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1 hour ago

Deal: Get the Moto X4 for just $299 with Amazon Prime

1

An already great deal is now even better.

There's no shortage of solid mid-range offerings in the Android space right now, and with devices like the Moto E4 and G5S Plus, Motorola is leading the charge for phones between $200 and $400. Amazon recently cut the price of its Prime Exclusive Version of the Moto X4, and this now makes the phone something of a no-brainer for Prime subscribers.

The Prime Exclusive Moto X4 typically sells for $329 on Amazon, but if you buy the phone right now, you can pick it up for just $299. A savings of $30 might not be huge, but considering that the regular X4 sells for $399, that's a fantastic price.

You will have to put up with pre-installed Amazon apps and advertisements on the lock screen since this is the Prime Exclusive variant, but for $299, it's hard to complain about this. For that price, you're getting a 5.2-inch 1080p Full HD display, Snapdragon 630 processor, 3GB of RAM, 32GB of expandable storage, dual cameras, IP67 dust and water resistance, and a metal+glass construction.

There's no word as to how long you'll be able to pick up the Moto X4 for $299, but should you buy it, you'll be able to use it on AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint, and Verizon (as well as any of their respective MVNOs, such as Cricket Wireless, Boost Mobile, MetroPCS, etc).

See at Amazon

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3 hours ago

Android 8.0 Oreo now rolling out to OnePlus 3/3T with OxygenOS 5.0 update

4

The update will first be rolled out incrementally and then expand to more users.

OnePlus recently announced the 5T as its latest flagship handset, and while the phone does have a lot to offer, one area of annoyance lies with the fact that it won't receive an official build of Android Oreo until some point in 2018. However, if you own a OnePlus 3 or 3T, an over-the-air update for Oreo is rolling out now. An open beta for Oreo on the 3/3T began in October, but this update is being made available for all users as an official build.

With this being an update to Oreo, you'll soon have access to the likes of notification dots, picture-in-picture, Google's Autofill API, and smart text selection. However, in typical OnePlus fashion, you'll also find a variety of custom tweaks to elevate your Oreo experience even more.

OnePlus has added a new folder design within its launcher, there's now an option to upload photos you've taken directly to Shot on OnePlus, and the recently announced Parallel Apps feature that allows you to have two separate instances of the same application is here as well. Lastly, the update comes with the September security patch (and strangely not the more recent November one).

The Oreo/OxygenOS 5.0 update will be rolling out incrementally at first starting today and then expand to more and more users over the coming days.

Android Oreo

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22 hours ago

Why the LG V10 is still in my gear bag two years later

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Great audio chops and being built to withstand the apocalypse makes the V10 the one phone I'm holding on to.

I've never used a phone more than a year. Before I came to work for Mobile Nations I got a new BlackBerry every year (except for a miserable affair with a Palm Pre) and nowadays I seem to change phones at least two or three times a year. But the LG V10 is still charged and in my carrying-around bag.

Changing phones stops being fun after the first 20 or so times.

And I still use it quite a bit. I love the way it's built with the rubber textured back and solid steel frame but that's not why I keep it around. Neither is the woefully old software the reason. I just love the way it sounds.

I carry three phones counting the V10, and even I think that's a bit ridiculous. But like everyone ever in the history of consumer electronics, I can't find the one thing that's perfect for everything. The Pixel 2 is what I use for any work stuff. We need to know what happens with Android from Google and how things work before another company gets in there and changes, fixes, or breaks things. It's also a really damn good phone and would be my choice if I had to pick just one.

I also carry my BlackBerry KEYone in case I actually have to do anything more than type out a short and typo-filled message. Any BlackBerry fan will tell you that the right keyboard can be a lifesaver if you need to do a lot of work with your phone, and now that a great BlackBerry keyboard phone is part of the Android ecosystem it's pretty damn wonderful.

But neither of these phones nor any other new phone I have here plays my music the way the V10 plays my music. The HTC 10 did, but because it's not built like a weapon of mass destruction it didn't survive as long as the V10 has. And the V10 sounds even better now than it did when I first got it. Like many music players or stereo parts, it got even better with a little age after the parts burned in a bit. I'm not exactly sure why that works the way it does, so I chalk it up to dust being magical. But it works like that. But I do know that the V10 is the best music player and fun device I've ever had and neither of its successors nor any other phone since comes close.

