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5 hours ago

Deal: New Tello customers get the first month of data service FREE

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If you're in the market for a new pay-as-you-go plan, Tello may have just what you need. New customers can buy any Tello cell phone plan of $10 or more and get the first month of data FREE. All of the data options that Tello offers, from 200MB to 5GB, are eligible for this limited-time promotion.

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5 hours ago

What you need to know about dual-SIM on the OnePlus 5

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OnePlus 5 dual SIM

Here's what you need to know about one of the OnePlus 5's most underrated features.

There are many reasons why you might want to pick up a OnePlus 5 — the price, the clean software experience, fast performance, or the bragging rights that go with 8GB of RAM. But one of the phone's most useful features for travelers isn't being heavily advertised. OnePlus's latest phone, like earlier models, is a dual-SIM handset. And that can save you a lot of hassle — and money — if you're a frequent traveler.

Here's what you need to know.

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6 hours ago

Galaxy Note Pro: Why Samsung should sell a $1500 phone

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What happens when you unleash Samsung's design, scale and dominance in the ultra high-end market?

In 2014, Samsung achieved something that few in the working tech media had the remaining capacity to feel: surprise. It did this at a relatively subtle launch event in New York City, inside the building that would become its flagship showcase, Samsung 837.

The product was the Galaxy Note Edge, which debuted alongside the company's real fall flagship, the Note 4. The Note Edge was essentially a Note 4 with one side of its display a cascade of OLED and glass that, impossibly, met the metal bezel and disappeared. It was amazing and ridiculous and, unsurprisingly, not particularly useful. But it didn't matter: people coveted this aspirational device, which was more expensive and harder to obtain than anything else from Samsung at the time. More importantly, the curved display technology that debuted in the Note Edge has since informed and, now, completely altered the trajectory of Samsung's phone business. You can't buy a Galaxy flagship without a curved OLED display.

The Galaxy Note Edge was an experiment that turned into a sea change for Samsung's mobile future.

At the time, the Note Edge was little more than an experiment, a technology demo; the company didn't market the phone much, largely because you couldn't really do much with that edge screen, but also because the nascent manufacturing process was finicky, and production notoriously slow. It would take until 2015, with the much more mainstream (and symmetrical) Galaxy S6 edge before the kinks were worked out and curved screen phones could be built at scale.

I think about all this in the run-up to both the Galaxy Note 8 and iPhone 8 launch because recently there's been a renewed focus on the aspirational high end of the market. The Galaxy Note 8 alone is expected to cost close to $1000 (though more reasonably closer to $900), while the iPhone 8, or iPhone Pro as some are calling it, could fetch up to $1500 in its most expensive configuration.

In a piece for iMore, Rene Ritchie makes the argument for why the iPhone 8 will cost so much:

iPhone 8 — or whatever Apple calls the higher-end model this year — is another attempt to fill a space, a more expensive and more premium one. Serendipitously, the relatively smaller size of the higher-end market also lets Apple embrace newer and more advanced technologies — the ones that are harder to scale — sooner.

That's because Apple makes and sells millions of iPhones a year, and needs every version to be identical, even if it introduces some new technology from a partner like Samsung, or Broadcom, or Qualcomm, that's difficult to manufacture at scale. The argument here is that if the iPhone 8 introduces something like behind-the-glass fingerprint sensing, inductive charging, or bezel-less OLED screens, it has to be able to procure enough components to satisfy the market, which last year was above 200 million units.

Apple and Samsung produce phones at scales that are not matched anywhere else in the mobile ecosystem, though OPPO and Vivo are quickly catching up.

But it will be incredibly difficult to outfit a phone with a handful of brand new (for Apple) and expensive hardware components that would be sold for $850 at a 35% margin. It's just not going to happen. So, in order to meet that internal requirement for high margins and higher profits, Apple will be forced to price the iPhone 8 considerably higher than any model before it — perhaps even as high as $1500. It won't be able to make many, so it will have to earn more from each one it sells. Make sense, right?

