits in the palm of your hand. That screen is helped along by a 4,000mAh battery — among the biggest in its class — pushing the Mate 10 Pro to a staggering 2-day average uptime per charge for most use cases. (Or guaranteeing you a full day whatever you're doing, for heavier users.) Huawei's flagship device also has some Machine Learning chops that learn what apps you use most and least, in order to optimize them for battery usage. And it's the first Android phone to ship with a Neural Processing Unit, meaning it's future-proofed for AI apps arriving in the coming year.

Besides strong battery life, both the Mate 10 and the Pro boast Android Oreo out of the box, and an excellent f/1.6 dual camera setup, co-developed with Leica.

Bottom line: A huge 4,000mAh cell plus software optimizations make the Huawei Mate 10 Pro the best phone for battery life.

One more thing: The Mate 10 Pro hasn't actually gone on sale just yet, but it's launching imminently in Europe, and a U.S. launch is expected in early 2018.

Why the Mate 10 Pro is the best

The best of the Huawei Mate series, now in a smaller package with a beautiful design.

Huawei has come a long way since its days of questionable software and China-only releases. You'll pay top dollar for Mate 10 Pro, but in exchange, you get a handset that combines high technology and good looks — including a 4,000mAh battery that has to be one of the best out there. The company's homegrown Kirin 970 chip is not only fast, but its 10nm manufacturing process makes it extremely efficient, and it's among the first to have AI hardware built in.

Combined with the power-sipping 1080p AMOLED panel, the Mate 10 Pro seemingly lasts forever; during our review period, it easily lasted through a busy day in London, with up to seven hours of screen-on time, and plenty of juice left in the evening for some night photography.

And that's another area of strength for the Mate 10 Pro — its camera is a close second to the Google Pixel 2 in synthetic rankings, and a really strong low-light performer.

Best for software + updates

Google Pixel 2 XL

See at Verizon See at Best Buy See at Google Store

The Pixel 2 XL is one of the best all-round Android phones, but one of its more overlooked strengths is battery life. With a 3,000mAh cell inside, and USB Power Deliver 2.0 for quick refills, the 2 XL offers strong longevity.

Other reasons to love the larger of Google's two 2017 Pixels? How about an excellent software experience, powered by Android Oreo, and just about the best camera we've seen in an Android phone.

Bottom line: Between a big battery, an efficient processor and Android Oreo's various enhancements, the Pixel 2 XL is easily an all-day phone.

One more thing: The miniature Pixel 2 also has pretty good battery life for its size, though not quite up to the level of the XL.

Best for hard workers

BlackBerry KEYone / BlackBerry Motion

See at Amazon (KEYone) See at Best Buy (KEYone)

The BlackBerry KEYone is, unsurprisingly, a workhorse. There's a lot going on beneath those classic BlackBerry keys, but the one thing you need to know is, like the others on this list, it pairs a massive battery — 3,500mAh — with an energy-sipping Snapdragon 625 processor. If you're longing for the good 'ol days of not having to charge your BlackBerry everyday, the KEYone fits the bill nicely.

Then there's the BlackBerry Motion, launching soon, which swaps out the physical keyboards, adds an extra gigabyte of RAM, and bumps up the battery to an even larger 4,000mAh cell.

Bottom-line: The KEYone is an exceptional phone with a near-perfect hardware keyboard and multi-day battery life. Don't want the keyboard? The Motion is a great all-touch alternative.

One more thing: There are two separate variants of the KEYone, one for AT&T and T-Mobile and another for Verizon, as well as the BlackBerry KEYone Black Edition, with 4GB of RAM. Choose wisely.

Conclusion

Most phones claim to have "all-day battery life," but few actually make it to bedtime. The Huawei Mate 9 actually backs up its claims, and does so while excelling in almost every other area.

Best overall

Huawei Mate 10 / Mate 10 Pro

See at Amazon (Mate 10)

Huawei's new flagship line, the Mate 10 series, packs 4,000mAh batteries and a 6-inch displays into devices that easily fits in the palm of your hand. That screen is helped along by a 4,000mAh battery — among the biggest in its class — pushing the Mate 10 Pro to a staggering 2-day average uptime per charge for most use cases. (Or guaranteeing you a full day whatever you're doing, for heavier users.) Huawei's flagship device also has some Machine Learning chops that learn what apps you use most and least, in order to optimize them for battery usage. And it's the first Android phone to ship with a Neural Processing Unit, meaning it's future-proofed for AI apps arriving in the coming year.

