Reddit is Fun

The Android phone is for porn, but the Android Market Google Play store is not. Recently, the Reddit is Fun app was pulled from the Play store for inclusion of sexually explicit material, and the developer (rightfully) questioned things publicly. Of course, this started an outcry of epic proportions that in itself would be suitable for Reddit. Following suit, the rumblings of Google being unfair, and that they should pull every browser and other app that allowed access to the Internet began. That's how the Internet works -- it thrives on controversy and only works well when not all the facts are known. 

Turns out the developer talked to the appeals team for the Google Play store, and the Reddit is Fun app did violate some rules that apps like the default browser or a Twitter app did not. The default install of the app included direct recommended links to pornographic material on the main page of Reddit. You see, the filtering agent that decides what is shown on the home screen of the app had all the sub-categories enabled by default. Categories like "ass," "NSFW," "pornvids," "spaceporn," and all other sorts of unsavory material that many folks wouldn't want to see would show up as links. If Grandma picked up your phone, and had no idea the sort of things available on Reddit, all she would know is that it was "Fun" and click them.

Nobody wants Grandma to see MeatSpin. Nobody. (Ed. Note: Phil could have gone the rest of his life without seeing it, too. Seriously, search that NSFW little nugget at your own risk.)

The Reddit is Fun developer is aware how to correct the issue, and we'll likely see the app "back on the shelves" shortly. Of course that part of the story didn't get picked up with the same steam the original pulling of the app did, but that's the Internet for ya.

This time around, we understand why the app was pulled, and can't say we disagree with the act of pulling it. Google could have had a little better communication, but that's another story for another day. There is a big question left, though.

How does Google decide which apps get pulled?

There are several Reddit apps in the Play store, and they all link to the same material. There are apps for 4chan (if you don't know, you don't want to) that link to things far, far worse. Why did these apps not get pulled? We're not sure, but we imagine user reporting has a lot to do with it. We've reached out to Google for a better explanation how this all works, and if we get answers we'll be sure to pass them along. In the meantime, this controversy can be put to rest while we await the next one.

Source: Reddit