Ah, Blackberry. If you think about it, Blackberry is the last of the "old guard" of smartphones still standing. Palm rebooted with webOS and Windows Mobile is looking to do the same with Windows Mobile 7. The (relatively) new players in the game, iPhone and Android, have introduced new philosophies and innovative features while Blackberry just keeps on churning, with its pager history on its back and keyboard tradition on the front, a Blackberry today is simply, yet unmistakably, a better Blackberry from yesterday.

And to tell you guys the truth, I love me some Blackberry. Even though it's a completely different experience compared to the Android experience, there's a lot to love and learn from Blackberry. Though it's not the most ideal device for me, I can definitely see why its so wildly successful. It's undoubtedly a unique experience. But there are obvious limitations to Blackberry, perhaps more so than any other platform, but hey, Blackberrys get things done, right?

See what Android Central thinks of the Blackberry platform in the full review below!

Hardware

Bold 9700

Any way you spin it, the Bold 9700 is a wonderfully built device, rock solid from head to toe, screen to keyboard. The Bold 9700 is especially a joy to use because it feels so good in the hand--it's nearly the perfect size, in both shape and depth, for a phone. There's really no Android device like it. Unlike last year's Bold 9000, which was a large and in charge device, the Bold 9700 has a smaller footprint that is much easier to handle. If you want to get nitpicky, you could complain that it doesn't feel like a true 'Bold' but rather more from the 'Curve' family of design. But it's a better device through and through.

The Bold 9700 replaces the famed Blackberry trackball (of which some Android devices 'borrowed' from) with an optical trackpad. Many people consider the optical trackpad an ingenious solution because it fixes the previous trackball issues (dust buildup, gets mucky, etc) but I'm not sure it's absolutely, definitively better. Yes, it's nearly as accurate and A LOT easier on the eyes, but there were instances where I felt it misread my movements--I went passed the icon I wanted to press. Don't get me wrong, I would prefer an optical trackpad over a trackball any day (darn you Nexus One!) but I think it could be improved--I don't believe it's a perfect navigational method just yet. What would be cool is if Blackberry extended the optical trackpad to that entire row of buttons, that way you have more real estate to move around and the possibility of more advanced gestures.

Because Android devices are seemingly married to large touchscreens, I was unsure if I could adapt my usage to the smaller screen of a Bold 9700. The screen is only 2.4 inches diagonal compared to the 3.7-inch screen of the Droid. And yes, there were times where I wanted a bigger screen but for the most part, the Bold 9700's screen did the job. It's absolutely clear enough, that's for sure. If Blackberry users are married to that form factor of front facing keyboard plus a screen (and to be fair, it's a great form factor), this really is their best solution.

And if Android could steal a hardware feature from the Bold 9700 it'd be the keyboard, no question. The keyboard just flies--there's no learning curve--you'll be typing as fast as you can in no time. Some Android devices have physical keyboards yes, but it doesn't even come close to the efficiency of a Blackberry keyboard. It's likely due to the form factor, but it's very surprising that not one Android manufacturer has built a Blackberry-esque device, even if it was just to see if it could work.

Storm 2

It was around last year's Round Robin when the original Storm was released and it was an important device for Blackberry because of the touchscreen nature of it. Sadly, that original Storm was an excuse of a device. It seemed undercooked, half-baked, and whatever synonym you can come up with just 'not being ready'. I was expecting the same with the Storm 2, firmly believing that RIM just didn't understand how to make a touchscreen device, but I could not have been more wrong. This is the phone that RIM should have introduced as the original Storm. The SurePress screen technology works in this sense. Touch to select, press to execute--definitely still within that Blackberry philosophy.

What's insanely cool about the Storm 2 is that its SurePress technology is further refined. Previously, it hinged on one single button, so there were weak points, wobbly points, and just non working points. This time, they introduced 4 buttons underneath the screen and it's electronically controlled meaning that when the device is off, it's impossible to click down. It's a small detail, but it's oh so cool in execution. It's these little details that the original Storm lacked, the little details that RIM usually addresses. Good to see it happen.

Overall, the build quality of the Storm 2 is stellar. Good choice of materials, purposeful weight, and great size. You get a larger screen too, so it's easier for touchscreen aficionados to familiarize themselves with. Surprisingly, I found the soft keyboard on the Storm2 to be very easy to use--in some cases, it's even better than the Android soft keyboard.

However, as much as I enjoyed the Storm 2, there's really nothing I would want Android to 'steal' from. The great build quality is nice but other than that, the Storm 2 fits the Blackberry philosophy of doing things better than the Android way.