Besides strong battery life, both the Mate 10 and the Pro boast Android Oreo out of the box, and an excellent f/1.6 dual camera setup, co-developed with Leica.

Bottom line: A huge 4,000mAh cell plus software optimizations make the Huawei Mate 10 Pro the best phone for battery life.

One more thing: The Mate 10 Pro hasn't actually gone on sale just yet, but it's launching imminently in Europe, and a U.S. launch is expected in early 2018.

Update November 2017: The Mate 10 Pro is our new battery champ, with the Google Pixel 2 XL coming in second place, and a not to BlackBerry's new Motion handset, alongside the venerable KEYone.

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3 days ago

Get a Python Network Programming bundle for just $20

Python is one of the most widely used programming languages in the world, thanks to it being able to run on plenty of systems. In order to build, automate, and secure networks, Python is often used.

Those of you looking to break into the coding world, Python is a great place to start, thanks to it being so popular and so widely used. The world of Python is quite large, and focusing on a certain area is not a bad idea.

Right now, Android Central Digital Offers has a deal on a focused Python course that will help prepare you for a career in the field. Instead of paying $697 for the Python Network Programming Bundle, you'll pay just $24. That's 96 percent off the regular price. But that's not all — use coupon code GIFTSHOP at checkout and save an additional 15%! That will bring down the final price to just $20.40.

This bundle contains three courses, all primarily focused on networks. There's over 28 hours of content in these courses, which include:

  • Python Network Programming: Build 7 Python Apps
  • Python Network Programming: Multivendor Environment
  • Python Network Programming: Scapy & Security Tools

Access to this course remains open forever, so even if you don't have time right now, you can always jump in later. Don't wait too long to pull the trigger; this deal won't last forever.

See at Android Central Digital Offers

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3 days ago

Get a free Chromecast and Moto X4 when referring people to Project Fi

4

The promotion is running through December 17.

Despite its hardware restrictions and potentially expensive data charges, Project Fi is still one of the most unique service providers around. Google's been continually adding new features and services since its debut in 2015, and a new promotion lets you grab a free Chromecast and Moto X4 for referring others to join.

Google launched a referral system for Project Fi last December that allowed you to get credits on your bill when new customers signed up with your referral code, and between now and December 17, you can use that same system for grabbing some new tech.

Making two successful referrals will allow you to get a free Chromecast, but making five more for a total of seven will grant you with a Moto X4. That's the Android One version of the Moto X4 that comes with a stock build of Android and fast software updates, and considering that it normally costs $399, this is a fantastic promotion if you're a Fi customer.

In addition to this, Project Fi is also donating $50,000 to the Information Technology Disaster Resource Center to help provide some relief for areas affected by this year's devastating hurricanes and other storms.

Moto X4 review: A mid-range phone done right

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3 days ago

Anker's Black Friday deals start today, with sales on chargers, speakers, and more

0

A one-stop shop for whatever you need.

Anker is dropping prices on... well, everything. Today includes deals on chargers, cables, speakers, and a whole bunch of other things. Whatever gear you need, pretty sure you can get a nice chunk off the price today. All Anker products are covered by an 18-month warranty.

Cables

Cases

Chargers

Headphones

Home

Speakers

Wireless Mouse

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3 days ago

Cheap Fitness Trackers You've Never Heard Of

5

Don't spend your money on a high-end fitness tracker right off the bat, try out one of these cheap ones instead!

When it comes to fitness trackers, big names like Fitbit, Garmin, and Jawbone have a real grip on the market. While Fitbit has been in the game a long time and makes a great product, the best Fitbit products cost a lot of money, same goes for big brands like Garmin and Jawbone.

If you're looking to try a fitness tracker for the first time, spending hundreds of dollars on a Fitbit or other big brand name may not be the wisest choice. Try before you buy isn't always realistic; however, if you buy a cheap fitness tracker first, you can see if it will be worth to upgrading to a more expensive brand later. Here are our favorite cheap fitness trackers that you've probably never heard about.

Wesoo K1 fitness watch

For only $30, the Wesoo K1 offers lots of features that you'll find on higher-end fitness trackers for a fraction of the price.

Counting calories, steps per day, and distance traveled are all par for the course on any fitness tracker, but the addition of automatic sleep monitoring, silent vibrating alarms, and sedentary alerts makes the $30 price tag even sweeter.