The V10 is the best music player I've ever had. And my wife would be quick to mention that I've had too many of them.

Besides playing the tunes the way I like them to be played, the V10 has a great camera, records sound better than any other phone I've tried, and is as connected as every other Android device. I often think that some company (looking at you, Samsung) needs to make a good music player that has Google Play support but doesn't need to be imported from Japan for $1,000. But really, that's exactly what my V10 is. Google Maps, Twitter, Facebook, and all the rest of the apps we love are there along with every streaming service and premium audio support. It's better than a good PMP because it can double as a phone if I wanted it to.

I know it's not going to last forever. If I get lucky and never meet Mr. Bootloop I reckon I can get a couple more years out of it. I just hope someone makes a replacement that I like as well between now and then.

I can't be the only one hanging on to some old phone because it makes a great second-duty device. At least I hope I'm not. Holler at me if you're doing something similar and keeping an old phone around because it's so damn good at a few things.

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1 day ago

Best Phones for Rooting and Modding

Best overall

OnePlus 5T

See at OnePlus

OnePlus phones have been fan favorites among Android enthusiasts since the company was started because they're cheap and run well. The 5T is no exception.

OnePlus makes it easy to unlock the bootloader and install alternative software, and the relatively low price will make for a large development community. A strange positive is that issues with the factory software mean that more people are interested in modding the OnePlus 5T, which makes a large community even larger.

If you are looking to spend some money on a phone just so you can hack away at it, the OnePlus 5T is worth looking at.

Bottom line: High-end specs and a budget price make the OnePlus 5T a great phone. Easy modifications and a large community also make it an excellent choice for rooting and modding.

One more thing: If you are holding onto an older OnePlus device, like the OnePlus 3 or 5, there are already plenty of custom ROMs available.

Why best

The OnePlus 5T is open and affordable.

OnePlus phones all share one common trait — they are easy to root and mod the software. The reason we think the OnePlus 5T is the best is that the low price also means the community is huge.

When you want to go with custom software the best thing you can have is a large group of people that act as a support channel. The OnePlus 5T's low price also makes it a great phone to get if you're looking for a second device to play around with while you use your primary phone to hold all your personal data without compromising its security.

Whether you're new to phone modding or an old hat, we can't help but recommend the OnePlus 5T as the best phone to do any of it.

The flagship option

Google Pixel 2

See at Verizon See at Best Buy See at Google Store See ta Project Fi

While the standard Pixel 2 is the cheaper of the two options, it's still not a phone anyone would consider inexpensive. But it's still an excellent phone if you want to customize your software.

The Pixel 2 is packed with a Snapdragon 835 processor and 4GB of RAM. It's available with up to 128GB of storage space. The thing simply flies, even without any tinkering. But because it's a phone from Google, you're able to unlock the software and do just about anything to it, all the while having a path back to "normal" in the form of factory software.

Bottom line: If you're looking to mod the very best, the Google Pixel 2 is it.

One more thing: Unlocking the bootloader and installing other software doesn't automatically void the warranty!.

Conclusion

You can root and mod almost every Android phone. We tend to focus on the ones you can't because they are outliers. But being able to do it through an exploit or other sometimes difficult process isn't ideal.

If you're looking ahead and know you'll want to change something on your next phone that requires custom software or root access, these phones are the best options.

Best overall

OnePlus 5T

See at OnePlus

OnePlus phones have been fan favorites among Android enthusiasts since the company was started because they're cheap and run well. The 5T is no exception.

OnePlus makes it easy to unlock the bootloader and install alternative software, and the relatively low price will make for a large development community. A strange positive is that issues with the factory software mean that more people are interested in modding the OnePlus 5T, which makes a large community even larger.

If you are looking to spend some money on a phone just so you can hack away at it, the OnePlus 5T is worth looking at.

Bottom line: High-end specs and a budget price make the OnePlus 5T a great phone. Easy modifications and a large community also make it an excellent choice for rooting and modding.

One more thing: If you are holding onto an older OnePlus device, like the OnePlus 3 or 5, there are already plenty of custom ROMs available.

