Google has announced that they'll be ramping up their Google Goggles efforts with some key advertisers. While it's still only in the experimental stages, Google has signed up Buick, Disney, Diageo, T-Mobile and Delta Airlines to do market testing of Google Goggles. Soon, we'll be seeing "Goggles enabled" ads spread across movie posters, print ads and other marketing media. 

The goal of course is to have users recognize the Goggles enabled items and make use of their devices to explore the online destinations being offered. Those destinations could be say, an interactive ad from Disney or Buick as shown above. As it's still experimental it might be a while before we see any show up but if you spot some let us know. Download links for Google Goggles and video of the experiment are after the break. [Google Mobile Blog]

 
There are 6 comments

chuch13 says:

On page 2 of Rolling Stone Issue 1116 there is a Google goggle enabled ad for G2/T-Mobile/HTC...when "goggled" it takes you too g2.t-mobile.com. Not significant...but interesting that it worked.

chuch13 says:

Wow just watched the video and realized its the same T-mobile ad as from the beginning of the video...but at least we know its in magazines as of Oct. 28...

draken says:

And why not just use QR codes? I was surprised to see a QR code on a banner at Hooters for their new 2011 Calendar. The code took you to a behind the scenes video from the calendar shoot. Target ads are now starting to use QR codes as well. Don't really see the need for Google to put yet another type of bar code out there.

lancehart says:

Don't be surprised if you see Disney put this to use with their
Tron Legacy ad campaign with a quickness.

I see this as an opportunity for advertisers to enable customers to engage in their products on a different level. Combine the "layar" idea with the camera and show off the features of the vehicle. GM tested a similar concept for their repair centers where the garage techs wore glasses that highlighted the dis-functional parts. I'm sure they see the capabilities to merge print and movable media too!

And as for QR codes, they can be pretty large sometimes and may not be "pretty" enough for advertisers. Many of the graphic artists I work with don't find them fun to work with.

icebike says:

So this is Chrome-to-phone for the printed page.

QR codes take more space.

The thing is, its mostly unnecessary. Shoot any full page (or partial page) display ad in any magazine and 4 out of 5 times it will take you directly to the product being advertised.

Goggles is pretty awesome.