The Blackberry Way

For most users who need a phone first, smartphone features second, a typical Blackberry like the Bold 9700 is perfect. Why? Because it's the smartphone that is the most 'phone'-like. There's no slider, no software keyboard, no ideas that seem too foreign. That's a plus when it comes to people who are used to featurephones, the Blackberry philosophy puts communication first, everything second. And there's a huge market for that, as can be seen by its sales, but I think as the smartphone market is evolving and the needs of a user becomes more diverse, Blackberry is lacking in that next level of usage. The browser is unimpressive, the homescreen experience is limited, and the philosophies of Blackberry is growing outdated. Smartphones aren't just to merely communicate anymore.

And by no means I'm saying the Blackberry way is bad. In fact, if you want a smartphone to be a communication device first and foremost, it's very hard to beat Blackberry. There's the excellent e-mail, there's the BBM, there's an easy way to contact your contacts and it's all wrapped under a package that puts communication first (as can be seen by the front facing keyboard). But if you want your smartphone to be more intensive, to be more like a small tablet computer than anything else, to feel as if you're using the future--you'll have to look elsewhere.

Lastly, and this only applies to a small, miniscule set of smartphone users, but darn the fact that your Blackberry is locked to your PIN. Darn the fact that you have to get a special specific Blackberry plan. And darn the fact that its e-mail is so stringent. 98% of smartphone users won't notice these issues but for those who like to bounce back and forth different platforms (like us), it's just too hard to do on Blackberry.

Where Does Blackberry Go From Here?

Let's be honest here, the Blackberry OS is tired. I don't even know what's different from last year. It's supposed to be BBOS 5.0 but for such a significant number, so little change can be discerned from the user-end. From what Crackberry Kevin tells me, a lot of the improvements are under the hood and are preparing Blackberry for the future. Good to know but not that good to use.

But yes, Blackberry gets things done and it gets things done fast--but that's about it. There's no innovation in notifications, no glamorous way to multitask, and no widgets to extend the homescreen experience. It's like using a device that is obviously shackled by its history. Blackberrys have nailed communication but have left everything else in the past. Things definitely need to be changed but it looks like RIM isn't looking to completely overhaul the BBOS. I guess if it's not completely broke so there's no dire need to fix it, right? But where does Blackberry go from here?

I posed that question to members of the Crackberry community and the large majority said apps. And to be honest, that's where every smartphone is headed. Aside from the iPhone, every smartphone platform needs not only more apps but better apps. And though Blackberry app situation may be limited right now, the fact that there are so many Blackberry users should assuage your fears--developers will develop for Blackberry because there's just so many users. Inelegant or not, numbers don't lie.

Browser

It's 2010. The Blackberry browser blows. It's unintuitive, slow, and just janky all around. It will get better when Blackberry introduces their Webkit based browser but for now this is without a doubt the worst stock browser in the smartphone space. Compare it to any other smartphone browser and it simply doesn't hold a candle. Browsing the web without a touchscreen just isn't as efficient to us Android users. Fix now.

The 'Crack'

I was always under the impression that Blackberry can build a community like no other smartphone can. And that's true because every Blackberry is inherently tied to every other Blackberry because of how it's set up as a device. And things like BBM and push e-mail certainly help it's addictive nature but really Blackberrys--Crackberrys--are more than just that. It's the fact that everything on a Blackberry is geared toward staying connected to one another. The keyboard allows for wonderfully quick typing. The e-mail is instant communication. The notification light keeps the Blackberry within an arm's reach. The OS is super fast. BBM makes everyone feel together. Everything in a Blackberry is the 'crack'. The BBOS is limited to be sure, but I'm not afraid to say that Blackberry is the most unique smartphone platform available. Those who use and love Blackberrys just won't find the same experience on another device.

And the Blackberry as we know it is iconic. From the Curve 8310 of the very first Round Robin to the Bold 9700 of this year's, a Blackberry user is at home with both devices. If you've used a Blackberry, you can use any Blackberry. There's nothing that is so drastically different from device to device. And I'm jealous of that--with Android we get so many different form factors and different software built on top of our OS that you have to almost re-learn an Android device every time. RIM makes sure every Blackberry user can easily pick up any Blackberry and just go.

