Security - Featured Articles

HTC One Accounts

So, you want to adopt BYOD?

What you need to know before integrating employee devices on your network Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) is the current hot trend. (And has been for a while, really.) There are many perceived advantages for a company that allows employees to bring their own devices to work and have access to your...
LG G Pro 2 Knock Code

How to use Knock Code on the LG G Pro 2

Knock Code will come to other LG phones via software updates this year With Knock On — wherein you tap the display twice to turn on your phone — has been one of our favorite new features of the past few months. LG introduced it with the LG G2 in 2013, and it returned with the LG G Flex toward...
The Boeing Black

Boeing reveals the Boeing Black — a super-secure smartphone for those with super security needs

This phone will self destruct in ten seconds… In this day and age of malicious apps and intrusive government surveillance, you might be wondering how to keep your data secure. You could turn to a solution like the up-and-coming Geeksphone Blackphone, with a modified version of Android and sets...

Security - Top Articles

SD card: Activate

KitKat and SD cards — what's fixed, what's broken and what's misunderstood

Why your SD card doesn't work the same in Android 4.4 KitKat, and the reasons for the change “Curse you, Google! Your KitKat update broke my SD card!” Poke around the Android section of the Internet and you’ll hear something similar. Users like you and me are in an uproar because they updated...
Google fixes Heartbleed

Google updates back-end in light of Heartbleed vulnerability

If you've been online at some point in the last 36 hours, chances are you've heard of 'Heartbleed', a flaw in OpenSSL that has exposed data to theft on approximately 2/3 of servers in use around the globe over the past two years. It's not known how bad the damage may be, but the revelation of the...
Android Central

NBC News and the bullshit 'ZOMG Sochi Olympics Android hack' story

Your Android smartphone only installs malware if you're being dumb (or do it on purpose) — not automatically, and not just because you're in Russia. This is just ridiculous, even for American "news" television. A report from NBC News was exposed — and rightfully so — by Errata Security (via...
The Boeing Black

Boeing reveals the Boeing Black — a super-secure smartphone for those with super security needs

This phone will self destruct in ten seconds… In this day and age of malicious apps and intrusive government surveillance, you might be wondering how to keep your data secure. You could turn to a solution like the up-and-coming Geeksphone Blackphone, with a modified version of Android and sets...
SkipLock.

Unlock With Wifi app retooled and is now SkipLock

Safety meets convenience with a set of great features  You may have heard us talk about an app called Unlock With Wifi a time or two. It's an app that tells your lock screen when to become secured with a password or PIN, based on what Wifi AP you're connected to. It's one of those apps that you...
Gmail

All Gmail will now use HTTPS, messages will be encrypted when moving inside Google

Initiatives were 'made a top priority after last summer's revelations' Google has steadily improved the overall security of several of its apps and services, and the latest move is moving to HTTPS and encryption across all of Gmail. Starting today, every single time you send or check your Gmail...
HTC One Accounts

So, you want to adopt BYOD?

What you need to know before integrating employee devices on your network Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) is the current hot trend. (And has been for a while, really.) There are many perceived advantages for a company that allows employees to bring their own devices to work and have access to your...
Cerebus

Cerberus servers have a data leak, users advised to change password

Users of the popular phone security app Cerberus are reporting a slightly disturbing email coming from the developers today. While Cerberus assures that no passwords were compromised — they are encrypted, of course — attackers did gain access to some usernames and passwords. If you're using...
LG G Pro 2 Knock Code

How to use Knock Code on the LG G Pro 2

Knock Code will come to other LG phones via software updates this year With Knock On — wherein you tap the display twice to turn on your phone — has been one of our favorite new features of the past few months. LG introduced it with the LG G2 in 2013, and it returned with the LG G Flex toward...
Android Central

Android Device Manager app launches on Google Play

Like the web interface, the new app lets you remotely track and lock down your other Android devices Google has launched a new Android app allowing users of the Android Device Manager feature to remotely track, ring, lock down or wipe their other devices. Not to be confused with the Google Play...

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Lookout has announced the creation of the "Mobile Threat Network" -- designed to automate the process of detection and analysis of applications that pose a threat to the end user's security.  Using a mobile security API, protection can be extended not only to the end user, but to the application market as well.  Verizon Wireless has gotten on board, and their VCast app store will use the mobile security API to connect with the Mobile Threat Network, the first such company to become involved.  We've seen how hard it can be to keep determined people from pushing malware laden applications to market, so we're glad to see any effort to fight against it.

