Android 3.x - Honeycomb - Featured Articles

ZTE Optik

ZTE Optik review (Sprint)

The ZTE Optik is a nice little surprise from Sprint. It's an unassuming but well-built and well-running 7-inch Honeycomb tablet that runs on Sprint's 3G network, and it is probably one of the better devices nobody has heard much about. With no gimmicks like a digital stylus or a foldable keyboard...
Team Viewer for Meetings

TeamViewer for Meetings updated with VoIP support

The folks at Teamviewer have pushed out quite the update for their TeamViewer for Meetings app, bringing some minor bug fixes, full hardware acceleration for Honeycomb and Ice Cream Sandwich tablets, and VoIP support. VoIP support on top of the already excellent Teleconferencing application really...
ZTE optik

ZTE Optik getting a minor update, brings some fixes and enhancements

Sprint is pushing out a small update for the 7-inch ZTE Optik today, bringing a few welcome bug fixes to the tablet and some decent software enhancements. According to the official changelog, we should be seeing the following: Google DRM solution Google Music Google+ Persistent...

Android 3.x - Honeycomb - Photos

Android 3.x - Honeycomb RSS Feed

We're here at the Venetian in Las Vegas for Nvidia's presser. Expect a lot of hard-core processor nerd-talk, some Tegra 2 and maybe even some Honeycomb. Join us after the break!

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The Consumer Electronics Show is in full swing now, so get prepared for loads of delicious announcements. Acer took the time to announce a tablet headed to the Verizon LTE network, labeled the ICONIA Tab A500.

The ICONIA Tab will be showcased at CES, so we'll do our best to get you all of the information possible about the device.

Here are the specs we know as of right now:

  • 10.1-inch touchscreen
  • NVIDIA Tegra 2 dual core 1 GHz processor
  • Flash 10.1
  • 1080p playback
  • HDMI-output
  • 13.3 mm thick
  • Ability to play HD arcade games and complex online 3D games (due to a 10-point multi-touch and gyro meter control)

Sounds like a very intriguing device; stay tuned for more juicy details. Full press release after the break.

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The managing director of a Korean consumer electronics firm has told PC Magazine that the next version of Android, nicknamed "Honeycomb," will need a dual-core ARM-9 processor to run "properly."

Let us note a few things here: Honeycomb, which has yet to be announced by Google but was previewed by Andy Rubin last month on a dual-core Motorola tablet, will run on smarpthones as well as tablets. Rubin said as much. And we know that dual-core smartphones are about to hit the mainstream, with LG having already announced the dual-core Optimus 2X.

So will Honeycomb "require" a dual-core processor? Google hasn't said anything, and we wouldn't bet the farm on it. We need to be a bit careful when talking about what is and isn't required to run Android. Why, it was only a month ago when Googlers had to dispel rumors that there was any hard minimum processor requirement for Gingerbread. Had this story come from anyone other than Sascha Segan and PC Mag, we'd toss it out on merit alone. But it is entirely possible that Enspert managing director Bobby Cha misspoke or was referring to recommended minimum requirements -- not a hard line between whether hardware will actually run Gingerbread or not. We all know that hardware well past its prime will run current Android software.

What hardware is required to run Honeycomb well is another matter, however, and we're all going to have to be just a tiny bit patient here, folks. All things in due time. [PCMag]

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In case you missed the teaser last week, Motorola's sending out e-mails touting the upcoming Honeycomb-based tablet it'll show off at CES. Needless to say, we're not getting tired of watching this video just yet, and so you can find it again after the break. Thanks to everyone who sent this in!

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As Gingerbread still bakes in the oven for most of us, rumors keep swirling about Honeycomb, the next iteration of Android, dubbed 3.0.

A story by Digitimes suggests that Honeycomb will be announced in March. Here is the quote (emphasis ours):

On the other hand, MSI is set to display its 10-inch Wintel-based tablet PC as well as engineering samples of its ARM-based Google Android model. MSI is also prepared to sell an Nvidia Tegra 2-based model in April or May after Google releases Android 3.0 in March.