To analogize it, Blackberry is really the McDonalds of smartphones. Sure it may not be the highest quality of food or offer the most variety but it's always consistent. You eat at McDonald's in California or in Florida or in New York or even in Canada, you know what to expect. That's Blackberry--from the Curves to the Bolds--it might not offer the highest quality of experience or different form factors but you know what to expect. And really, that's saying something. In order to build a device that's consistently better each year but still falls in line with previous iterations, that means you absolutely built a great base to build on. That's where the 'crack' lies, at the core base of Blackberry. No other phone matches its nod to its history.

Final Thoughts

If you're a reader of CrackBerry.com, you should be well aware of Crackberry Kevin's Hierarchy of Smartphone Needs. If you haven't heard of it, go read it and take it in. We're sure that your pyramid of needs is different from his but a lot of it makes sense. Your device should fit your priorities. If you're a heavy Google user invested in Google Voice, Gmail, and the like, Android is really your best bet. If it's strict, fast and quick communication that you need, Blackberry makes a great case for itself. If AT&T doesn't work for you, don't get an AT&T phone. And so on.

And that's really what you learn from doing these Smartphone Round Robins. There is no perfect device for everyone. If you're insanely, ridiculously lucky, maybe there is a perfect device for you. But for the most part, if you can find a device that best fits your priorities, go with that device. If you want a device that browses the internet, Blackberry is not for you. If you want a device that communicates extremely well, Blackberry it is.

So what the future holds for Blackberry (and really any smartphone platform) is what device can combine enough core needs better than any other device. If Blackberry fixes their browser and introduces a touchscreen device with front facing keyboard, it's definitely going to be a device worth reckoning. But if it takes too long, Android just might pass it up.

 
There are 14 comments

Ty says:

I think this review is spot on. I switched to the Droid on Nov. 6 after 3 years with BB, Storm 9530 being my most recent one. Will always have love for my crackberries, but the OS just needs to be completely redone. It's 2010. The OS honestly hasn't changed much since the BB 7250 I had. Same concepts, same way of doing things, just prettier icons. Really hope RIM steps it up. Not that I'm leaving Android EVER now, just sayin :-)

jdella681 says:

Agreed. I think the os across any blackberry is straightforward. Being a user if the curve, tour, and storm I do miss it a little but not enought to go back lol.. droid for now ;)

Bill W says:

Good review, but you missed some essential points. I tried the Moto Droid and returned it for a BB Storm 2. Its a beautifully made device. For me its essential to have buttons for app launching and pause/mute (especially in the car) which no Android device seems to have. The Moto Droid doesn't even have phone buttons, making it an exercise in frustration to make a phone call. Plus, the whole Android "turn it on then swipe to unlock" thing gets old really fast. With the BB, you just pull the damn thing out of your holster and its on and ready to go. These small usability issues make a huge difference to me.

Pretty spot on review but you failed to mention the constant battery pulls and memory leaks that drove the majority of former bb users to the droid. I am a young biz man and was excited when I got my first bb (pearl) after using a treo for a year. I loved it for a few weeks, until isssues arrose ranging from constant freezing, leaks, daily battery pulls, all the way to hardware problems such as the flash on the camera staying on whenever the phone was on, too the phone not accepting a charge even after cleaning. I went through 3 in 6 monts, then vzw gave me a free curve. Same thing first few weeks were great and then memory and os issues. 6 monthes later after going through 3 curves, vzw gave me a storm...same issues, but arguably worse then the pearl, that's how bad it was. The finally straw was when they sent the ota bing app, while I was on a very important call. The phone went nuts, drained the 40% battery I had left and was unworkable the next day.

Keep the bb for more than a week and try to give it heavy usage both messaging and multitasking...it will develop issues of some kind. As a mid 20 biz man I wanted bb to make my life easier yet it mostly frustrated me, as I spent more time searching for solutions to problems it created rather than solving problems It was designed to attack.

I wanted a biz phone but with equal ability as an all purpose device. bb is all biz the iphone is all entertainment, droid is a great blend of both. There's things I wish it handled like bb and things I wish it did like the iphone, but with all things said while the droid doesn't dominate or specialize in any respective field like bb & iphone both do, it handles the key aspects of both and does so consistantly and sufficently. My life isn't solely comprised of either work or play and the droid meets my balanced lifestyle

Bill W says:

Well, I'm certainly not having those issues and never did on my Pearl 8130 either. I did have issues on the Droid such as it not connecting over Bluetooth to my car and multiple audio streams playing at one time which drove me nuts.

