Google Glass

We could talk for days and days about Google Glass and whether it's distracting while driving. And we will continue to talk about it. It doesn't matter that Glass still costs $1,500 and that so few people have it — we're Exploring, remember? Pardon the pun, but we're supposed to be experiencing these speed bumps along the way.

That said, I think it was pretty evident last week how traffic court perhaps isn't the best arena for these discussions. It's too easy for one's passion for Glass to overwhelm the story. It's too easy to misinterpret the technicalities of courtroom procedure. We saw that in the broad spectrum of headlines. "GLASS IS LEGAL!" (Actually, the traffic commissioner, said, it's not.) "Ticket for Google Glass driving dismissed." Yeah, but that's not really what was important. Driving with Glass — or other similar wearables — will sort itself out in the coming months and years. Of that I have no doubt.

There are still too many of us with one hand on the wheel — and the other on a phone.

Driving home this afternoon, though, I was reminded that Glass really has been a distraction — from the larger story. There still are far too many of us in the driver's seat with phones in our hands. Never mind space-age contraptions on our faces. The real danger comes from the phone that should be in our pocket. 

It doesn't matter what operating system it runs. It doesn't matter whether it has the latest updates. Screen size, RAM, processor speed, the number of cores — none of that means a thing when it comes to taking your eyes off the road.

I'm still not perfect at this. I strap my young daughters into child seats in the back but too often put them in danger from three feet in front. This has to stop. I have to do better. We all have to better. 

We're going to continue to talk about this in 2014. I'm convinced that it's still one of the most important conversations to be had in the mobile space.

A few other thoughts on the week that was:

  • Speaking of Google Glass, our Through Glass series will resume soon after a few weeks away for the holidays at CES.
  • Another editorial initiative we're going to get back to is doing more basic how-to posts for major devices. That means you'll be seeing headlines that, frankly, are beneath many of us here. But one of the things I love about Android Central is that we've never been afraid to want to help newcomers to the Android space. And we're going to improve our efforts to do so.
  • (That also means if and when folks start complaining about those basic posts, I'm going to refer them to this column and say "Hey, we told you this was happening. Suck it up and enjoy all our other content instead.")
  • I've had a Nest for nearly a week now since Google bought the company, and no Google+ spam has appeared on my living room wall. 
  • And the Nest is making me wish I had a nicer wall to put it on. It looks that good.
  • We're slowly starting to put things together for Mobile World Congress, which is only about a month away. It'll be more traditional coverage, and not anything near the scope of what we did at CES.
  • If you haven't read Alex Dobie's take on Android OS updates, stop what you're doing (erm, which is reading this column) and read it now.
  • We now have Android apps for CrackBerry, iMore and Smartwatch Fans. WPCentral is up next, and after that we'll get back to our own Android Central app and some long-awaited features. Thanks for your patience.

And with that, I'm going back to football. See ya'll on Monday.