Well, let's move that argument over to the Android space, and investigate the same potential move by Samsung. No other company in the Android ecosystem produces and sells as many phones as Samsung. No other company makes as much profit as Samsung. Practically no other company can match the scale required to build and sell hundreds of millions of phones every year (though one could argue that Huawei and LG could if the demand required it of them), nor does any other company, including Apple, control the production of as many of the components that go inside the phones as Samsung.

That's why Samsung should build a Galaxy Note Pro.

A Galaxy Note Pro would do things my chimp brain can't even dream up.

It took me a while to get here, mainly because setting the stage is important in an argument like this. The Galaxy Note series is already aspirational, and certainly the most expensive in Samsung's lineup, but in recent years the line has converged, both aesthetically and technologically, with flagship Galaxys, to be separate in S Pen alone. Sure, the Galaxy Note 8 is expected to have a dual camera setup and more RAM, but from everything we've seen so far it looks to be both iterative and familiar.

A Galaxy Note Pro, however, would be expensive. It would include technologies that are hard to produce at scale, like an under-the-glass fingerprint sensor, impressive speakers, and a beautiful, energy-efficient (and VR-ready) 4K display. Its cameras would do more than just produce depth effects, but would use mirrors and prisms to extend focal length, or improve low-light capabilities, without increasing thickness. It may even fold. It would do things my chimp brain can't even dream up.

Samsung is singularly capable in a sea of me-too and low-margin Android manufacturers of producing an honest-to-goodness $1500 phone that people would not only want to buy, but be able to buy. Other companies could surely piece together prototypes, and maybe produce a few thousand units — just look at RED's new Hydrogen One phone for an example of such excess — but Samsung could easily produce a few million Galaxy Note Pro units without risking so much as a cautionary note on its quarterly earnings report. The Galaxy Note Pro would be the dream phone people could actually buy at Verizon, not some special edition Porsche Design Mate 9 that no one asked for.

On the marketing side, Samsung is the only company capable of producing in people a burning need to have this unattainable thing. In the first quarter of 2017, it sold 22.8% of all smartphones worldwide, a number slightly higher than its three major Android competitors — Huawei, Vivo, and OPPO — combined. It is on track to report its most profitable quarter ever, and continues to be, for many people not particularly well versed in the tech space, the only company selling Android phones; it's not uncommon to meet people who identify Android as 'Galaxy'. A Galaxy Note Pro would sit atop that success story.

Moreover, the Galaxy Note Pro would inform future phones in Samsung's lineup, giving fans a realistic impression of what to expect in the following year, at a much more accessible price — and with all the kinks worked out.

(There's a separate semantic argument to be made that the Note name, given the recent damage to its reputation and its meandering drift towards mainstream appeal in recent years, wouldn't be appropriate for such a phone, and it should just be called the Galaxy Pro. Samsung does have a history of using the Pro moniker in its tablet, Chromebook and laptop lineup, so it would make sense to see it on the phone side, too.)

Many of the problems that Apple is addressing with the so-called iPhone 8 — edge to edge screens, retina unlock, wireless charging — Samsung solved years ago. A Galaxy Note Pro would be an opportunity to move back into a position of authority, to build on the years of experience it took to get from the Note Edge to the Galaxy S8. Those two phones don't look anything alike, but that's because it took Samsung half a decade to figure out exactly what people want. Now that it knows, it can continue to lead.

Samsung Galaxy Note 8

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7 hours ago

OnePlus releases software update to fix OnePlus 5 '911 reboot' issue [Updated]

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The OnePlus 5 may have a pretty dangerous '911' bug.

Update, July 20: OnePlus has confirmed that the hotfix rollout has begun.

Update, July 19: OnePlus has issued a statement saying that it has worked with the affected customer to identify the '911 reboot' bug and will release a fix shortly. Below is the full statement.

