Headlines

2 years ago

Acer said to be bringing CloudMobile smartphone with Ice Cream Sandwich to Mobile World Congress

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Back during CES 2012 Acer showed off something called Acercloud, a new service from them much like Apple's iCloud services in the fact it will keep documents and media libraries in the cloud with sync being offered across their line of smartphones and tablets.

Jumping forward to the present, Acer apparently just won the iF Product Design Award for outstanding achievement in design with a AcerCloud enabled device called the Acer CloudMobile but the full details and specs surrounding the device are still pretty slim.

What we did learn though is that the Acer CloudMobile will be the first device coming equipped with AcerCloud services, it will be packing Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich in a body less then 10MM thick with a 4.3-Inch HD display and Dolby audio and to top it all off, it's expected to see a full unveiling at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. We'll see.

Source: Pocket Lint, iF Product Design

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2 years ago

Galaxy Mini 2 appears, offers modest improvements at low-end

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As well as expanding its mid-range portfolio with the Galaxy S Advance, it looks like Samsung is preparing a refresh of its entry-level hardware. A couple of promotional shots for a device dubbed the "Galaxy Mini 2" have leaked out online, showing some modest improvements on the basic hardware of last year's Galaxy Mini.

The most significant change is the upping of the screen's resolution -- from QVGA to HVGA. This was one of our biggest complaints about that device, so we're hoping the extra pixel density will result in a little less eye strain when using the Mini 2. For what it's worth, the LCD itself is a little larger, at 3.3 inches compared to 3.2 on the original.

As we said, spec bumps elsewhere are pretty minor -- the CPU gets a boost from 600MHz to 800MHz, while internal storage is increased to a total of 3GB. HSDPA speeds remain at 7.2Mbps, though unfortunately there's no mention of HSUPA support. And on the software side of you've got Android 2.3 Gingerbread, likely backed up by Samsung's TouchWiz UX.

Though the gap between super-high-end and entry-level phones is growing wider, the updated specs on the Galaxy Mini 2 should make it a a reasonable device for those on a budget. According to today's leak, the Galaxy Mini 2 will start shipping internationally later this month.

Source: GSMArena

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2 years ago

'Berry pink' Galaxy Note reportedly coming by early March

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Want to feel even more awkward and self-conscious making calls on your Galaxy Note in public? Why not pick up the upcoming "berry pink" version of Samsung's 5.3-inch monster. It's reportedly launching internationally during the ninth week of the year -- that's last week of February (or "crazy week" as we like to call it around here).

The leaked promotional shot, obtained by GSMArena, reminds us of the pink Galaxy S II. Like that device, the pink Galaxy Note comes with a pink back cover, a pink bezel, and presumably a pink S Pen to boot. And we're talking bright pink. Discrete this thing most certainly is not.

In any case, it's worth remembering that this pink version is based on the GT-N7000 -- the international Galaxy Note, which has different internals to the North American LTE version. Somehow we don't see this color arriving stateside any time soon, but if you're up for importing it, then the girliest phone ever should set you back around $790.

Source: GSMArena

 

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2 years ago

Unannounced HTC device emerges sporting ICS, Verizon 4G LTE

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Following last week's HTC Ville leakage, a new, unannounced HTC smartphone running Ice Cream Sandwich with Sense 4.0, and a Droid Incredible-style back panel has appeared online. The photos above (and a few more) have surfaced over on PhoneArena, suggesting that a 4G LTE-powered Droid Incredible 2 successor could be coming to big red in the future. While there's no Verizon branding on the chassis (likely due to this being a prototype), that's unmistakably the carrier's 4G LTE logo in the first image.

Additional images show a device running Android 4.0.1 Ice Cream Sandwich alongside HTC Sense 4.0 -- the same updated Sense experience that we previously seen in the Ville leaks. Hardware-wise, HTC's mystery slab is powered by a 1.2GHz dual-core CPU with 1GB of RAM. There's a 8MP shooter on the back, as well as a VGA front-facer, and the screen is apparently an AMOLED offering rather than SLCD, which was used in many 2011 HTC products.

All in all, it looks like we've got ourselves a CDMA/LTE counterpart to the HTC Ville, which we'll likely see at MWC in a couple of weeks. We're not expecting to see any Verizon-specific stuff in Spain, but if we had to guess, we'd say this thing is a likely candidate for an unveiling at CTIA next month. You'll find more pics over at the source link.