OK, this is Digitimes we're talking here, with its usual unsourced vagueness. It's not the New York Times, or the St. Pete Times. Or the Times of Trenton. So a big ol' grain of salt is required. But we'll more than likely see Honeycomb officially at some point in the earlier part of the year. [Digitimes]

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We've all seen that prototype Motorola tablet running the Honeycomb version of Android that Google's Andy Rubin showed earlier this month -- and now Motorola has teased a Honeycomb tablet at CES next month. The Youtube video walks through the evolution of tablets, from Egyptian hieroglyphics to the Samsung Galaxy Tab. And whatever Moto's got up its sleeve is touted as the next evolution.

We'll be there for the unveiling, of course, so stay tuned., folks, and check out the video after the break.

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As promised, All Things Digital has posted their interview with Android's lead-man, Andy Rubin. In the video from last week's Dive Into Mobile conference, you'll see Rubin tear up the stage with some sweet Honeycomb action -- running it all on the highly anticipated, Tegra 2 Motorola tablet. And even though the Nexus S is officially coming out Thursday at your local Best Buy, here is where it was officially announced for the first time. Oh yeah, Mr. Rubin also shows off the new Google Maps update for Android. [All Things Digital via Engadget]

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By now we've all seen the video and pics from when Andy Rubin hopped onstage showing off the Motorola, Honeycomb equipped tablet and we've gotten a glimpse of the device in a previous blurrycam photoshoot but this time around, it's been caught rocking a Verizon logo and all signs lead to the fact the previous specs noted for the device were indeed accurate. Those specs once again, in case you missed them:

  • 7-inch and 10-inch versions
  • 32GB storage
  • NVIDIA Tegra 2 T20 dual-core processor
  • Gyroscope
  • 1280x800 resolution
  • 5MP camera on the back, 2MP on the front.
  • microSD
  • HDMI out
  • Versions for UMTS, CDMA and LTE

Also noted from the pics is the fact it looks to be making use of micro-USB slot and a 3.5mm headphone socket. And seemingly, some contacts for a charging dock of sorts. Who's excited for this now? More pics can be found after the break. [Engadget]

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After its impromptu appearance with Google's Andy Rubin last week, a few more specs belonging to the Motorola tablet (or tablets) reportedly are coming to light. According to Goldenstone at mobile01, they are:

  • 7-inch and 10-inch versions
  • 32GB storage
  • NVIDIA Tegra 2 T20 dual-core processor
  • Gyroscope
  • 1280x800 resolution
  • 5MP camera on the back, 2MP on the front.
  • microSD
  • HDMI out
  • Versions for UMTS, CDMA and LTE (all bases covered!)

Goldenstone also mentions that it looks like the hardware's pretty set and is lightweight, but that Honeycomb still needs some fine tuning. Needless to say, folks, we can't get our hands on this one soon enough. [Mobile01 via Engadget]

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Link for mobile viewing

Here's video of Google's Andy Rubin showing off that Tegra 2 Motorola tablet prototype running Android 3.0 Honeycomb and the all-new Google Maps. In a word: WANT! [All Things D] Thanks, Kevin!

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We all expected Andy Rubin (the man at Google behind the Android project) to talk Gingerbread at tonight's All Things D's Dive into Mobile conference keynote, but nobody expected to see a prototype Motorola tablet, running Honeycomb.  Not many details were given, but the tablet lacks physical buttons, and was shown running the upcoming Maps application.  When asked about Honeycomb, Rubin stated that a new API was added that allows any application to split its views into multiple panes.  On a tablet, they could be side by side, and on a phone in series one after the other. 

You can bet we're hitting all our sources to find out more, and we'll be sure to let you know as soon as we do.  [All Things D, Engadget]

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Google Andy Rubin whipped out a prototype tablet tonight at the D: Dive Into Mobile conference. That it's a prototype Motorola tablet running Honeycomb is special enough. But it's what he was doing on it that sounds pretty cool. First up was Google Maps. And if there's one thing that frustrates us above all else with Google Maps, it's all that damned tiling, never mind how good our network connection is.

But tiling, apparently, is about to become a thing of the past. A vector version of Google Maps is about to drop "in a matter of days," Rubin said, and will bring better panning and zooming. Plus, 3D graphics and what not -- and offline caching.

Still images from a video don't do it justice, we're sure, so keep an eye out for the video, and for updated maps in a few days. [All Things D; Engadget]

Update: Engadget was given a list of phones that will support the new Google Maps. They are: Samsung Galaxy S, Motorola Droid, Motorola, Droid X, Motorola Droid 2, HTC Droid Incredible, HTC Evo 4G, Nexus S, HTC G2. No Nexus One, apparently, because of multitouch issues. How quickly we fall out of favor, eh?