We have been in touch with the customer and have tested a software update that has resolved the issue. We will be rolling out the software update shortly.

Over the last few days, a small but growing number of OnePlus 5 users have claimed that upon dialing '911' or '999' — numbers designated for emergency services in the U.S. and UK, respectively — their phones have rebooted prior to the call going through.

On Reddit, many people have speculated that it is a problem with the phone's ability to find a reliable GPS signal, which is a necessary part of getting a phone certified for making emergency calls.

Comment from discussion [PSA] Dialling 911 may reboot your OnePlus 5 (x-post from /r/OnePlus).

Based on the information provided, Canadian OnePlus 5 users don't seem to be affected — attempts to dial 911 go through every time. At the same time, not every American user has reported failure, either: some calls appear to go through the first time, while others take a few tries and eventually connect to the operator.

Of course, we don't recommend testing out this particular bug without first informing your emergency department that you're doing so.

A Facebook user provided video evidence of the problem after failing to connect to emergency services to report a building fire, which prompted a spokesperson for OnePlus to release this statement:

We have contacted the customer and are currently looking into the issue. We ask anyone experiencing a similar situation to contact us at support@oneplus.net.

While this is certainly a troubling issue, it is not completely unique to the OnePlus 5. Certain phones — even Nexus phones for a time — reportedly had issues connecting with emergency services, but the feature was quickly restored through a software update.

Have you experienced this unfortunate bug? Let us know in the comments!

OnePlus 5

OnePlus

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7 hours ago

How to watch the British Open on your Android phone

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The British Open starts today, and you can watch it right from your phone!

Golf fans everywhere already know what today is: the Open Championship, also known as the British Open, starts today. If you don't want to miss a moment, or you want to rewatch the best moments, then you'll need to know how to watch using your phone. While this is a bit tricky because of when most coverage is airing, you can take advantage of replays and clips from a few different apps to stay up to date.

We've got the details for you here!

The Open

One of the best ways to keep up on everything going on during The British Open is the official Open app. You can watch the livestream, which is the ideal way to get a view of what is going on. You can watch a specific hole, or keep an eye on the featured group if you want to watch a specific player.

Of course, you can also listen to the radio broadcast, and watch highlights if you miss some of the action. The Open's app also includes a Course Guide, and a leaderboard. You can also check out The Open online for all of the same features if you want to check things out on your laptop.

Download The Open (free)

NBC Sports

NBC Sports also has tons of coverage for the British Open. You can watch live coverage if you're awake early, but you also get access to featured moments and clips throughout the weekend. This means that the most important moments that happen while you're sleeping will be available by the time that you wake up.

From within the app, you can filter the content, as well as see what is coming up over the weekend. Especially handy for those who haven't used the NBC Sports app before, there is a Golf Channel tab at the bottom of your screen. Tapping on that will directly bring you to all things British Open, which is exactly where you want to be.

You can also access of this through the website that has extras like more details on scores, and a better schedule. Of course, to access everything that NBC Sports has to offer, you will need to sign in with your cable provider.

Download NBC Sports (free)

Golf Channel Mobile

If all you're really interested in is golf, then you're going to want to take a look at Golf Channel Mobile. This is another app that you'll need to sign in using your cable provider, but once you do that you'll be good to go.

You can see scores, check the news, watch live videos, and even play some Fantasy Golf. This makes it a great way to keep up to date on things while the Open is going on!

Download Golf Channel Mobile (free)

Questions?

Do you still have questions about how to watch the British Open online? Is there another method that we missed here and ought to know about? Drop us a line in the comments below, and let us know all about it!

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Sponsored Post

Grab Samsung's USB-C cable for just $8 today

With Samsung’s latest phones moving from Micro-USB to USB-C, you may be in need of a few more cables for around the house. Samsung’s 3ft option is a great one to have around, and today you can pick it up for just $8.