Updated November 2017: Moved OnePlus 5T to the top spot and added the Pixel 2 as the flagship option. Goodbye, Nexus 5X, we'll miss you and your $200 price.

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2 days ago

Here are leaked images of Alcatel's higher-end lineup for 2018

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A quick look at some of Alcatel's offerings for 2018.

Alcatel's not the most popular phone brand around, but the company has proven to be able to kick out some really solid handsets for not a lot of cash (one of the most recent examples being the Alcatel Idol 5). Evan Blass shared an image of the company's higher-end lineup for 2018 back in October, but we now have higher-resolution shots of all the handsets that were previously leaked.

(Left to right) Alcatel 5, 3V, 3X

The devices include the Alcatel 5, 3V, 3X, 3, 3C, and 1X – ranging from highest to lowest-end in that order. There aren't any accompanying specifications to go along with the images, but that doesn't mean we can't infer anything about what's being shown off here.

In regards to the most premium of the bunch, the Idol 5 features a pretty unique design that should help it to stand out a fair bit. There's a pretty large top bezel, but very slim ones on the bottom and sides. The phone appears to be made out of metal, but strangely enough, there's only a single camera. If you want dual cameras, you'll have to go with either the Alcatel 3V or 3X.

(Left to right) Alcatel 3, 3C, 1X

A glass construction appears to be present for the 3V, 3X, 3, and 3C, but the cheaper 1X features a plastic one. The 1X is also the only phone of the bunch that doesn't have a fingerprint sensor.

It's unclear when in 2018 Alcatel will release these phones or how much they'll cost, but if past devices are anything to go by, we'll be looking at competent Android handsets that are very competitively priced.

Alcatel Idol 5 review: One of Cricket's best

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2 days ago

Best Android Phone Under $100

Best overall

Moto E4 (with ads)

See at Amazon

The Amazon-exclusive Moto E4 is a $130 phone reduced to $100. The catch? You'll get ads and offers from the retail giant on your lock screen, which may or may not be a deal-breaker depending on how you like to use your phone. (We've got a good breakdown of what those ads look like).

Otherwise, you're getting a decent entry-level Android phone for not a lot of money at all. The Moto E4 looks a lot like the Moto G5, but tones down some of the specs, offering a quad-core Snapdragon 425, 2GB of RAM, 16GB of storage, and an 8MP camera powering the 5-inch 720p display. It all runs Android 7.1.1 Nougat with some great Moto adds-ons.

Bottom line: Putting up with lock screen ads allows you to get a $130 phone for $100. It's not perfect, but it's a lot better than you'd otherwise get for the cash.

One more thing: It's unlocked, so you can use it on any carrier of your choice. And if you know where to look, there are some places on the Internet that'll help you take care of those pesky ads.

Why the Moto E4 is best

Amazon plugs the price gap with offers on your lock screen.

With ads from Amazon, or without ads from Verizon, the Moto E4 gets you a great core Android experience — fast software, thanks to Motorola's hands-off approach towards customization — and decent specs all-round.

It's not the flashiest or showiest smartphone, with a relatively generic design, but you don't expect pizzaz when you're paying a Benjamin for a full-featured smartphone. The phone also retains the impressive features of its more-expensive Moto G5 counterpart, including a great autofocus camera and a front fingerprint sensor.

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Best ad-free

Moto E4 Plus

See at Boost

You probably aren't surprised to see another Moto phone on this list, because they're just the pinnacle of value. For $99.99, you get a fast fingerprint sensor, some light water resistance (but not IP68, so don't go dunking the Moto E4 Plus in a pool), and a ridiculous 5000 mAh with fast charging. If Boost's pricing were available on the unlocked model, this phone would easily overtake the Prime-Exclusive Moto E4 as our top overall recommendation.

Bottom line: You won't find a bigger battery and cleaner software experience for the money.

One more thing: Boost offers an additional 10% off if you're ordering online, making the Moto E4 Plus an even better bang for your buck.

Best on Verizon

Moto E4

See at Verizon

If you're on Verizon prepaid, you can snag our best overall pick, the Moto E4, for even less than the ad-filled one from Amazon. While this version will be locked to Verizon, it's also just $70.