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After Eric Schmidt showing off the Nexus S yesterday, along with Gingerbread our rumored devices portion of the forums has been busy. In addition to all the Nexus S talk, we got 2 new contests and we seek out some calendar bugs on the Droid Pro. What of the Galaxy Tab getting Honeycomb? Will it happen? Let's discuss it.

If you're not already a member of the Android Central forums, you can register your account today.

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You know how bloggers are -- gotta take us all with a grain of salt (and some of us more than others). But when Mobile-Review's Eldar Murtazin teases that he's seen something, chances are better than average that he's actually laid eyes on the unicorn. And that brings us to a couple of recent tweets. First was the one where he he mentioned playing with the Sony Ericsson Anzo and Samsung Galaxy 2 (or Galaxy s) i9100. An a tweet today says that Motorola's working on a 7-inch "Motopad" that will be the first to sport Honeycomb, which is believed to be Android 3.0.

Tweets -- even from Eldar -- are still usually a ways form us mere mortals having devices in-hand, so we'll see. [Twitter 1, 2]

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Last we heard, LG was halting plans for a tablet until they were able to incorporate a better fit for tablets version of Android OS. A quote from a senior official at LG suggests that the device may be on its way in Q1 2011, Honeycomb and all. 

The tablet, named the LG Pad by the official, will reportedly be shipped with a dual-core Tegra 2 chip and also an 8.9-inch screen. 

We'd be lying if we said we weren't intrigued by the sound of this device, especially that dual-core Tegra 2 chip. The prospect of Honeycomb shipping in Q1 is also interesting, considering the fact that we haven't received an official announcement about Gingerbread, the iteration before Honeycomb. That would be a quick spotlight for Gingerbread to enjoy; not that we'd complain if Honeycomb came earlier than expected. [MK News via Engadget]

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Google has been pretty mum, at least in public, Gingerbread, which at last check was still scheduled to launch sometime this winter. However, DigiTimes has gotten word that Google has recently reached out to its hardware partners to let them know that development on Gingerbread "will soon be completed" and that they can expect engineering prototypes sometime in December. Expect an updated Galaxy Tab from Samsung, as well as tablet offerings from Motorola, HTC, and traditional notebook manufacturers like Acer once CES rolls around in January of next year. 

In addition, the site said we can expect Android 4.0 (Honeycomb?) during the middle of 2011, but did not offer any details on the OS. They went on to explain some of the benefits of using Android as a tablet OS over Windows: namely, that licensing for Android is just $10 compared to up to $60 for Windows. In addition, the ARM processors used by Android are much cheaper than the Intel ones required by Windows. So, in short, expect to see tons of Android tablets come January. But that's hardly a surprise, right? [DigiTimes]

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Ice Cream will be the version of Android following Honeycomb, Forbes reported today. We haven't even gotten to Gingerbread yet, but that doesn't mean we can't look to the future. 

Google has taken to naming different iterations of Android after desserts, in alphabetical order. Beginning at "C," we've had Cupcake, Donut, Eclair and Froyo. Gingerbread and Honeycomb have been confirmed to be next and are expected to be announced later this year and early next year, respectively. Google has not said anything about what delicious desserts will follow Honeycomb, but that doesn't prevent hardware partners from doing so. 

Tudor Brown, the President of ARM, mentioned the codename to Elizabeth Woyke of Forbes. ARM, which manufacturers processors, integrates with a wide variety of electronic devices, many of which run Android; in other words, he would be in the know about future Android versions. 

All that said, we haven't really had an official official announcement from Google about anything past Froyo, so we'll just have to see. [Forbes] Thanks to everyone who sent this in.

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TechRadar has done some digging, and actually have "multiple sources" that confirm that the version of Android following Android 3.0 ("Gingerbread") will be named "Honeycomb." Following Google's naming conventions for the OS, one could reasonably assume that a snack starting with "H" was up for the next next update. The previous named versions are: 1.5 ("Cupcake"), 1.6 ("Donut"), 2.0/1 ("Eclair"), and 2.2 ("Froyo"). There weren't many choices available, but I personally was rooting for "Haagen-Daz." [TechRadar via Gizmodo]

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