The way it works, applications are scanned and analyzed, with suspicious apps identified.  After determining that an application is malicious, Lookout will protect your phone, and the new Mobile Threat Network keeps it from showing up at any market that participates -- like the VCast app store.  A fast and efficient way to scan applications and mark potential problem apps for a further investigation sounds like a great solution to a real problem.

It's a sad fact of life that an open market model will have malware.  We hate it as much as you do, but it's important that we recognize that it exists.  The vast majority of the applications available for the Android platform are perfectly safe to use, written by hard working developers, but one bad Apple can ruin the bunch.  Maybe you have the time and know-how to keep yourself safe from malware, but if you want the convenience and security of an automated system from the professionals, it's great that one exists.  For more details, read the press release after the break and hit the source link to read more.

Source: Lookout

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If you've noticed a software update hitting your Logitech Revue over the past day or so, it's nothing more major than a little security update, Logitech says. Nothing more, nothing less.

We're still on the lookout for Android 3.1 to hit Google TV devices, bringing a whole lot of Android awesomesauce that should put a good bit more functionality into these little set top box wonders that so far have largely underwhelmed.

Source: Logitech

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Adobe pushed out a new update to its Android Flash Player today. In addition to a host of bugfixes, the new version also features several important security updates.  Nothing major is listed, but security updates and bug fixes are always a good thing.  If you have flash installed on your android, be sure to grab this ASAP.

Source: Adobe Thanks, zacharyzblewski!

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Lookout has announced a new feature to their premium service, called Safe Browsing.  What it does is spread protection from malware beyond installed applications, and into your browser.  If you've ever used the Chrome browser, and spent any time on the Internet, you've surely seen sites blocked because of malware or phishing -- that's what the new Safe Browsing feature does.  I spent some time talking with Lookout's Marketing Director Alicia diVittorio, and Senior Software Engineer Anbu Anbalagapandian and got a little explanation of what to expect, and then spent a little time going through the paces and testing it out. 

First the technical details.  Safe Browsing sits idle in the background, listening for the "intent" (think of that as a command) to open a web URL through the browser.  It checks that URL, and if it comes back clean, it goes back to sleep.  If not, you get a message pop-up with a warning.  This means it works with website addresses from any source, including Twitter and Facebook.  Since the necessary evil of URL shorteners is now pretty commonplace, this is a pretty nice way to be sure you're going where you think your going.  In the usage department, it's simple.  Open Lookout, go into the settings, and turn it on.  If you stumble across a website that's acting a little suspicious, it tells you.  If not, it sits quietly out of the way.  Anbu told me they tested the battery life and performance impact, and found no issues at all.  While one day is hardly a perfect use case, I didn't notice any more wear and tear on the battery than normal, and saw no change in the way my phone performed, so my short test agrees. 

In addition to the new Safe Browsing feature, Lookout also announced that they are partnering with Sprint, making Lookout available directly from the Sprint Zone, and the Sprint tab in your phone's Android Market page.  This should make it much easier to find for those new to Android, and especially those new to smartphones and the most susceptible to the dirty tricks out there in the wilds of the web.

Safe Browsing is a premium feature.  We've went over the other premium features pretty well when they were released.  You need to look at what's offered, then decide if you need to go premium.  If you do need the pay services, it will cost you $2.99 per month, or $29.99 a year.  To celebrate the launch of Safe Browsing, Lookout is offering $5.00 off the price of the subscription for the next seven days.  Just use the code BESAFEAC when you purchase your subscription via the app and you'll save enough money for lunch.  You'll also wanna jump past the break and read the press release, watch a short video of Safe Browsing in action, and find the download link. 

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Adobe has release the 10.3.185.23 update to Flash in the Android Market this afternoon.  This update directly addresses two known security issues discovered recently (see security bulletins APSB11-12 and APSB11-13 for details), and brings the following bug fixes and enhancements:

  • Enabled NEON optimizations for OMAP4 (Cortex A-9) based devices.
  • Corrected an issue on the Samsung Galaxy S where H.264 video at resolutions of 720p and below was not displayed.
  • Fixed an issue where app packaging would fail for Android Apps using Flash Player in WebView that set android:hardwareAcceleration to True in their AndroidMainfest.xml.
  • Fixed a crash on the HTC EVO that some users encountered with specific video.
  • Fixed an issue that caused video frames to stop rendering on long streaming videos (> 1 hour) on some Motorola devices. 
  • Fixed an issue where touch events were getting delayed with Kongregate.com games.
  • Fixed an issue where games on Kongregate.com freeze when users exit from Full-Screen mode.