Bottom line: Trading ads for bloatware gets you Moto's best super-cheap phone for less — if you're on Verizon.

One more thing: Don't expect software updates to be as quick as the unlocked version.

Best on Cricket Wireless (AT&T)

LG Harmony

See at Cricket Wireless

If you want to get a prepaid phone from one of the big four carriers, your choices are limited, but AT&T's Cricket sub-brand has a great selection, including the LG Harmony for $100. It's got a big 5.3-inch HD display, a quad-core processor, 2800mAh battery, and Android 7.0 Nougat.

Bottom line: LG's got a strong prepaid game these days, and the Harmony is no exception.

One more thing: Don't expect many updates with this phone. That's the price of prepaid.

Best on MetroPCS (T-Mobile)

Samsung Galaxy J7 Prime

See at MetroPCS

MetroPCS's Galaxy J7 Prime has some pretty competitive specs for the sub-$100 price range. You're looking at a 1.6GHz octa-core processor, 3GB of RAM, and 16GB of expandable storage.

Its display is on the larger side at 5.5" inches, and the 3300 mAh battery should be more than enough to last you through the day.

Bottom line: You get a large battery, an equally large screen, and Android 7.0, which is hard to beat at this price.

One more thing: The Galaxy J7 Prime is actually $139 upfront with a $40 mail-in rebate. This is how almost every phone at MetroPCS is sold, but you can get a little closer to $100 out of pocket with the Galaxy J3 Prime, which runs $109 upfront.

Best on Boost Mobile (Sprint)

Moto E4 Plus

See at Boost

You probably aren't surprised to see another Moto phone on this list, because they're just the pinnacle of value. For $99.99, you get a fast fingerprint sensor, some light water resistance (but not IP68, so don't go dunking the Moto E4 Plus in a pool), and a ridiculous 5000 mAh with fast charging. If Boost's pricing were available on the unlocked model, this phone would easily overtake the Prime-Exclusive Moto E4 as our top overall recommendation.

Bottom line: You won't find a bigger battery and cleaner software experience for the money.

One more thing: Boost offers an additional 10% off if you're ordering online, making the Moto E4 Plus an even better bang for your buck.

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Conclusion

You'll need to put up with the occasional ad, but Amazon's offer of a Moto E4 for under $100 is really hard to beat. But there are plenty of other great sub-$100 devices out there — you just have to put up with a few compromises.

Best overall

Moto E4 (with ads)

See at Amazon

The Amazon-exclusive Moto E4 is a $130 phone reduced to $100. The catch? You'll get ads and offers from the retail giant on your lock screen, which may or may not be a deal-breaker depending on how you like to use your phone. (We've got a good breakdown of what those ads look like).

Otherwise, you're getting a decent entry-level Android phone for not a lot of money at all. The Moto E4 looks a lot like the Moto G5, but tones down some of the specs, offering a quad-core Snapdragon 425, 2GB of RAM, 16GB of storage, and an 8MP camera powering the 5-inch 720p display. It all runs Android 7.1.1 Nougat with some great Moto adds-ons.

Bottom line: Putting up with lock screen ads allows you to get a $130 phone for $100. It's not perfect, but it's a lot better than you'd otherwise get for the cash.

One more thing: It's unlocked, so you can use it on any carrier of your choice. And if you know where to look, there are some places on the Internet that'll help you take care of those pesky ads.

Update November 2017: We've replaced the Moto E LTE with the Moto E4 Plus as the best ad-free option, and revamped some of the carrier choices because they were either no longer available, or no longer the best options.

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2 days ago

Google Assistant can help troubleshoot your Pixel 2

6

If you own a Pixel 2, the Assistant can now help troubleshoot basic Bluetooth, camera, and battery issues.

The Google Assistant's list of various functions has grown far too large to list off every single one at this point, and while that's great, it also means that certain tricks can slip between the cracks every now and then. In the latest discovery, it appears that the Assistant (at least on Pixel 2 devices) can help troubleshoot some basic issues.

Initially spotted by Android Police, asking Assistant "why is my phone not charging" or telling it to "troubleshoot camera" will initiate a troubleshooting session where it'll ask you various questions about the issue you're having. If the Assistant can't help you resolve whatever problem you've run into, it'll ask if you want it to contact Google Support on your behalf.

