Gizmodo is speculating that Google will eventually bring their new desktop OS, Chrome OS, to their current OS, Android's, space--smartphones. We can't argue with them either, Android and Chrome OS seem to be on a collision course that we'll definitely be hearing about more in the future.

Gizmodo bases their theory off the quotes from Google VP of Engineering Vic Gundotra's quotes at Mobilebeat 2009. He stated that web development will be the future for successful mobile platforms, and what do you know, the web is Chrome OS's moneymaker.

With Google's belief that the web/browser holds the key to mobile success, whatever OS that offers the best web/browser experience would likely be considered the leader of the pack. Whether that is Android or Chrome OS is too early to tell but it seems Google will be happy either way--more people on the web simply means more Google users which simply means more money in big Google's pockets.

We're hopeful that Chrome OS will stay away from smartphones but its good influence and innovation will find its way to Android. Yeah, we want to have our cake and eat it too. What do you guys think?

 

Reader comments

Will Google Bring Chrome OS to Smartphones ?

8 Comments

Edmund Burk once said: “Those who don't know history are destined to repeat it.”

I fear that if Google abandons Android in favor of Chrome it will spell disaster for the platform. Palm is the "history" in this case. They had a killer OS in the beginning. And for various arguable reasons they went with Windows Mobile. Now they're clawing their way out of a hole with WebOS. While WebOS is good, look at the position their past history put them in.

If Google straight up drops Android for Chrome, what will that do to the confidence the public has in the platform? The iPhone-centric blogosphere will undoubtedly rip them to shreds for not being ready to enter the arena. And they would face the same scenario Palm is currently battling.

I agree with Casey that the good things about Chrome should be incorporated into Android. If they do choose to do a Chrome-mobile, for marketing's sake, I would at the very least keep the Android moniker (and the bakery inspired updates too; brilliant marketing strategy - even if it was kinda by accident). Brand recognition means a lot in an industry where the phone turnover rate is 6 months.

The Chrome versus Android situation concerns me. I would suggest that Google, HTC and T-Mobile provide some assurance to all the prospective myTouch buyers that their OS won't be orphaned sometime down the road. I have been debating whether or not to get the myTouch now or wait for the Hero (or whatever) down the road. This situation moves me closer to the wait position.

I think this whole Chrome OS versus Android is overblown. Android already has a browser, yet app developers deem it more profitable to build their apps using the Android SDK/NDK. The screens on smartphones are way too small to properly support Google's vision of a web-based world. Custom thin client apps that attach to web services (and ads of course), are the way to go there and Android, and the much less open iPhone, fill that need.

Note also that the Gismondo guys are assuming that when Vic said "mobile", he meant smartphone. There are a lot of new mobile platforms coming that are a much better fit for the browser. They start with the 10" netbooks we have today and grow smaller and with better battery life. But, trust me, they don't get down to the 4" format.

What I do see coming is the OS part of Chrome OS and of Android merging. There's no need for Google to support and promote two OSes into the community. Take Android, take out Dalvik (or leave it there for some other purpose), and make Chrome the home UI. Done.

Why are the pundits obsessed with this? Android is for Mobile Phones. Chrome is for netbooks, laptops, and desktops.

Why is it so inconceivable that Google can develop two different OS that logically have very similar architecture?

You can't cram an OS meant for a laptop onto a mobile phone, and you shouldn't put a mobile phone OS, which is touch screen-centric, onto a laptop.

These two operating systems will serve different needs.

What's next, pundits worrying that Apple going to put the iPhone OS on its desktops and laptops?

I think that Opera is a better browser than Chrome, however we are talking about OSs, Google should separate the things.