You can grab the update from the Android Market (we'll have the link after the break) and as always, it's advised that all users update. 

Source: Adobe

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Google is rolling out a patch on their servers to fix the Google calendar and contacts sidejacking issue we talked about in a recent Sunday editorial.  This will require no user action, and even your carrier won't be able to stop it so they can put Bing on it first.

To review: there is a bug (that was fixed in Gingerbread) that lets an attacker have potential access to your Google calendar, contacts, and Picasa account if you log in on an unsecure Wifi network.  Because there are about a gazillion phones affected, and many of them will never see Gingerbread, the server-side fix is welcomed.

We don't know the exact details of the fix, but a statement by Google says:

Today we’re starting to roll out a fix which addresses a potential security flaw that could, under certain circumstances, allow a third party access to data available in calendar and contacts. This fix requires no action from users and will roll out globally over the next few days.

We still say the bug should have never made it out to users in the first place, but a speedy resolution is always good.  Just don't forget about Picasa while you're playing in the server code, Google.

Source: AllThingsD

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Malicious files once again have found their way into the Android Market, with a set of applications being hijacked, reverse engineered with malicious code injected, and published alongside the legitimate applications.

Two thing need mention up front -- Google has already removed the apps from the Market, and this time around they only affected users in China, where they also originate from.  If you're reading this story, you probably are safe and never were at risk.  But this is still a big concern.  A set of bad guys (that's my safe-for-work version) were able to de-compile apps from a legit developer, put in some code that sends SMS messages to a Chinese subscription service, and then took some really ingenious steps to keep everything hidden from the user.  That's going to happen, because everything that's electronic and popular enough is a target.  The part that is concerning is that these are making their way into the Android Market.

Allow me to have a few hundred words with you about it, after the break.

Source: AegisLabs via Sophos; Thanks, Tony Bag o' Donuts!

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

Have a rooted and hacked Nook Color? Want to run the new Netflix app? It's as simple as changing the build.prop file, of course, to make the app think your $250 e-reader actually is one of the few phones currently supported by Netflix. Been there, hacked that, got the T-shirt.

Youtuber huskermania has worked up an excellent video showing you how it's done. In less than five minutes, you, too, can be streaming Netflix on the Nook Color to your heart's content. Check it out.

More coverage: Nook Color forums. Thanks, Alex!

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Much hay has been made of late over your phone caching (aka "storing") your location data. It started with the realization that the iPhone was storing location data ... and storing, and storing. (And also syncing the data to the computer via iTunes.) The problem is that the data wasn't overwritten over time, so you've got a general look at where someone's been over the life of the phone.

Headlines ensued.

Android does the same sort of thing, boys and girls. And it's supposed to. But it does it right. Instead of saving days and weeks and months of location data, it saves the 50 most recent cellular GPS locations, and 200 most recent Wifi fixes. And it's stored in a little file on your phone.

"But, Phil!" you cry. "That's a big security concern!" Well, yes. And, no.

First off: All those location-based services you like to use -- Google Maps, local search results, Foursquare, Gowalla, Twitter, photo geotagging, etc. -- they all use caching to speed up the process of figuring out where you are. That's what caching is, after all. Saving data (in a "cache") so that it doesn't have to be loaded from scratch each time. The browser you're reading this on likely does it, and it makes things that much easier. Same thing for smartphones.

"But, Phil!" you cry. "All of that information is cached on my phone, where anyone can get to it!" Well, sure. But, first and foremost, you need root access ("you" being an app or someone trying to get at the data). There's a handy little app called Location Cache on the Android Market that will show you just where you've been. Or, more accurately, where your phone has pinged. (I haven't actually been in Washington, D.C., in about 8 years, but my phone's pinged some Wifi access point there, somehow.) The app also gives you the option to wipe the cached location data and block further data.

But in long list of things that are on my phone that I don't want to fall into evil hands, my 50 most recent cellular pings aren't all that high. Nor are the 200 most recent Wifi locations I've pinged one way or another. Contacts and e-mail, photos, well, that's another story.

