Gameloft unveils five new free-to-play casual games for Android

Gameloft has announced that they will be expanding their Let's Play brand with five more games launching this summer on Google Play. Let's Play is geared towards casual mobile gamers in a free-to-play (read IAP-heavy) format. The new games will be:

  • Cosmic Colony: The action unfolds on a mysterious planet where players must create and organize their colony and make it prosper. Surprising events and space missions await players of all ages as they become space pioneers.
  • Monster Life: With its original design, this game lets both the young and the young at heart interact with 3D papercraft monsters, build their habitats, take care of them, and train them to battle other monsters throughout various quests.
  • MY LITTLE PONY : Featuring everyone’s favorite characters such as PINKIE PIE and TWILIGHT SPARKLE from the My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic animated series, created by Hasbro Studios and currently airing on the The HUB TV Network in the US. Girls and fans of all ages will look forward to building their very own town of Ponyville, while enjoying a series of mini games that are sure to please.
  • Kingdoms & Lords: In this simulation and strategy game, players can build their own kingdom and form an army to hold off barbarian invaders. Players can battle each other to prove who has the better army in this compelling title.
  • UNO® & Friends: This new game will let the huge worldwide base of UNO® fans connect with one another on smartphones, tablets or Facebook. Players will enjoy having the ability to challenge up to 3 other players in real time, while interacting using the in-game chat modes as well. A game started on a smartphone or tablet can be finished on Facebook, and vice versa.

As you can tell, the games are build with all ages in mind - not a lot of shoot-'em-ups in this list. The brand is on iOS as well, and if the UNO & Friends announcement was any indication, many of the new games should offer multiplayer compatibility across a bunch of different platforms. 

The Let's Play brand is relatively new, having only launched in February with Ice Age Village, Oregon Trail, Fashion Icon, Fantasy Town, and Let's Golf 3. It's great that these new titles will be clearly labeled as family-friendly, but I definitely worry how heavily Gameloft will be pushing IAPs on 12-year-old girls. Is friendship only going to be moderately magical in My Little Pony unless she shells out another $0.99?

 

Reader comments

Gameloft unveils five new free-to-play casual games for Android

14 Comments

I think the word "free" combined with heavy "in app purchases" just isn't correct and should be avoided. It would be like me running a cab company and saying "free rides", and I will take you 1/4 mile in any of three directions, after that you have to pay or get out. Or offering "free cable TV", that gives you 3 stations that can be watched only for a few minutes, then it shuts off until you subscribe.

This model is more like a "try before buy" or "free limited trial". Free with ads is much more free.

The word "free" is so extremely misused it is unbelievable. Other examples: "free phone", there is nothing free about those "free" phones because one is paying for it every month in a contract. Or "buy one get one free", that is buying two for 50% off regular price, there is nothing "free" about the transaction.

I play a so called "free-to-play" dungeon crawler, but less than one-tenth of the game is available if you don't subscribe. Maybe one-sixteenth, considering there are eight worlds, and you can only access half of the first world without a subscription. You can play forever in that half world, but there's not a lot to do.

really now? how about we unveil ASPHALT 7 for Android you money hungry f*cks. you want android users money yet you treat us second hand to worthless iOS. any other game i get from you guys, i will not be buying it.

^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!^This!

Sorry, if I'm a little repetitive.

Lets call a spade a spade. There's free-to-play, and then there's freemium ransom ware. Free-to-play means you can play and complete the game without handicap without using IAP. Freemium ransom ware is what all of gameloft's "no initial purchase price" apps are, and the greedy bastards aim to get much more than 4 or 5 bucks out of anyone that want's to get past the tutorial stage.