The official Pixel Phone Help pages on Google's support site list the Assistant as a way for getting help with battery and Bluetooth issues, but the Assistant has also been discovered to aid with camera problems as well.

Troubleshooting with the Assistant is reported to work on Pixel 2 handsets running the Developer Preview for Android 8.1, but I also managed to get it working on my Pixel 2 running the latest November security patch for Android 8.0. However, no matter which version of Oreo you're running, this functionality does seem to be limited to the Pixel 2 for the time being.

Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL

Google Store Project Fi Verizon Best Buy

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2 days ago

Best Android Phone Over $700

Samsung Galaxy S8

Best overall

Samsung Galaxy Note 8

See at Verizon See at AT&T See at T-Mobile See at Sprint See at Best Buy See at Amazon

Samsung's big-screened flagship phone delivers just about everything you could want from a premium handset — and with outright prices approaching $1,000, you'd hope so. The centerpiece of the Note 8 is its gorgeous 6.3-inch SuperAMOLED display, which can reach a dizzying 1,2000 nits in bright daylight for maxium visibility. You also get Qualcomm's latest Snapdragon 835 processor (or Samsung's latest Exynos 8895 processor outside North America), plus 6GB of RAM and 64GB of storage as standard.

The solid camera experience of the GS8 has been augmented by a second telephoto lens, the first zoom lens with OIS (optical image stabilization) in an Android phone. And that's backed up by all the core features you'd expect from a modern Samsung phone, like water resistance and fast wireless charging. And the S Pen is more useful than ever, with a bunch of new features.

Bottom line: The Galaxy Note 8 reigns supreme in the premium Android segment, with excellent performance across the board, only tarnished slightly by wonky fingerprint scanner placement.

One more thing:Want to pay a little less and get a slightly larger battery? Take a look at the Galaxy S8+.



Why the Galaxy Note 8 is the best

Samsung has successfully shrugged off the unfortunate legacy of the Note 7, returning with a fantastic handset that builds on the solid foundations of the Galaxy S8 series.

In addition to a slightly angular take on the S8's design, Galaxy Note 8 owners will get everything we loved about the S8+, with a bigger and better display, the added utility of the S Pen, and a dual camera setup that introduces some really fun and creative photo possibilities. A phone that demand such a high asking price needs to excel across the board, and the Note 8 lives up to the high standards we demand from a phone in this price category.

The only thing your money won't buy you is the latest version of Android Oreo out of the box — the Note 8's still on Nougat for now.

Best runner-up

Google Pixel 2 XL

Google Pixel XL

See at Verizon See at Best Buy See at Google Store

The Google Pixel 2 XL gets the number-two spot here, but its basically a coin toss between these two handsets. They're both really, really good.

Despite some controversy around display quality — for what it's worth, the Note 8 definitely wins in this area — the larger of Google's two second-gen Pixel phones is a force to be reckoned with. It packs top-tier specs, a unique painted aluminum chassis in either black or panda black-and-white colors. And the curved glass front, while not quite as bezelless as Samsung's current phones, looks sleek and futuristic.

The Pixel 2 XL also boasts the latest version of Android Oreo out of the box, with speedy updates to Android 8.1 and beyond. And the rear camera, with Google's HDR+ technology, ranks as the best smartphone camera out there right now.

If you want a cleaner Android experience, or the latest software, or if Samsung's designs just don't do it for you, the Pixel 2 XL is a great alternative.

Bottom line: For a clean, fast and simple Android experience with probably the best low-light camera on any phone, the Pixel 2 XL is a fantastic choice.

One more thing: Since you're likely buying the Pixel 2 XL unlocked anyway, consider Google's own carrier, Project Fi.



Best tough phone

Samsung Galaxy S8 Active

Moto Z Force Droid

See at AT&T See at T-Mobile

Available on AT&T and T-Mobile in the United States, the Galaxy S8 Active is the latest ruggedized take on a modern Samsung flagship. Once again, building on the basis of the regular Galaxy S8, the Active model sports a chunkier, more durable chassis, loses the curved dispay and boasts an enormous 4,000mAh battery for epic longevity.

