Skip to main content

This might be the year Samsung actually leaps Google in photo quality

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra Black
Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra Black (Image credit: Nick Sutrich / Android Central)

Samsung's new Adaptive Pixel technology is exactly what the company needed to finally beat Google at its own game — smartphone photography.

With Adaptive Pixel technology, Samsung is taking what it learned from last year's multi-frame capture software upgrade and adding in some impressive new innovations that could make a huge difference for all Galaxy S22 users.

That last part is particularly important because it means that you don't have to spend all that extra money on a Galaxy S22 Ultra just to experience Samsung's latest big feature. That means more of this year's best Samsung phones have all the best features and the best price for you.

Google may have pioneered multi-frame capture on Android with HDR+ way back on the Nexus 5, but Samsung has finally figured out a way to one-up Google and deliver better camera hardware at the same time.

Throw it in the bin

Samsung Galaxy S22 Camera Hump White

Source: Nick Sutrich / Android Central (Image credit: Source: Nick Sutrich / Android Central)

While a number of people have begun to jump on the "smartphone cameras are good enough" bandwagon, Samsung is still dead-set on the Galaxy S22 camera winning the award for best smartphone camera quality. For people like me, who often pick their smartphones based on a camera that can deliver the best image quality, that's exactly what I want to hear.

While megapixels can make a well-lit photo look crisper and full of little details, it can also bring a lot of noise into an image.

So what, exactly, can Adaptive Pixel do for your photos? First, let's take a look at what the other guys are doing.

For years, camera sensors have grown in size and megapixel count. But, while megapixels can make a well-lit photo look crisper and full of little details, it can also bring a lot of noise into an image. That's particularly true with lower lighting conditions.

Simply put, a smaller pixel cannot physically absorb as much light as a larger one. Think of how dark a large room with one tiny window would be versus a room with one giant window and you'll get the idea.

So companies like Samsung, Google, Huawei, and others have turned to two main ways to alleviate this problem: pixel binning, and multi-frame capture.

Both methods have produced spectacular results but often falter at one key point: most phones, despite their massive sensor sizes, still output a 12MP image.

Most phones, despite their massive sensor sizes, still output a 12MP image.

While 12MP is fine for sharing to social media or viewing on a smartphone screen, it's not so great for printing images or zooming in to see the finer details.

With Adaptive Pixel technology, Samsung is using both multi-frame capture and pixel-binning, as well as a third brand new concept: adding in the raw 50MP or 108MP image — that's the difference between the Galaxy S22/22+ and the S22 Ultra — to the final product to bring fine detail back to the image.

The missing details

Galaxy S22 Adaptive Pixel Mockup

Source: Nick Sutrich / Android Central (Image credit: Source: Nick Sutrich / Android Central)

What we've been shown of Adaptive Pixel so far is stunning. Essentially, by taking the bright 12MP photo and combining it with the detailed — and more naturally-lit — higher resolution photo, the Galaxy S22 should deliver not only more detailed photos in any lighting condition, but also ones that are correctly lit.

Despite multi-frame capture and pixel-binning providing brighter and less noisy photos, the end result often is a photo that looks unnaturally bright.

See, despite multi-frame capture and pixel-binning providing brighter and less noisy photos, the end result often is a photo that looks unnaturally bright. While this is good for some situations, it's not ideal for most.

When people take pictures, they hope — and maybe even expect — the camera to be able to capture the scene exactly as the eye sees it. That means no brighter, no darker, and certainly not less detailed.

Samsung's new approach could guarantee that all three of these conditions are met far more often than any other smartphone has been able to deliver. While we love the Pixel 6 for its camera, it often gets the look of a nighttime scene wrong, even if it is the best at a technical level.

The mockup I made above is similar to one Samsung showed us and should get the point across. The full-resolution 108MP photo is naturally a darker photo since it doesn't use all the tricks we already talked about to create a brighter image.

The result (of an adaptive pixel photo) is one that combines the best of both worlds into a beautifully-lit, well-balanced photo with tons of detail.

Meanwhile, the pixel-binned multi-frame photo will be a lower resolution but incredibly bright — many times, unnaturally so.

The result is a 108MP or 50MP photo — depending on if you're using an S22 Ultra or an S22/S22+ — that combines the best of both worlds into a beautifully-lit, well-balanced photo with tons of detail.

The reliability factor

Samsung Galaxy S22 Plus Burgundy Case Camera

Source: Nick Sutrich / Android Central (Image credit: Source: Nick Sutrich / Android Central)

As far as I can tell, Samsung has all the technical details in order in a way they never have before. But Samsung has always had the best camera hardware and often some of the better camera software, especially when it comes to speed.

Samsung hasn't always had the "reliability factor" on its side, however.

Samsung users haven't always trusted that their phones could actually capture a moment when it was most needed. For that guarantee, you'd often need a Pixel or an iPhone.

By that, I mean that Samsung users haven't always trusted that their phones could actually capture a moment when it was most needed. For that guarantee, you'd often need a Pixel or an iPhone.

But the Galaxy S21 and the rest of Samsung's 2021 portfolio made massive strides to help fix this trust issue. There have been dozens of times where I was sure my Galaxy Z Fold 3 wouldn't be able to adequately capture a photo, only to be pleasantly surprised that it came out better than I had even hoped for — and certainly better than I expected.