Source: PhoneArena

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2 years ago

Phones4U to offer on-contract handset upgrades every six months

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A common issue when picking up a new smartphone on an 18 or 24-month contract is that your device will almost always be obsolete well before the end of your service agreement. This is especially true in the Android space, where manufacturers seem to be continually one-upping each other (and themselves) with new high-end devices every few months.

Independent UK retailer Phones4U has today launched a new service which could allow customers to keep up-to-date with the latest handsets throughout the life of their contract. JUMP ("Just Upgrade My Phone") splits customers' monthly bills into a phone service part, payable to the carrier, and a "JUMP service agreement" bill, payable to Phones4U. Then, after six or more months, customers can choose to upgrade their handset, trading in their existing phone in the process. The remaining JUMP balance that's payable until the end of the contract is then offset against the price of the phone, and a new handset can be chosen, the cost of which is added to the JUMP balance.

The bottom line is that you'd be able to upgrade your phone during the life of your contract, in exchange for a somewhat increased monthly fee.

It takes a while to wrap your head around what's actually going on, but effectively customers are being given the chance to re-jig the part of their monthly payment that covers the cost of the phone. It's probably not going to be economical to upgrade three times within a 24-month contract, but it is at least more affordable than blowing £500 on a new handset in the middle of your contract.

JUMP is launching in Phones4U stores from today, and online from May. We've got the full presser after the jump.

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2 years ago

Motorola Droid 4 available now on Verizon for $199 on contract

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The Motorola Droid 4 is now available from Verizon's website (and will be in stores in just a few short hours) for $199 on contract. As the name implies, this is the fourth phone in the line that for all intents and purposes put Android on the map.

As you'll recall from our hands-on at CES, the Droid 4 takes the classic Droid stylings -- a larger screen and a physical keyboard -- and refines them even further. From the front, it looks like a cousin to the new Droid RAZR MAXX, albeit a tad smaller with a 4-inch display at qHD (540x960) resolution. Slide open that 4-inch display and you've got what might well be the best physical keyboard on any smartphone. The keys are backlit and laser-cut and are extremely easy to navigate. 

One odd feature of the Droid 4 is on the backside. You can remove the battery cover -- and must do so if you want to get to the microSIM card (which is what provides the 4G LTE data) and microSD card. But it takes a weird little unlocking tool (included with the phone) to do so. But even then you can't actually remove the 1785 mAh battery -- at least not without likely breaking anything. That could be a deal-breaker for many. Check out our Droid 4 walkthrough video for more on that.

The phone's running Android 2.3.6, and Verizon is already promising to update it to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Other specs of note:

  • 1.2GHz dual-core processor
  • 1GB RAM
  • 8MP rear camera
  • 1.3MP front-facing camerea
  • Serve as a 4G LTE hot spot for up to eight other devices.

And that's just the tip of the iceberg. Look for our full Droid 4 review in the coming days.

Source: Verizon Wireless

More: Droid 4 specs, Droid 4 forums

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2 years ago

Australia to get LG Prada 3.0 in April, coming to Vodafone

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The global rollout of the latest in the LG Prada family continues, with the news that Vodafone Australia will be offering the device from April. 

The release of the Gingerbread powered device will be exclusive to Vodafone, and is being launched for use on its 850MHz network. RRP is said to be AUS$799, but the carrier has indicated that exact pricing and availability will be announced in "coming weeks." 

Prada branded phone not enough? A range of branded accessories will be accompanying the launch to include cradles, Bluetooth headsets and phone pouches.

In other LG Prada news, the went on wider release at retailers in the UK this week, following a short exclusivity period with Phones4U.

Source: Ausdroid

More: Hands on with the LG Prada 3.0

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2 years ago

LG Phoenix Gingerbread update now available via LG Support Tool

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We've got good news, and we've got bad news.  The good part first -- The LG Phoenix has a shiny new Gingerbread update waiting for it, bumping a bit of new life into one of last years best "beginner" Android phones.  You'll get all the goodness that sits under the hood in Gingerbread, and because LG is light on the changes you'll see a lot of the new goodies as well.  Everyone loves an update, no matter how long they have had to wait.

Now for the bad news.  You'll have to use LG's notoriously bad Mobile Support Tool to update the phone.  It's Windows only, and has a pretty bad track record when it comes to working as it should.  I'll go on record saying it's as bad or worse than Kies, and I hate Kies.  

Anyhoo, if you're rocking an LG Phoenix, a Windows computer, and can set up drivers and hardware, grab the update.  Full instructions (you're gonna need them) are at the source link, and always shout out in the forums with questions.