Add to that all your core GS8 features, likea great 12-megapixel rear camera, a bright screen and strong performance, and you've got the best tough Android phone you can buy.

Bottom line: It's not as pretty as the regular GS8, but the Active pulls ahead with a giant battery and a less accident-prone chassis.

One more thing: The Active is only available on AT&T and T-Mobile, so your buying options are much more limited compared to the Note 8 or GS8.

Conclusion

If you're looking to spend top dollar on a phone, our top choice is the Galaxy Note 8. It's followed closely by Google's top-end Pixel 2 XL, though, and if you need something tougher (and you live in the United States), you can consider the Galaxy S8 Active.

Best overall

Samsung Galaxy Note 8

See at Verizon See at AT&T See at T-Mobile See at Sprint See at Best Buy See at Amazon

Samsung's big-screened flagship phone delivers just about everything you could want from a premium handset — and with outright prices approaching $1,000, you'd hope so. The centerpiece of the Note 8 is its gorgeous 6.3-inch SuperAMOLED display, which can reach a dizzying 1,2000 nits in bright daylight for maxium visibility. You also get Qualcomm's latest Snapdragon 835 processor (or Samsung's latest Exynos 8895 processor outside North America), plus 6GB of RAM and 64GB of storage as standard.

The solid camera experience of the GS8 has been augmented by a second telephoto lens, the first zoom lens with OIS (optical image stabilization) in an Android phone. And that's backed up by all the core features you'd expect from a modern Samsung phone, like water resistance and fast wireless charging. And the S Pen is more useful than ever, with a bunch of new features.

Bottom line: The Galaxy Note 8 reigns supreme in the premium Android segment, with excellent performance across the board, only tarnished slightly by wonky fingerprint scanner placement.

One more thing:Want to pay a little less and get a slightly larger battery? Take a look at the Galaxy S8+.

Update, November 2017: The Galaxy Note 8 is our new winner, closely followed by the Google Pixel 2 XL. And the new best tough phone is the Galaxy S8 Active.

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2 days ago

Huawei Mate 10 Pro now on sale at Vodafone UK; first 1,000 orders get a free Huawei Watch 2

0

Huawei's latest flagship is now available from Vodafone UK.

The Huawei Mate 10 Pro is now up for sale from Vodafone UK. You'll be able to pick up the handset for £46 per month for 24 months when you pay an upfront fee of just £10, which gives you access to unlimited texts, calls, and 4GB of monthly LTE data . Vodafone is incentivizing the launch by giving away a free Huawei Watch 2 to the first 1,000 customers.

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2 days ago

How much storage have you used so far on your Pixel 2?

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Thank goodness for generous storage amounts.

One of the smaller changes that Google made this year with the Pixel 2 was the amount of storage available for the base model. Unlike last year's Pixel that came with a minimum of 32GB, the Pixel 2 comes equipped with 64GB at the very least. That's a healthy amount of space for most folks, but if you really need the added room, you can still increase it to 128GB for an extra $100.

Some of our forum users recently got to talking about how they've been using their local space with the Pixel 2 so far, and these are a few of the responses.

*/
Almeuit 11-14-2017 12:31 PM “

I will lose this most likely (jk.. I know I will haha) but how is your storage working for you on your Pixel 2/XL? I have the 128 GB Pixel 2 XL and I have loaded up a good amount of media. Mainly just my playlists from Google Play Music, anime from Netflix, and some movies I enjoy from Vudu/etc. I do have unlimited data (Verizon) so I still stream certain things (such as Crunchyroll - an...

Reply
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Ca_lvn 11-14-2017 12:58 PM “

My primary means of storage on this phone will be photos, I plan on exploring the camera a lot more, at that point most likely I'll have to delete from the phone. I kept it on a budget with the 64 gigabyte drive. Surprisingly I have 85 apps installed, kind of hard to believe I have that many on the phone. Google photos is my guaranteed safe backup so I'm confident that will meet all my...

Reply
*/
paradroid 11-14-2017 01:48 PM “

24 out of 128 gigs used. I don't watch cartoons so none of those stored. For movies I wouldn't waste watching a good one on a 6 inch phone screen, I'd use my 65 inch Ultra Hi Def TV with surround sound. If I did need to watch a movie on the go (flying overseas) I'd use my tablet or laptop for the bigger screen. Downloaded music from google play takes minimal space. My 500 albums are all...