But our level of concern really comes down to this: How would someone gain access to the information? The most likely route is directly. Your phone is lost or stolen and falls into nefarious hands. Sure, it's possible you could download an evil-doing application. You might have heard about a few in the news lately. But in spite the occasional headline, data-stealing apps aren't all that prevalent. We know. We download a lot of apps around here. And your phone needs to be rooted for anyone -- or any app -- to have access to the location cache in the first place.

So what can you do? What should you do?

First thing we'd recommend is installing a security app that can locate your phone should it be lost or stolen -- and wipe it (erase all the data) if you can't recover it. There are a bunch of good security apps out there. Google 'em and take a look. It's worth taking a look at, location caching or no location caching.

Alternatively, you can shut off Android's location services and stop further caching of location data. It's in Settings>Location & Security. (The name might be slightly different depending on your phone, but we're not surprised Google associated one with the other on stock Android.)

And you might not have noticed this unless you're the type who flashes devices from scratch on a daily or weekly basis, but one of the first things Android does is ask whether you want to use the location services. It is not caching your location information without your permission, even if you never noticed it on setup.

Let's recap: The sky's not falling. Android isn't storing your location information -- and remember this is general location information and not necessarily exactly where you've been -- without your permission. And it's pretty unlikely that your cached data will fall into evil hands. And even if it does, there are ways to protect yourself.

Tonight, we'll sleep just fine.

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Fear not, people of Earth. Your weeklong national Skype nightmare is over. The essential communications app has plugged that security hole we didn't actually sweat too much over -- the one where some of your data, and your contacts data, was stored insecurely. And to show there are no hard feelings, tucked into this morning's update is "Calling over your 3G connection is available worldwide - now including the US."  This opens up 3G calling to everyone, not just Verizon customers like we've seen so far.

Now doesn't that make you feel better? Snag the update in the Android Market, and we've got download links after the break.

Update: And Skype's chimed in, saying on its security blog:

We have had no reported examples of any 3rd party malicious application misusing information from the Skype directory on Android devices and will continue to monitor closely. Please rest assured that we do take your privacy and security very seriously and we sincerely apologise for any concern this issue may have caused.

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Skype Profile info left vulnerable to malicious applications

Skype on Friday issued a public response to a security issue uncovered recently that leaves some profile and message information open and vulnerable to malicious applications. Uncovered by Android Police, the vulnerability deals with the way the Skype Android application stores some personal information, making your profile information -- and your Skype contacts' profile information (among other bits of Skype data) -- easily found and scraped by any application that wants to. Skype, on its blog, has said:

It has been brought to our attention that, were you to install a malicious third-party application onto your Android device, then it could access the locally stored Skype for Android files.

These files include cached profile information and instant messages. We take your privacy very seriously and are working quickly to protect you from this vulnerability, including securing the file permissions on the Skype for Android application.

To protect your personal information, we advise users to take care in selecting which applications to download and install onto their device.

That's a fairly serious hole, and it's good that it was discovered, reported and is being fixed. So have you been in any danger all this time? Possibly, but you would have had to have installed a malicious application that knew to run this exploit in the first place. Chances of that are fairly low, but not out of the question. And it's important to remember that we're talking about Skype data, not the full contacts list on your phone. That doesn't mean it's not a gaping hole that needs to be closed; but neither are we worried about the sky falling. Be careful what you download, folks. [Skype, Android Police]

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YouTube link for mobile viewing

Security researcher Ian Robertson has built an Android application that can be used to bypass security on the popular Cardkey door control systems.  Using his Droid Incredible, he is able to brute-force past any PIN, and issue commands across the Internet to the IP-based systems that will unlock all doors, grant 30 seconds to open them, then relock the doors -- all with a push of a button.  Who says you need to be a registered guest to use that Holiday Inn jacuzzi?

This demonstrates not only the really poor security on these systems, but a level of 1337 that we haven't seen on Android as of yet.  Hat's off to you Ian, and hopefully you can persuade a few people that they need to ramp security up a notch.  [CyberSecurityGuy]

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By now most everyone knows that Google has addressed the Droid Dream malware mess in the Android Market, used the kill switch and issued a fix, and is in process of rolling out said fix to all affected users.  But since Android users in general are an impatient lot, some folks have been on the lookout for the files to manually install the fix instead of waiting.

Don't do it.