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11 hours ago

Latest OxygenOS beta for OnePlus 3/3T includes battery and data usage optimizations

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New OxygenOS beta is now rolling out to the OnePlus 3 and 3T.

OnePlus is rolling out OxygenOS Open Beta 20 to the OnePlus 3 (Open Beta 11 for the 3T) that lets you take scrolling screenshots even when a GIF or video is playing. The update includes optimizations to the battery saver indicator — you'll now see a notification instead of the orange status bar. OnePlus has also improved the calculation method for data usage, leading to more accurate tracking.

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11 hours ago

Lenovo shows off its latest concepts, including a smart speaker with a built-in projector

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Lenovo is working on several ambitious concepts centered around AI.

Back in 2015, Lenovo showed off a laser projector built into a smartphone. Last year, the company revealed a flexible phone. At its Tech World 2017 summit, Lenovo showed off its latest concept products, and this time around, the manufacturer is focusing on AI.

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12 hours ago

You can now apply to become a beta tester for MIUI 9

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Be one of the first to try out MIUI 9.

Xiaomi is going to unveil MIUI 9 in China on July 26, and if you're like me and can't wait to get your hands on the ROM, you're in luck. Xiaomi has announced that it is looking for MIUI 9 beta testers, with the update hitting the Mi 6, Qualcomm-based versions of the Redmi Note 4, and the Redmi 4X (Redmi 4 in India) initially.

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12 hours ago

Here are all the deals from Xiaomi's third anniversary sale in India

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Xiaomi is celebrating its third anniversary in India by rolling out offers on accessories.

Xiaomi's journey in India began three years ago with the Mi 3, and the company is rolling out a series of offers to commemorate its three-year anniversary. Products like the Redmi Note 4, Redmi 4 and 4A are going up for sale later today, and there are lucrative discounts on accessories.

There's also an hourly flash sale that will allow you to pick up the Redmi 4A for just ₹1.

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22 hours ago

There's been a lot of work on Bluetooth in Android O, but we haven't seen it yet

22

Tricks learned writing the software for the Pixel can hopefully make Bluetooth faster, stronger, and better.

In their Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) session today, the Google team takes on Bluetooth. Specifically, if Android O can make it suck less.

The team is aware of all the Bluetooth errors and inconsistencies evident on many Android phones and have used a trick they learned while writing the new system elements for Android N on the Pixel.

Tim Murray: The Android Bluetooth, audio, and performance teams actually did a lot of work to improve BT audio in O. We flipped the switch internally since the most recent developer preview because we needed a little more time to make sure that things were stable, so you haven't seen the fruits of that labor quite yet.

What'd we do: back during Pixel development, the perf team guessed that it's probably a good idea to make the UI-critical parts of the system as deterministic as possible to avoid random scheduler delays. Turns out yes, that's a good idea, and removing scheduler delay from the UI pipeline fixes a ton of random jank. You can see the details of all the stuff we did at https://source.android.com/devices/tech/debug/eval_perf. It worked so well for UI that we decided to do the same thing for BT audio. We could see cases where random scheduler delay would cause BT audio artifacts, so we tried working our way through the entire BT pipeline to figure out exactly what guarantees were needed where to ensure that audio quality was perfect. This removed tens of milliseconds of possible jitter per BT packet and required fixes throughout the stack, from the framework down to kernel drivers.

Our testing shows that BT audio reliability is drastically better vs N because of these changes. We're happy with how it's turned out, and we hope you see the same kind of improvements.

Read the comment thread in i's entirety

In "regular" speech, they simplified code for the critical UI elements so that it was more linear and the system didn't have to wait for a task to get scheduled and have its turn. Cutting out the unnecessary delay and processing is much of what makes the UI on the Pixel as fluid and lag-free as it is. Using these same techniques on Bluetooth should mean more data gets sent in the same amount of time, and less time is being spent processing it at the source. This makes for a better connection and uninterrupted stream.