Reply
*/
Almeuit 11-16-2017 03:39 PM “

I currently have 42% free space on my 128 GB variant :).

Reply

Now, we'd like to pass the question on to you – How much storage have you used on your Pixel 2?

Join the conversation in the forums!

Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL

Google Store Project Fi Verizon Best Buy

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2 days ago

HTC U11 Life (Android One) review: Keep it simple

5
HTC U11 Life

HTC's first Android One device has everything you want from a mid-range phone — with highlights including Oreo out of the box, and a surprisingly capable camera.

Android One has arrived in Europe, and HTC is one of the first manufacturers to ship an affordable, Google-branded phone. The Android One badge made its debut in India and parts of Asia, as Google emphasized quality software on super-cheap hardware. But with its latest round of "One" handsets, the prices are higher, the products more premium, and the hand on the software rudder a little firmer.

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2 days ago

OnePlus 5T is coming to India on Nov 21 for ₹32,999 — the same price as the OnePlus 5

1

The OnePlus 5T will launch at the same price point as its predecessor in India.

India is a key market for OnePlus, and the company is looking to stay competitive in the mid-range segment with the OnePlus 5T. The phone will make its debut in the country starting November 21 via an early access sale on Amazon India, with general availability kicking off from November 28. Crucially, the OnePlus 5T will debut at the same price point as the OnePlus 5: the 64GB variant will retail for ₹32,999 ($507), whereas the 128GB edition will cost ₹37,999 ($585).

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2 days ago

Download the official OnePlus 5T wallpapers right here

4

A few wallpapers to make your current phone look like OnePlus's latest.

After weeks upon weeks of leaks and rumors, OnePlus finally took the wraps off of the OnePlus 5T on November 16. The phone is shaping up to be one of the absolute best ways to spend $500 on a new device, and if you're anxiously awaiting November 21 to get here so you can order the phone, you can now download all of the 5T's official wallpapers.

The most notable feature with the OnePlus 5T is its large 6-inch AMOLED display with a resolution of 2160 x 1080. The aspect ratio's been changed to a more modern 18:9, and like a lot of other phones we've seen this year, OnePlus drastically slimmed down the bezels from every angle.

In an attempt to show off the true power and capabilities of the 5T's display, the wallpapers that ship with it are, unsurprisingly, filled with a lot of bright and vibrant colors. There are five new wallpapers that'll be available on the 5T when it's released, but if you want to download them to your phone right now, you can do just that.

Check them all out below!

OnePlus 5T hands-on preview: Relentless iteration

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3 days ago

OnePlus 5T vs. OnePlus 3T: Should you upgrade?

5
OnePlus 5T and OnePlus 3T

The iterative march can make it tough to know when to upgrade.

The average OnePlus phone owner likely upgrades faster than owners of other brands, but even they have limits. Most won't drop the money to get a new phone every six months ... but jumping up every year is totally reasonable. With the release of the OnePlus 5T there are a whole lot of OnePlus 3T owners eyeballing this upgrade who understandably passed on the quick jump to the original OnePlus 5 while their own purchase was still nice and fresh. And there are probably many OnePlus 3 owners feeling the same way, not wanting to wait another half a year for whatever succeeds it.

Whether you're hanging onto a OnePlus 3 or the slightly upgraded 3T, we want to give you the information you need to know if the OnePlus 5T is a worthy upgrade at $499.

What's the same

OnePlus 5T and OnePlus 3T

OnePlus has held a pretty amazing consistency in its flagships from the original OnePlus One up to today's 5T. Though the exterior of the OnePlus 5T looks quite different from the 3 or 3T, the core experience of using the phone hasn't changed all that much. Android 7.1 Nougat on the OnePlus 3 and 3T is near-identical to what ships on the 5T, and all three phones are slated for the Android 8.0 Oreo update by the end of 2017.

The core experience of using the phone hasn't changed much from the OnePlus 3 to the 5T.

Performance, too, is extremely consistent between the phones. Though the OnePlus 3 may seem "old" to phone nerds, its Snapdragon 820 processor and 6GB of RAM are more than capable of pushing this nimble OxygenOS software and all of the latest apps at nearly the same pace as a Snapdragon 835 and (potentially) 8GB of RAM on the latest OnePlus 5T.