Source: LG

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2 years ago

Google Wallet under attack again - this time by a feature, not a hack

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Ahhh, Google Wallet. It's a giant target, both because it involves the almighty dollar and because people love to go after Google. This being the case, we're seeing an old trick being rehashed that will give someone access to your prepaid Google Wallet card. It's not a hack, per se, nor is it new -- but it's a poor design choice that keeps the prepaid card tied to the phone hardware instead of with your Google Wallet account, which is more sandboxed. It goes like this:

  • Find a Nexus phone with NFC laying around somewhere
  • Wipe the app data on Google Wallet and enter a new PIN
  • Profit?

So what you're hearing about now is what happens when you clear the app data from Google Wallet. That means stored information -- the PIN you entered -- is no longer attached to the app on your phone. Next time time you open Google Wallet, you're told to enter a new PIN number.

And then it once again asks which Google Account you want to tie in to Google Wallet. Because you're still logged in to you Google Account, suddenly the phone says "Hey! I recognize that user name! And you must be that user on your phone! Here's the free $10 Google's already given you, or whatever else you've added, too."

Thing is, in the example you're hearing about now, you're not actually that user. Someone has stolen your phone. And they can get to the Google Prepaid Card. And that's actually a feature that's documented in Google Wallet's Switching Devices help pages. Emphasis ours.

Your Google Prepaid Card balance may be transferred if you have completed your account registration. Contact us for more assistance.

There are a lot of ways this could be fixed. Maybe the best, but likely the least popular among users, would be to implement an Exchange-like security policy across the entire device where an ID and a PIN must be entered to do things like unlock the phone, or change settings. It would seem easier to secure the entire phone that it would be to change the architecture of the payment system, and if nobody can unlock your phone or get into the Wallet app settings (to clear data), this problem is solved. The new problem is that nobody likes to have to enter a PIN, and Android hackers will find a way around this in short order and call it a "feature" of their ROM. Hopefully Google has people smarter than I tackling these types of issues.

In the meantime, set some sort of screen lock.  Just do it.  If someone finds your phone, and can't get in, they can't wipe the data on your Wallet and change the PIN.  Your Google Wallet, unlike your old wallet, can be locked down.  Hit the break to see a video of this one in action.

Source: Smartphone Champ

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2 years ago

Motorola Droid 4 has an unlockable ... battery cover?

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So here's the Motorola Droid 4. We're about to do our thing to it as only we can in our full Droid 4 review, but here it is in a nutshell: Fast device, blue display, good build, great keyboard, and the craziest damn battery cover contraption we've ever seen.

Check this out: The little plastic thing you see here -- sized up against a 2005 California quarter -- is the battery cover unlocking mechanism tool device thingy, or BCUMTDT for short. It's not unlike the iPhone's "SIM unlock tool," which is a fancy way of saying "thing you put in a hole to remove some other thing." It's craziness, we say.

What's hiding under that battery cover? Well, not a battery, for one. As you no doubt by now know from our hands-on with the Droid 4 at CES, you can't actually remove the battery from the phone.

So why bother with the battery cover unlocking mechanism tool device? There are other goodies tucked away under there -- mainly the micro SIM card for 4G LTE data, the microSD card -- and one last surprise, which we'll uncover in the video after the break.

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2 years ago

TELUS kicks off LTE network with Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 and LG Optimus LTE

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The third of Canada's big three carriers is finally launching their LTE network. Starting tomorrow, TELUS will be offering the Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 and LG Optimus, both with LTE connectivity. Not far behind that is the Samsung Galaxy Note, which is due to drop on February 14 with a $199 pricetag on contract. We had caught a glimpse of the LG Optimus LTE bound for TELUS last week, but now everything is super-duper official.

The TELUS LTE network will cover all of the major centers, and a few of the smaller ones. Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, Calgary, Edmonton and Ottawa are the biggies,  but Kitchener-Waterloo, Guelph, Hamilton, Belleville, Quebec City, Halifax, and even Yellowknife will have coverage as well. By the end of the year, TELUS aims to douse 25 million Canadians with delicious LTE service. Target speeds will be in the average of 12 - 25 Mbps, and capping out at 75 Mbps.  

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2 years ago

Nokia N9 gets a taste of Ice Cream Sandwich in early screenshot

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The Nokia N9 is a great piece of hardware, some users have been pining for Android on the device instead of the built-in MeeGo OS. As it's a relatively developer-friendly phone, it wasn't long before some enterprising hackers got to work porting Android 2.x, and later 4.0, to the N9.