This year, Samsung has added even more AI-powered capabilities to the Galaxy S22 line that should help further sew trust into the seams of its latest powerhouse phones.

First off, that new Adaptive Pixel feature is fully automated. That means you won't have to worry about switching modes — or, rather, forgetting to switch to the right mode — just to use the best new feature.

That new Adaptive Pixel feature is fully automated.

Second, Samsung has worked further on tasks like face identification, which should help keep faces nice and clear in shots with lots of motion.

For selfies, Samsung added two new features: AI stereo depth map and night portrait selfies. Night portrait selfies will help make higher quality night shots possible by further utilizing multi-frame capture for the front camera.

AI stereo depth map will ensure that those portrait shots get more accurate background blurring by using AI to identify objects around a person's face. That data is then used to help the phone better process what's actually in the background instead of smearing hair and other articles of clothing that shouldn't be blurred.

Galaxy S22 Ultra users also have a second intermediary telephoto camera for those times you might zoom in between 3x and 10x. It's yet another reason why Samsung's efforts to make the best possible smartphone camera will end up paying off in everyday situations.

Samsung is almost assuredly going to be the smartphone vendor to pick in 2022 for the best camera experience.

While many of these efforts might seem superfluous on the surface, they all add up to an experience that's better than anyone is likely expecting. They show why Samsung is almost assuredly going to be the smartphone vendor to pick in 2022 for the best camera and why that award doesn't just mean the best hardware.

It means the best overall experience.

Nicholas Sutrich
Senior Content Producer — Smartphones & VR
Nick started with DOS and NES and uses those fond memories of floppy disks and cartridges to fuel his opinions on modern tech. Whether it's VR, smart home gadgets, or something else that beeps and boops, he's been writing about it since 2011. Reach him on Twitter or Instagram @Gwanatu
15 Comments
  • This sounds like a real computational photography advance. I've been a fan of Samsung's less dramatic night mode relative to the Pixels, for exactly the reason the author states - Pixel night mode images are just unnaturally bright. If Samsung can make the best of both worlds - high res, correctly lit night time images - it's going to be a dramatic upgrade, on the order of the original HDR advances pioneered by Google with the Pixel.
  • Where's Beno been, is he an iSheep now?
  • Let me know when they can take a picture of a child that is not 100% still indoors as well as Pixels (or iPhones) can do.
  • Not children, but if you go to the pixel 6 forum you will see some terrible photos of cats indoors. And have a friend with a border collie and he gets some great photos (granted outdoors) of the dog running and that is all that damn dog does is run.
    Although I admit pixels take good photos, I have to say, there is more to a phone than the camera(s) such as being a phone.
  • Burst shot mode works well for this. That's my go-to for action shots.
  • How about now? Yesteryear? The day you didn't drink too much of the fake news kool-aid?
  • @RETG: For me as a parent of young children, how well my phone takes photos is my #1 priority, (haven't tried cats) considering any other phone I would choose does is good enough at being a phone for me.
    @Michael: I'm not a fan of relying on bursts, because I'm way too indecisive to choose a best shot, and then my phone just gets filled up with way too many photos
    @Hans: Don't know what kool-aid you're speaking of. I only recently shifted to the Pixel after years of Samsung. Photos of my kids indoors are night and day, and I've seen plenty of others share this opinion.
  • @lcs101: totally get you about sorting through the burst mode shots. Google Photos has a photo picker for burst mode that picks the best shot. Works pretty well.
  • No phone can capture the speeding bullet that is my 3yo.
  • Maybe I'm oversimplifying things here, but it seems these 'camera wars' have made everyone "pseudo photo and camera experts." Our standards are way higher than necessary anymore. The VAST majority of pictures taken are just shared, viewed on phone or posted to social media. Not many people are making poster sized, edited high quality prints.
  • It's still nice to get detailed, high-resolution images because you can COMPLETELY tell the difference when viewing them on a 32" 4K monitor like the one I have. The shots I take with the 64MP resolution on my Galaxy S20+ come out amazing under the right lighting.
  • One thing many fail to mention with Samsung cameras especially using Exynos chip. In shadows especially shooting into sunlight there is a huge amount of mushiness,colour noise it's horrible. Have seen this since S10 days. I didn't see this mush and noise on S20FE Snapdragon version. I hope this is sorted with S22 Ultra
  • ADAPTIVE PIXEL, that is one amazing feature.
  • My 2 cents is that it's good to have all this advances in phone photography and it will spur competition. No matter what brand of phone you use it's always a good idea to improve on your photo's with easy to use editing software for all users no matter their expertise level. Google photo's and Snapseed are two that come to mind and have an easy learning curve and results in much improved photo's and even fixes older pics taken with less than stellar hardware.
  • It is real world every day photos that interest me most. Samsung phones can already take great photos (relatively speaking) of landscapes or cityscapes etc. Reviewers massively over-index the zoom IMO, a 3 or 4x zoom for portraits is nice but I personally could not care less how sharp the walls of building are from 5 miles away! The real question for me is can the S22/S22U take photos of my pets without smudging the fur or photos of my kids indoors without them coming out blurry.