Good review; I think it's probably the most accurate one about BBs I've read in a long time.
I've been using an antiquated BB 8320 (old Curve) on T-Mo for over 2 years now (since Dec. 2007), and I can say without doubt that RIM really needs to get their "stuff" together when it comes to their BB OS, especially the browser. The BB browser is agonizingly slow! Even the 9700 seems kind-of slow by today's standards (tho it is a big improvement). In fact, the main reason I've been strongly considering getting an Android phone is the BB platform's lack of a decent browser. I know, there are other browsers out there for the BB; I've downloaded Bolt, and it didn't work for me very well (still way too laggy and slow), possibly due to the limitations of my old Curve's hardware (can only support up to BB OS 4.5, but not 5.0).
You're right about BBs being communication devices 1st, and everything else is 2nd or 3rd. I love how my BB notifies me instantly whenever I get some incoming e-mail, or text, or call; notifications just come in without a problem, as long as RIM isn't having a dreaded BB outage, which I won't even get started on!
And the trackball sucks big time, at least on the BBs. I can't even count how many times my Curve's trackball stops rolling and I have to disassemble it and clean it (a toothpick or two works best, so you won't scratch it). And I keep having to pull my transparency off my screen fairly frequently as well, to get all the dust off the screen itself (a thick guitar pick works best for that). It gets so dirty so fast! And my hands don't get that dirty! I probably have to do it at least once or twice a month, which is a pain. I second that emotion on the Nexus One, that it should've had a trackpad (like the BB 9700) rather than the trackball; no moving parts and a lot less maintenance. (Quick question: Does anyone know, how the Nexus One's trackball holds up compared to the BB's? I've heard that they're better but I want to confirm that before I get a Nexus One.)
The keyboard on my old 8320 is great, tho. I actually like the feel of it better than the 9700's. In my search for a newer, better phone, I went to T-Mo and played around with one, but the 9700 had such a small screen (same size as my Curve but way better resolution), and its keyboard just felt a bit too small and cramped for me, especially with my big hands! If RIM would've kept the old Bold 9000's larger form factor (and larger screen), I probably would've gotten one, as it was so much easier to type on. That was the reason I got my old Curve back in 2007, because at that time there was no other keyboard out there that just felt right for me to type on (I typed this on it too). For those who just have to have a physical (hard) keyboard, the Android phones need one that has the same feel and tactile feedback as a BB's. But at the rate new Android phones are coming out now, that will probably happen soon.
Nowadays, I'm more interested in having a touchscreen, as I love the far greater versatilty and big-finger-friendliness of a landscape-mode onscreen keyboard. The BB Storm 2 is a big step in the right direction on RIM's part, but it's still hindered by their archaic BB OS and browser. And AFAIK, it's only on VZW, which won't work for me.
I've also been wanting an iPhone since they came out, but since it still doesn't look like their exclusivity with AT&T will be ending soon (especially after Apple announced their iPad and its exclusive AT&T 3G plan... big disappointment), now I'm leaning even more toward an Android phone as a worthy successor to my old BB (which I'll still keep as a back-up phone).
I really like the versatility and practically endless customizability of the Android platform, and having an unlocked phone that I can use on whichever network I want, and make truly "my own," with I couldn't really do with my BB or an iPhone.
So, since I'm off contract with T-Mo, I will probably get a Nexus One, as soon as Google/HTC/T-Mo get all the bugs worked out of it and I can afford it.
Sorry for writing a "small book" here; just wanted to relate my long-term overall love/hate experience with the BB platform.
PEACE