The folks at F-Secure have found that at least one of the so-called security patch files floating around is really just another trojan.  This is social engineering at it's finest -- use the promise of security to really make things worse.  You can read the gory details of the BgServ.A trojan found in the fake patch at the source link, but the important thing is that you need to wait for Google to push you the fix if you downloaded one of the infected files.  Like every other patch for the OS, whether it's an updated version of Android or something less glamorous like a security fix, only install files from Google's servers.

If you were affected by the malware, you should have received an email from big G, or will soon.  We have the full text of that message after the break, be sure to check that the sender is really Google, and sit tight.  They will get you all patched up. [F-Secure] Thanks Mike and Steven!

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Developer banned, malicious apps automatically removed from users' infected phones, exploits patched

Google late Saturday night publicly revealed the action it has taken in the wake of a number of malicious applications that were lurking not so quietly in the Android Market. As you'll recall, some 21 apps from a single developer were found to be collecting and sending device IDs (IMEI codes) and Android versions, but the exploit left users open to worse attacks. Here's the short version of what Google's done since being alerted March 1:

  • The apps were removed from the Market, developer accounts banned and law enforcement notified.
  • Google is remotely removing the malicious applications from infected phones. (That's a feature Google has its disposal, and has used in the past.)
  • Google is pushing an update to undo the security exploits that allowed these malicious apps to work in the first place.
  • Google is "adding a number of measures to help prevent additional malicious applications using similar exploits from being distributed through Android Market."

A couple things to note here: If you are running Android 2.2.2 or higher, you don't have these security vulnerabilities. If you were affected, you'll be getting an e-mail from Google (android-market-support@google.com) explaining things, and you'll be getting an Android Market Security Tool 2011 app to patch the exploits.

So the barn door's been closed, folks. Google says it's taking additional steps to keep this sort of thing from happening again. That's not to say it won't happen -- by nature, attacks will continue. But good on Google for explaining exactly what happened, and what's being done in the aftermath. [Google Mobile Blog]

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Symantec has uncovered yet another trojan horse in a pirated Android app. This time around it's the "Android.Pjapps" trojan, and you can find it in modified versions of the Steamy Window app that have been cracked and placed on Android warez sites.  The official version of Steamy Window that's on the Android Market is not infected.  And it's a fun little time waster that you should probably have a look at

What's happening from the trojan in the pirated app is a bit scary.  Without your knowledge, it signs you up for premium text message services, sends off texts to them without your knowledge, and blocks incoming texts from the service so that you have no idea what is going on -- until your monthly bill from your service provider arrives.  It's sneaky, and someone needs a good old-fashioned ass kicking for doing it.  As we saw with other instances of malware hidden inside legitimate applications, this one originates in China, and is written by people probably a lot smarter than most of us.  You're not going to be able to outwit them.  Be smart -- only download apps from trustworthy sources, and read the permissions an app asks for when installing it.  Or you can go a step further and install an anti-virus application.

Now that the news portion is done, I want to say that anyone stealing Android applications will eventually get what they deserve.  These unofficial, unsanctioned, pirate websites hawking paid apps for free don't care about you.  They just want the traffic to view their ads, or your "$10 per year for all apps for FREE ZOMG."  If you visit them, and get a little more than you bargained for in the application you have stolen, make sure you only blame yourself.  There are legitimate sources to download applications if you're unable to access the Android Market, and they help developers get paid what they are owed.  Use them.

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The folks over at Lookout have released information about another Android trojan application -- named HongTouTou.  As we saw with the Geinimi trojan, this one has only been spotted in re-packaged (yes, we mean cracked) apps on a few Chinese language websites.  Specifically mentioned was the popular game RoboDefense, which has been cracked and pirated all over the web.  The Market version, both free and paid, of RoboDefense is unaffected -- only apk files that have been tampered with are affected.

What this one does is send data containing your device ID to a remote host, which returns a string of search engine URL data.  Then it emulates background keyword searches, generating clicks on specific results.  It's clearly designed to use your phone to increase click-through counts and generate a bit of income for the people who wrote it.  The HongTouTou trojan also has the ability to download an .apk that monitors your SMS messages and inserts keywords into the conversation.  Researchers at Lookout say they have not seen the trojan attempt to install the apk, but they have been able to disassemble it.

Lookout also says that users of their Android security suite (free or premium) have received an OTA update that protects them from HongTouTou. 