One of the coolest features of the Wesoo K1 is its ability to charge without a cable. That's right: when you take the Wesoo K1 out of the band, there's a built-in USB plug on the tracker so you just have to plug it into your computer, wall outlet, or even a power bank to charge it.

You can buy the Wesoo K1 fitness watch with an extra band in either purple or blue.

See at Amazon

FitOn

FitOn is a relatively ambitious Kickstarter campaign, that looks promising and has already reached its funding goal.

On top of tracking all your important fitness metrics — steps per day, calories burned, distance, traveled, etc. — FitOn is promising an IP68 water resistance rating meaning you can swim with this tracker on all you want without damaging it.

The FitOn promo video also describes an oxygen meter that's meant to help you gauge your blood oxygen levels during intense workouts or swims. Using this data with the included heart rate monitor will give you a better statistics when it comes to your personal training.

Now since this is a Kickstarter campaign there is a little bit of risk in backing it up; however, it's already over its funding goal so that risk should be limited. You can back this campaign and receive a FitOn when they start shipping for only $49.

See at Kickstarter

LEMFO fitness tracker

If you're going to be wearing something on your wrist all day, why not make it stand out a little? The LEMFO fitness tracker has a bold design that will is bound to get noticed while packing in important fitness tracker features.

The automatic sleep monitoring will kick in when you decide to lay your weary head down for a rest, and the active heart rate monitor will help you track your pulse through even the most intense workouts.

The LEMFO fitness tracker has an IP67 rating, meaning you can take it for a quick swim or out in the rain with no problem and even supports messages and call notifications to keep you up to date.

For only $35, LEMFO fitness tracker is a great way to see if you enjoy using a fitness tracker or not.

See at Amazon

X-CHENG fitness tracker

If you like the idea of having a fitness tracker that embraces the smart side of things, the X-CHENG fitness tracker may be your best bet.

While its big display and bold design may not be your style, the X-CHENG fitness tracker checks all the boxes. IP67 water resistance rating, automatic sleep monitoring, heart rate monitor, calorie counter, step counter, and all the other essential fitness tracking abilities are present.

Not only can this thing receive your calls and texts, it also can hook up to your Facebook, Twitter, and other social apps and send all your important notifications right to your wrist! Plus, even with the huge display, the battery should still last you a whole week between charges, meaning you don't have to worry about it dying in the middle of your workouts as often.

You can pick up the X-CHENG fitness tracker for $45.

See at Amazon

MyKronoz ZeFit4

The MyKronoz ZeFit4 features a full-color screen, heart rate monitor, and tracks all the basic data that you want in a fitness tracker for only $40.

The free app works seamlessly with the MyKronoz ZeFit4 so you can keep your eyes on your calories burned, steps per day, workouts, and sleep all in one place. Plus, it comes with an IP67 rating, meaning you can get it wet without a problem.

You'll get about five days of battery life with the ZeFit4 and it only takes about 90 minutes to charge from dead to full, meaning you'll never have to be without the tracker on your wrist for long.

See at Amazon

Don't trust these unrecognizable brands?

If you don't mind spending a little more money for a brand name you can trust, companies like Fitbit, Xiaomi, Jawbone, and Misfit have some pretty great trackers for under $50.

Read: Best Fitness Trackers Under $50

Do you have any suggestions?

Do you know of any fitness trackers that nobody has heard about? We want to hear from you. Leave us a comment down below!

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3 days ago

Google will fix hissing sound on Pixel 2 in 'the coming weeks'

12

Your Pixel 2 will soon be free of both clicking and hissing.

Since its release, a number of users of the smaller Pixel 2 have reported a faint hissing sound that can be heard when the phone is placed near your ear during a phone call. My device doesn't appear to be affected, but those that are experiencing the issue should be relieved to know that a software update will soon be available that eliminates it for good.

This announcement came from a community manager of Google's Pixel User Community, and it's said that the update will be available "in the coming weeks." We certainly would have liked a more solid ETA, but having a light at the end of the tunnel is still great nonetheless.

Google recently fixed the clicking noise also found with the Pixel 2 in the November security patch, and that was discovered to be a bug with the phone's NFC chip. It's unclear exactly what's causing the hissing, but I suppose that won't matter in a few weeks.

Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL

Google Store Project Fi Verizon Best Buy

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