Good review; I think it's probably the most accurate one about BBs I've read in a long time.
I've been using an antiquated BB 8320 (old Curve) on T-Mo for over 2 years now (since Dec. 2007), and I can say without doubt that RIM really needs to get their "stuff" together when it comes to their BB OS, especially the browser. The BB browser is agonizingly slow! Even the 9700 seems kind-of slow by today's standards (tho it is a big improvement). In fact, the main reason I've been strongly considering getting an Android phone is the BB platform's lack of a decent browser. I know, there are other browsers out there for the BB; I've downloaded Bolt, and it didn't work for me very well (still way too laggy and slow), possibly due to the limitations of my old Curve's hardware (can only support up to BB OS 4.5, but not 5.0).
You're right about BBs being communication devices 1st, and everything else is 2nd or 3rd. I love how my BB notifies me instantly whenever I get some incoming e-mail, or text, or call; notifications just come in without a problem, as long as RIM isn't having a dreaded BB outage, which I won't even get started on!
And the trackball sucks big time, at least on the BBs. I can't even count how many times my Curve's trackball stops rolling and I have to disassemble it and clean it (a toothpick or two works best, so you won't scratch it). And I keep having to pull my transparency off my screen fairly frequently as well, to get all the dust off the screen itself (a thick guitar pick works best for that). It gets so dirty so fast! And my hands don't get that dirty! I probably have to do it at least once or twice a month, which is a pain. I second that emotion on the Nexus One, that it should've had a trackpad (like the BB 9700) rather than the trackball; no moving parts and a lot less maintenance. (Quick question: Does anyone know, how the Nexus One's trackball holds up compared to the BB's? I've heard that they're better but I want to confirm that before I get a Nexus One.)
The keyboard on my old 8320 is great, tho. I actually like the feel of it better than the 9700's. In my search for a newer, better phone, I went to T-Mo and played around with one, but the 9700 had such a small screen (same size as my Curve but way better resolution), and its keyboard just felt a bit too small and cramped for me, especially with my big hands! If RIM would've kept the old Bold 9000's larger form factor (and larger screen), I probably would've gotten one, as it was so much easier to type on. That was the reason I got my old Curve back in 2007, because at that time there was no other keyboard out there that just felt right for me to type on (I typed this on it too). For those who just have to have a physical (hard) keyboard, the Android phones need one that has the same feel and tactile feedback as a BB's. But at the rate new Android phones are coming out now, that will probably happen soon.
Nowadays, I'm more interested in having a touchscreen, as I love the far greater versatilty and big-finger-friendliness of a landscape-mode onscreen keyboard. The BB Storm 2 is a big step in the right direction on RIM's part, but it's still hindered by their archaic BB OS and browser. And AFAIK, it's only on VZW, which won't work for me.
I've also been wanting an iPhone since they came out, but since it still doesn't look like their exclusivity with AT&T will be ending soon (especially after Apple announced their iPad and its exclusive AT&T 3G plan... big disappointment), now I'm leaning even more toward an Android phone as a worthy successor to my old BB (which I'll still keep as a back-up phone).
I really like the versatility and practically endless customizability of the Android platform, and having an unlocked phone that I can use on whichever network I want, and make truly "my own," with I couldn't really do with my BB or an iPhone.
So, since I'm off contract with T-Mo, I will probably get a Nexus One, as soon as Google/HTC/T-Mo get all the bugs worked out of it and I can afford it.
Sorry for writing a "small book" here; just wanted to relate my long-term overall love/hate experience with the BB platform.
PEACE

Good review; I think it's probably the most accurate one about BBs I've read in a long time.
I've been using an antiquated BB 8320 (old Curve) on T-Mo for over 2 years now (since Dec. 2007), and I can say without doubt that RIM really needs to get their "stuff" together when it comes to their BB OS, especially the browser. The BB browser is agonizingly slow! Even the 9700 seems kind-of slow by today's standards (tho it is a big improvement). In fact, the main reason I've been strongly considering getting an Android phone is the BB platform's lack of a decent browser. I know, there are other browsers out there for the BB; I've downloaded Bolt, and it didn't work for me very well (still way too laggy and slow), possibly due to the limitations of my old Curve's hardware (can only support up to BB OS 4.5, but not 5.0).
You're right about BBs being communication devices 1st, and everything else is 2nd or 3rd. I love how my BB notifies me instantly whenever I get some incoming e-mail, or text, or call; notifications just come in without a problem, as long as RIM isn't having a dreaded BB outage, which I won't even get started on!
And the trackball sucks big time, at least on the BBs. I can't even count how many times my Curve's trackball stops rolling and I have to disassemble it and clean it (a toothpick or two works best, so you won't scratch it). And I keep having to pull my transparency off my screen fairly frequently as well, to get all the dust off the screen itself (a thick guitar pick works best for that). It gets so dirty so fast! And my hands don't get that dirty! I probably have to do it at least once or twice a month, which is a pain. I second that emotion on the Nexus One, that it should've had a trackpad (like the BB 9700) rather than the trackball; no moving parts and a lot less maintenance. (Quick question: Does anyone know, how the Nexus One's trackball holds up compared to the BB's? I've heard that they're better but I want to confirm that before I get a Nexus One.)
The keyboard on my old 8320 is great, tho. I actually like the feel of it better than the 9700's. In my search for a newer, better phone, I went to T-Mo and played around with one, but the 9700 had such a small screen (same size as my Curve but way better resolution), and its keyboard just felt a bit too small and cramped for me, especially with my big hands! If RIM would've kept the old Bold 9000's larger form factor (and larger screen), I probably would've gotten one, as it was so much easier to type on. That was the reason I got my old Curve back in 2007, because at that time there was no other keyboard out there that just felt right for me to type on (I typed this on it too). For those who just have to have a physical (hard) keyboard, the Android phones need one that has the same feel and tactile feedback as a BB's. But at the rate new Android phones are coming out now, that will probably happen soon.
Nowadays, I'm more interested in having a touchscreen, as I love the far greater versatilty and big-finger-friendliness of a landscape-mode onscreen keyboard. The BB Storm 2 is a big step in the right direction on RIM's part, but it's still hindered by their archaic BB OS and browser. And AFAIK, it's only on VZW, which won't work for me.
I've also been wanting an iPhone since they came out, but since it still doesn't look like their exclusivity with AT&T will be ending soon (especially after Apple announced their iPad and its exclusive AT&T 3G plan... big disappointment), now I'm leaning even more toward an Android phone as a worthy successor to my old BB (which I'll still keep as a back-up phone).
I really like the versatility and practically endless customizability of the Android platform, and having an unlocked phone that I can use on whichever network I want, and make truly "my own," with I couldn't really do with my BB or an iPhone.
So, since I'm off contract with T-Mo, I will probably get a Nexus One, as soon as Google/HTC/T-Mo get all the bugs worked out of it and I can afford it.
Sorry for writing a "small book" here; just wanted to relate my long-term overall love/hate experience with the BB platform.
PEACE

