Audio-only stream below

Phil, Jerry, Chris and Mickey tackle the new twists in the saga of Android openness. Plus, more on the HTC ThunderBolt, Wifi-only tablets, and more of your e-mails and voicemails. Join us!

Thing 1 - Rubin speaks on the state of Openy

Thing 2 - Wifi-only tablets

Somebody turned up Phil's mic before the podcast. That person is no longer with us. :p

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  • Phil Nickinson
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  • Andrew Martonik
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Reader comments

Android Central Podcast Episode 55

3 Comments

Android is open, Honeycomb is not... yet. Please give the open source debates a rest for a bit, I've had enough.

Why can't Google and/or the Android consortium just implement a certification process like Microsoft has for hardware?
Made for Windows XP/Vista/7, etc? It's not just about the hardware, also about the experience, that would prevent the manufacturers from putting up bloatware or skins, launchers, whatever, that make the experience bad. Have some minimum specs for things like mail, browsing, phone, etc, in terms of stability and performance.
They can still release the code and whoever wants to sell a device that doesn't meet the specs can, but won't be "Android version whatever certified." Consumers (experienced, naive, otherwise) will go to what they feel comfortable with, you want a cheap device that might not work as Android should, you can, you want a more expensive, certified device, that has a really good chance of working great, you also can.