Google might rebrand Nearby Share into something Samsung users know better

Nearby Share on Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 5
(Image credit: Andrew Myrick / Android Central)

What you need to know

  • Google is reportedly rebranding Nearby Share to Quick Share, complete with a new name and icon integrated throughout Android's UI.
  • Quick Share is the branding Samsung uses for its own file-sharing service, although Nearby Share is also currently available on Galaxy phones.
  • This rebranding could be Google's way of simplifying file sharing across different platforms and devices, especially for Samsung users.

Android's version of AirDrop could be in for a name change, as per a couple of reliable sources.

There's buzz about Google renaming Nearby Share to Quick Share, according to Android leaker Kamila Wojciechowska, who spotted the change after installing a recent GMS (Google Mobile Services) update with version 23.50.13.

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Wojciechowska noted that she received a notification about the rebranding, announcing the shift to "Quick Share." Besides the fresh moniker, the service flaunts a new icon featuring two arrows facing each other with semicircular tails. In contrast, the current icon sports a pair of wavy blue lines intertwined.

Google didn't apparently stop at just the icon facelift. The search giant went ahead and updated the branding everywhere you look on Android. Mishaal Rahman on Android Authority also caught on to this, noting that the new Quick Share name is all over the place, from the Quick Settings tile to the discoverability dialog and even the file-sharing interface.

It seems like this is just a name change and a fresh new icon. The way you share files and stuff stays the same. If this is accurate, it's interesting that Google picked the name Quick Share, which happens to be the same name Samsung uses for its file-sharing solution on Galaxy phones.

Rahman hints at something bigger than a name swap—there's a chance Google and Samsung are planning to merge their file-sharing services or, at the very least, make them play nice together.

Currently, Samsung users juggle between the native Quick Share and Google's Nearby Share when sharing files. It's a bit of a head-scratcher. But if the gossip about a merger is true, we could be looking at a future where there's just one option to rule them all, working seamlessly on both Samsung and other Android devices.

After all, having different file-sharing services with the same name is just asking for a headache, especially for Samsung users. That said, there's no solid proof yet that these services are joining forces. But considering the situation, it's looking like the odds are pretty high.

Jay Bonggolto
News Writer & Reviewer

Jay Bonggolto always keeps a nose for news. He has been writing about consumer tech and apps for as long as he can remember, and he has used a variety of Android phones since falling in love with Jelly Bean. Send him a direct message via Twitter or LinkedIn.

  • cribble2k
    In my opinion, this feature would be a lot more useful if it worked with sharing things to Windows 11 PC's.
    Reply
  • rvbfan
    cribble2k said:
    In my opinion, this feature would be a lot more useful if it worked with sharing things to Windows 11 PC's.
    https://support.google.com/android/answer/13801258?hl=enAll ready can.
    Reply
  • bradavon
    That's the Samsung Quick Share icon too. Google didn't just copy it without good reason.

    Google's done this before. They convinced Samsung to deprecate their Samsung Messages apps. Convinced Samsung way back to kill it's movie rental service.

    Nearby Share is also the name of the same Windows feature no one uses because it only supports Windows devices.
    Reply
  • bradavon
    rvbfan said:
    https://support.google.com/android/answer/13801258?hl=enAll ready can.
    Not Windows on ARM PCs though. Google doesn't support the platform.

    Silly really when there's now a healthy amount of apps or ARM, including many VPNs that didn't used to work. 2024 is going to be a big year for ARM too.
    Reply
  • Laura Knotek
    bradavon said:
    Not Windows on ARM PCs though. Google doesn't support the platform.

    Silly really when there's now a healthy amount of apps or ARM, including many VPNs that didn't used to work. 2024 is going to be a big year for ARM too.
    Nobody uses ARM Windows PCs. Those are Mac and Chromebook. https://www.tomshardware.com/pc-components/cpus/arm-pc-market-share-shrinks-mercury-research#:~:text=Mercury%20Research%20believes%20that%20Arm,same%20quarter%20a%20year%20ago.
    Reply
  • Village_Idiot
    Laura Knotek said:
    Nobody uses ARM Windows PCs. Those are Mac and Chromebook. https://www.tomshardware.com/pc-components/cpus/arm-pc-market-share-shrinks-mercury-research#:~:text=Mercury Research believes that Arm,same quarter a year ago.
    Nobody uses ARM for now. Now that Qualcomm and nVidia have jumped into the ARM arena, that will change. If Intel keeps blowing ARM off, it will get kicked in the junk.

    ARM is the future. Microsoft has recognized that and is starting to position itself to take advantage of it.
    Reply
  • Laura Knotek
    Village_Idiot said:
    Nobody uses ARM for now. Now that Qualcomm and nVidia have jumped into the ARM arena, that will change. If Intel keeps blowing ARM off, it will get kicked in the junk.

    ARM is the future. Microsoft has recognized that and is starting to position itself to take advantage of it.
    I suspect that Windows itself will become less popular in general. It will become something for work only since nobody needs it for personal use other than for gaming. Gaming will probably adapt to Steam Deck and similar handheld devices, so nobody will need a PC for personal use in the home.
    Reply
  • Village_Idiot
    Laura Knotek said:
    I suspect that Windows itself will become less popular in general. It will become something for work only since nobody needs it for personal use other than for gaming. Gaming will probably adapt to Steam Deck and similar handheld devices, so nobody will need a PC for personal use in the home.
    Doubtful. Nadella has done a great job at keeping Microsoft relevant. He learned some hard lessons when he dumped Windows Phone.
    Reply
  • Laura Knotek
    Village_Idiot said:
    Doubtful. Nadella has done a great job at keeping Microsoft relevant. He learned some hard lessons when he dumped Windows Phone.
    Other than for business purposes, what else requires Windows?
    Reply
  • Village_Idiot
    Laura Knotek said:
    Other than for business purposes, what else requires Windows?
    Pretty much every gaming PC ever built.
    Reply