Here's the breakdown -- just like on your computer, if you go looking to pirate apps you just might end up with more than you bargained for.  That's your call, but if and when this happens, you can only blame yourself.  As of today, there has not been a case of true malware found in an app downloaded from the Android Market, and we haven't heard of any from other reputable third party marketplaces.  If you want to be safe, download and install a security app, and stay away from pirated applications. [Lookout Blog]

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You can never care about your personal information security too much, and Google's rolling out a cool new feature to keep your stuff safe. It'll work in conjunction with your phone. You'll still have your usual password. But as an added layer of security, you can opt to have a second checkpoint that will send you a verification code, either through the Google Authenticator app (for Android, BlackBerry or iPhone), or by SMS or even a phone call. You can have it remember the verification for 30 days if you wish.

The service will be rolling out over the next few days, and be sure to read Google's entire post on it for all the details. Yeah, it's an extra step, but it's an extra layer of security. And we like that around here. [Google]

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More than a few of us (and us) noticed that when you got the latest update to Angry Birds, the app stated that it needed permissions to your SMS messages. At the time, Rovio told us it likely was a mistake, and that they'd look at it on Monday. However, it turns out it has a purpose and is part of an in-app payment system, called Big Bad Piggy Bank, which can be used to purchase the Mighty Eagle and other content. From Rovio's blog:

Bad Piggy Bank purchases will be paid through operator billing. No credit card is required, you simply select the content you want to purchase in the game, and select the Bad Piggy Bank icon. You confirm your purchase, the payment is made via SMS, and you will be charged in your phone bill.

The Android version of Angry Birds asks for SMS permission because this mobile payment capability has been added in version 1.5.1.

Angry Birds does not use the SMS functionality of the device for any other purpose than Bad Piggy Bank payments.

If the Bad Piggy Bank is not available for your operator, no purchases can be made, and you cannot be charged for anything.

All that said, it's only available in Finland at the moment. And note that this is separate from the in-app billing that Google just announced with Honeycomb.

So the good news is that there's nothing malicious (not that we ever thought there was) in the update. The bad news is it gives the app a permission that so far a very large number of users can't actually use. [Rovio] Thanks, Justin!

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NetQin, China's market leader in mobile security, has brought their anti-virus application to Android.  NetQin anti-virus offers real-time monitoring, instant scanning, contacts backup and restoration, and phone theft and loss protection. NetQin anti-virus uses what they call Cloud Scan:

"cloud and client twin-engine scanning, which is faster and more accurate at identifying and resolving threats from viruses and malicious programs. Key benefits include fast response to the latest security threats and comprehensive protection from Trojans, malware, and virus-infected plug-ins."

As new threats are found, the cloud scan engine is updated to deal with them.  In real-world usage, the app seems to use little resources, and there is no noticeable slowdown with it running in the background. 

Maybe you'll never have need for an Android malware scanner, but threats do exists in the wild.  It's a by-product of being "open" to the installation of unapproved software.  Applications like NetQin anti-virus fill that need, and it looks like this one will do very nicely.  If you want to give it a try, it's free in the Market, and is available in a version for Android 1.5 and Android 1.6, as well as a version for Android 2.x.  The full press release is after the jump.

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If you're looking for a cost effective monitoring solution then allow us to introduce you to Dropcam if you've not heard of them before.  Dropcam is a easy to use, easy to set up service that allows for remote monitoring via your device or web browser when using a Dropcam monitoring system.  With the Dropcam Android App you can:

  • Stream Live Video: Your Dropcam cloud-based cameras stream secure, uninterrupted live video that let you see every single minute of action. With the app, you can watch your video streams or friends’ Dropcam camera streams. Get live, smooth video playback on Wi-Fi, 3G and 4G.
  • Receive Instant Activity Alerts: The Dropcam system is so intelligent it uses motion and audio detection to identify and capture activity ‘Events’. These activities are displayed as a snapshot on your video timeline so you can check in immediately to see what’s happening. Using the Android app, quickly set up automatic email alerts to get instant notices for motion and noise event detection.
  • Access Dropcam DVR: The Dropcam DVR captures every second of what your camera sees and stores that video online for up to 30 days. DVR controls let you playback previously recorded events from your personal video stream. You can also download video clips to archive footage permanently.

Previously only available on other platforms, Dropcam has now moved into the Android Market as a free download. If you're a Dropcam system owner already this app compliments the services nicely. If you do not as of yet own a Dropcam system then you may wish to check them out of you're looking for any sort of remote video monitoring solution. Hit the source link for the full product details and a video of the app as well as the download can be found after the break. [Dropcam]

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