As noted, this was done since the last developer beta was released, so we haven't seen it in action yet. We look forward to seeing it, along with all the other final tweaks and refinements when Android O is officially released.

Android O

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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22 hours ago

Android team explains how Project Treble will (and won't) improve Android

6

Googlers confirm most of what we knew (and had guessed) about Project Treble.

Members of the Android engineering team at Google are participating in a Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) today. Find a list of the team members participating here.

One of the questions was about Project Treble and was wondering if thinking it could fix Android fragmentation was too optimistic. The response from the Android team explains most of what we need to know about Treble, and affirms many of the guesses crafted from the information we did have.

Devices launching with Android O will come Treble-enabled out of the box. Project Treble will make it easier, faster and less costly for device maker partners when these devices are updated in the future. In addition to the engineering changes, which enable Project Treble on all new devices launched with Android O and beyond, we're working closely with device makers and silicon manufacturers to both get required Android customizations (such as carrier-specific requirements) into AOSP, and reduce their cost and complexity when updating to the new version of Android. For example, Sony and Qualcomm have already contributed dozens of features and hundreds of bugfixes into AOSP so they no longer need to rework these patches with each new release of Android.

We'll publish more information about Project Treble on source.android.com soon.

Read the comment thread in its entirety

We know from Google I/O 2017 that many companies who make the components were asking for something like Project Treble, and seeing Qualcomm already taking advantage is a great sign. Further confirmation that smartphone makers have to incorporate Project Treble in new models is also good to hear.

We want Treble to make a significant difference. The existing way is obviously broken, so we can't help but hope the next step is better. These early indications keep us hopeful.

Android O

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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23 hours ago

These are the exclusive games for PlayStation VR

Which games are exclusive to PlayStation VR?

PlayStation VR is here and its library of games continues to grow. We love that a lot of our favorite titles from other platforms are also available on PSVR, but the real meat lies in the exclusive stuff.

What are the exclusive games, you ask? Here are all the titles that you'll only be able to play if you own a PS4!

Read more at VR Heads!

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1 day ago

Most Secure Android Phone

Best overall

Google Pixel

See at Google See at Verizon

The Google Pixel is the most secure Android phone you can buy, and one of the most secure phones of any available today.

Without disabling any security protections, the Pixel and Pixel XL are updated to keep you protected against known public security exploits and remote installations are monitored by Google's scanning software which blocks potential malicious content. While security and privacy are two very different things, when you decide you want private things to stay private you need to make sure your phone is secure to keep them that way.

Bottom line: The open-source nature of Android and the dedicated Android security team work in tandem to make the Pixel and Pixel XL the best phones when it comes to security and privacy.

One more thing: The Pixel and Pixel XL also show us that a secure phone that's great to use is a reality.

Why the Google Pixel is the best

A phone you want to use can also keep your data safe — and it comes in two sizes to fit everyone.

Every device that can connect to the internet has exploits available that break the default security configuration. If your phone isn't getting timely updates to combat them, you're simply not secure. We keep a vast amount of private — and priceless — data on our phones, and we all should care about keeping it safe from outside attacks. After you read all the agreements and decide what you're willing to give away, you should expect the remainder to stay private.

The Pixel phones are updated directly from Google with the latest version of Android. Outside of any new features that may come with, the device security model has been updated and strengthened by a dedicated team who regularly audits and enhances the code used to build Android. On top of this, Google releases updates to the security model at the beginning of every month for the people who build Android phones to apply to its software. These are important. More important than any other update. the Nexus 6P will get every one of them for its lifespan.

Equally important, but often overlooked, is transparency. You shouldn't have to trust a company when it says something is secure or updated, and the Android code for both the platform version and all updates is available for anyone to take a look at. Plenty of people do, and despite any opinions to the contrary, Android, as written, has proven to be a very secure platform. A phone like a Pixel is the embodiment of this.