One such developer, Alexey Roslyakov of the NITDroid team, appears to have made significant progress bringing ICS over to the Nokia N9's stylish hardware. He tweeted several images, including the one above, which shows the familiar Android 4.0 launcher being beamed from the N9's AMOLED display. The developer also says he's working on the ability to dual-boot between MeeGo and Android, making it easy to go back to the stock software.

As with any port of Android to unsupported hardware, progress is likely to be steady but slow, and judging by the rendering anomalies in the screenshot, there's still a fair bit of work to be done. Proprietary hardware drivers remain a significant issue, as they are on the CyanogenMod 9 port for the HP TouchPad. Unlike the TouchPad, though, there's been no N9 fire-sale, and the device remains around £400-500 mark this side of the pond.

So for the moment, this is one for the enthusiasts. But we have to admit that if it ever turns into a fully-functional port, we may be just a little big jealous of all you N9 owners.

Source: @drunkdebugger; via: Slashgear

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2 years ago

Google to launch cloud drive service says WSJ

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Google is set to release their own shared cloud storage solution, says the Wall Street Journal.  Their insiders have said that Google will soon launch called "Drive" will rival Dropbox in functionality, being able to "store photos, documents and videos on Google's servers so that they could be accessible from any Web-connected device and allows them to easily share the files with others."  It sounds like it will have some overlap with Picasa, Google Docs, and Youtube, but at this time nobody has all the particulars.  

The new service, expected to launch in the coming weeks or months, will be free for most folks, businesses included.  Google will only charge those who want to "store a large amount of files", so there will be a premium service with more capacity.  If Google does release this one, we would certainly expect it to hit Android devices soon after.  Could this be the big thing at Google I/O this year?

Source: WSJ

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2 years ago

Late-night poll: Do you use lockscreen security?

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Security is important.  We carry a crapload of information in our phones, and with the world of NFC payments slowly becoming a reality, we'll be keeping even more in our pocket and in the cloud.  As we saw earlier today late yesterday, keeping things like PIN codes safe is tough with so many eyes out there trying to find a way around it.  Nobody should have been surprised, nothing is 100 percent secure.  

That's why it's always a good idea to use more than one way to stay safer.  You have secure tokens and password encrypted information on you phone, but keeping people from even getting that far is easy to do with a secure lockscreen.  Android is like Unix, and when someone gets to your homescreen, they're essentially logged in as you.  They can start any application that you can, and start any service.  If you're rooted it's even worse, they can grant super user privileges to anything.

On the other hand, having to unlock your phone every time you get an IM or e-mail gets old fast.  For someone who has never lost a phone, the idea of skipping secure methods seems sensible.  We're not going to argue, your logic is sound (even if others think differently) and it's your device to use the way that makes you happy.  But we're curious.  Answer the poll and let us know!

Thanks, Icebike!

 

Do you use lockscreen security?

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2 years ago

Google-Motorola deal set to be approved by U.S. Justice Department, says WSJ

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Google's aquisition of Motorola Mobility is set to be approved by the U.S. Justice Department as early as next week, according to the Wall Street Journal and people "familiar with the matter." These sort of deals are never a given, as the various governments across the world always have the final say on matters of commerce. This deal would arm Google with very desirable hardware patents for mobile devices, which really is the reason for the entire investigation.

The Justice Department, as well as European Union legislators, are very concerned that Google allows other companies to use these patents under FRAND (fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory) rules, which prohibit things like overcharging for licenses or blocking access to the patents outright.  They should be -- look at all the legal mess smartphone manufacturers are in now, then muddy that picture further by changing license requirements for the things that make a cell phone work. We're not talking lock screens or rounded corners here, Motorola owns IP that all cell phones need and use to operate. Taking away licenses for core technology would benefit nobody, and Google has pledged not to do it. 

Instead, Google has sent letters to to numerous standards organizations, stating that it would offer FRAND licensing for patents in Motorola's portfolio. They didn't promise not to seek damages or injunctions from potential violators, though. Google stated that it "reserves its right to seek any and all appropriate judicial remedies against counterparties that refuse to license its FRAND patents."  Mutual destruction tactics at their finest.

We tend to take things like this from the Wall Street Journal at face value, and this is no exception.  Their track record stands on it's own.  If this is true, and the EU (whose own deadline for a decision is Feb. 13) gives a green light we should know more next week.  We'll keep you posted.

Source (paid content): WSJ

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