Anonymous says:

here we go again....round robin these nutz. Blackberrys are outdated. there market sux, operating system sux. to think with all that money they made they cant come up with a better phone.

step up yr game, homos.

Aw, crap! Somehow I accidentally posted 3 times! I'm really sorry about that; I'm not sure how it happened. After I finished typing it, I pressed "Save" and nothing happened; it showed no sign at all that it actually worked... After 3 attempts, I just said "screw it" and gave up. My BB was lagging like it was 1999 (see what I mean about this outdated BB OS?)
Again, I apologize for the triple post. How do I delete the extras?
PEACE

Anonymous says:

Nice review and overview of what BB is all about. I think the most interesting thing about the round robin is that it points out how different the needs of different people are when it comes to smartphones.

I tried a BB Tour for a solid month and honestly really liked it at first. The form factor is very similar to the 9700, just not quite as much juice under the hood, but it was nice and fast. I totally agree that BB is a great phone first, excellent email and texting device, and everything else is fairly weak compared to other smartphones (worst browsing, smaller screen for multimedia, text driven submenus, etc). The lack of a touchscreen drove me nuts after several weeks since I felt that I could have been so much faster by just touching the screen to execute something instead of using the trackball and clicking - the touchpad on the 9700 is way better, but still limited without a touchscreen. I felt more productive and could multitask on my series of Treos prior to this, so I returned the Tour after a month.

I almost went to an Android Hero, but my business needs are such that WinMo suits me better and the Touch Pro2 is working out great. The Hero would have been nice as well, I'm sure, and I like the flexibility of Android. But, it seems that Android at this point is more suited to users that aren't as tied to MS Office/Outlook work when on the go as WinMo users tend to be. BB does a nice job of MS Office/Outlook too, but having a nice and fast browser along with the large touchscreen on my TP2 is great when traveling. All smartphones do a great job these days of pushing multiple email accounts (or fast pulling when needed), so BB email is overhyped IMHO having used WinMo, BB and WebOS.

Although I haven't spent ownership time with Android, I've played around with it a ton and think it will continue to improve this year so maybe I'll take a shot at it. HTC Obsession is looking nice.

Storm2 feels ridiculous to me compared to any other smartphone options.

elemental says:

I kept my BB Tour and added a Droid. I use the Tour for work and the Droid for everything else.

I've had issues over the months with the Tour, such as battery pulls, freezing, general issues, however for a "work" phone the Tour is a definite tool. I've finally gotten it to a point where it has been stable for about 8 weeks.

The Droid is hands down the best "gadget" I've ever put my hands on. I've not measured, but think I've reduced my time in front of a laptop or PC by at least 50%.

For work and productivity, I'll be keeping a BB of some kind for years to come.

For everything else, some sort of an Android based gadget is the way to go.

corydunbar says:

it was sad to seen my Blackberry storm go, but now i'm only looking ahead with my Droid

allen832008 says:

Great review of the BlackberryOS. As a new Droid Eris user and longtime Pearl 8130 owner, I agree with the majority of the review. I do miss the flawless email integration with BB but the overall experience of Android is so much more updated and appealing to me. Android is easier to browse the web by far and really just more fun than the BB OS.