Most important of all is that both Pixel phones are not only secure but are also phones that you'll want to use. No compromise is needed and the 5-inch Pixel and 5.5-inch Pixel XL both share the same fast processor and other internal components. A great — and secure — experience is available for fans of both sizes.

Best for typing

BlackBerry KEYone

See at BlackBerry Mobile

BlackBerry is legendary when it comes to mobile device management and security, and follows that trend when using Android to power its phones. With the KEYone, you also get the keyboard experience that only BlackBerry can offer. The KEYone is a great way to enjoy Android for people who still want a physical keyboard on their phone, and peace of mind that knowing a company is concerned about security.

Bottom line: BlackBerry continues its reputation of excellent mobile security and having a great keyboard with the KEYone.

One more thing: The BlackBerry is usually the first phone to get the monthly Android Security update — often hours before Google releases the bulletin itself!

Best for simplicity

BlackBerry DTEK60

See at BlackBerry

BlackBerry says the DTEK60 is the world's most secure Android phone.

The DTEK60 adds an enhanced version of the DTEK software tool to monitor application and system use to warn you when something isn't playing nicely. While this software is available as an update for the Priv, the out-of-the-box experience on the DTEK60 lets BlackBerry claim the "most secure Android "title. It's also pretty nice to use, too.

Bottom line:The DTEK60 is a welcome addition for many users and IT managers.

One more thing: Scott Wenger, VP of design and devices for BlackBerry says DTEK stands for "Detection."

Conclusion

Media outlets like to give Android a bad reputation when it comes to security, and it's difficult to blame them. Old, outdated software from manufacturers with no real concern for your security or privacy are the norm when it comes to phones running Android. But it doesn't have to be this way.

The Google Pixel delivers a great smartphone experience that ticks all the boxes for reviewers and users alike, and with no modifications, your personal data is very safe. A team of security professionals and engineers are dedicated to keeping it that way. Any of the phones on our list will do a great job when it comes to security, but the overall experience makes the Google Pixel the best.

Best overall

Google Pixel

See at Google See at Verizon

The Google Pixel is the most secure Android phone you can buy, and one of the most secure phones of any available today.

Without disabling any security protections, the Pixel and Pixel XL are updated to keep you protected against known public security exploits and remote installations are monitored by Google's scanning software which blocks potential malicious content. While security and privacy are two very different things, when you decide you want private things to stay private you need to make sure your phone is secure to keep them that way.

Bottom line: The open-source nature of Android and the dedicated Android security team work in tandem to make the Pixel and Pixel XL the best phones when it comes to security and privacy.

One more thing: The Pixel and Pixel XL also show us that a secure phone that's great to use is a reality.

Update July 2017: The Google Pixel remains our top pick, with the BlackBerry KEYone and DTEK60 rounding out the list.

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1 day ago

HMD Global CEO leaves abruptly ahead of Nokia 8 launch

30

This is an odd one.

HMD Global (better known as just "HMD"), the company now making Nokia-branded phones, has parted ways with CEO Arto Nummela despite the company being in the middle of a re-launch of the Nokia brand. HMD calls this a "mutual agreement," which sounds rather ominous and adds to the confusion over why Nummela would leave as the company seems as though it's on an upswing.

HMD's new Nokia 3, 5, and 6, as well as the nostalgia-laden Nokia 3310, have been on the radar of many since launching earlier in the year at the MWC trade show. The Nokia 8, which is expected to launch soon, is supposed to be a proper flagship device that will compete at the top end of the market above $600. It's a far riskier bet than the budget-focused Nokia phones and one that could be a pivotal point for HMD's strategy with the Nokia brand.

HMD's board chairman Sam Chin had this to say on Nummela's departure:

Arto Nummela has played a key role in the creation of the HMD Global operation, building the team and launching our first products. On behalf of the whole Board, I thank Arto for his contribution and wish him well in his future endeavors.

While HMD looks for a new CEO, the current President and founder Florian Seiche has taken on the acting CEO role immediately.

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