Beyond the software being displayed on the screen, the core hardware experience hasn't changed much either. We'll talk about the design changes below, but when you think about the basic hardware features — like ports, buttons, speaker, radios, etc. — you'll find few discrepancies between the previous generation and the latest. Again, it's worth remembering that even the OnePlus 3 isn't particularly old at this point, and when it was released it had most of the latest and greatest internals — they've aged well.

What's different

OnePlus 5T and OnePlus 3T

The most obvious difference with this upgrade is the change of hardware design. OnePlus is using the same simple, solid and efficient hardware in the 5T as it did back with the 3, but it's much more sleek and refined in 2017. The OnePlus 5T has a bit more character, more polish and more style when set next to the generic-looking OnePlus 3. The feel isn't much different between the two, but looks are important.

There's no doubt the OnePlus 5T feels like a far more 'modern' phone.

The same goes with the view from the front, where the 6-inch 2:1 display on the OnePlus 5T just feels more modern compared to the larger bezels surrounding a 5.5-inch 16:9 display on the older phones. And it isn't just for looks: you get the benefit of more usable screen space in effectively the same package, too, and the fingerprint sensor is just as usable on the back of the phone. The Optic AMOLED display panel itself isn't notably improved from last year, but getting more of it in the same basic package is a win-win.

We've established that the OnePlus 5T doesn't necessarily have a huge lead in terms of performance today compared to the older phones, but its newer specs certainly give it a longer runway into the future. The Snapdragon 820 holds up just fine today, but how about in another year? It won't feel the same as the 5T's Snapdragon 835. And that brings up a larger point about the future of software on these phones: the OnePlus 3 and 3T are likely done with official software support following the Oreo update, while the 5T will see at least the "P" release in 2018.

The 5T's specs aren't game-changing today, but they will help a ton going forward.

The one clear point of differentiation in terms of specs and their actual effect on your daily use right off the bat will be when talking about battery. The OnePlus 3's 3000mAh capacity is of course 10% smaller than the 5T's 3300mAh, but the newer phone also has a much more efficient processor on board to make better use of it. That's a real-world improvement you'll see in battery life day after day. Now when talking about the OnePlus 3T with its 3400mAh capacity, you won't see much of a difference — you can't argue with that extra capacity.

The camera comparison between these phones is a bit of a mixed bag as well. You can quite easily argue that the OnePlus 5T's newer sensor, secondary lens for low light and Portrait Mode as a complete package is better overall than the single 16MP camera on the OnePlus 3 and 3T. But in many shooting conditions that old camera — with its optical image stabilization — is going to do an admirable job that'll compare favorably to the OnePlus 5T. Yes the newer phone has more features, but in terms of raw shot-to-shot photo quality OnePlus just hasn't made massive strides in the last year.

Should you upgrade?

As you can see, OnePlus hasn't made huge improvements in features or performance when comparing the OnePlus 5T to even the original OnePlus 3. But that really is more of a testament to how well the OnePlus 3 has held up over time than the OnePlus 5T being unattractive on its own. OnePlus takes a relatively conservative approach, and isn't particularly willing to throw out features or specs with the new phone — it instead refines in some areas and adds in others to give you a better phone with each generation.

This isn't a 'sure thing' sort of upgrade, but you can find reason for it — and it may not be expensive.

When you look at things this way, it's easy to say that your can be happy with your OnePlus 3T or even OnePlus 3 at the end of 2017, choosing to not drop the extra money on a new OnePlus 5T that isn't a substantial upgrade. Yes the hardware is nicer, the screen is larger and the specs give you more runway for the future; but today you'll get almost the same experience using a OnePlus 3 as you do on the OnePlus 5T.

The one thing making this upgrade decision interesting is how well OnePlus phones seem to hold their value on the used market. Browsing OnePlus listings on popular trade site Swappa shows OnePlus 3s still selling for over $200, and 3Ts often snagging upwards of $300. That's a solid return on a phone that's at least a year old, and gets you about half way toward your new OnePlus 5T, should you decide to upgrade.

If you're willing to sell on your OnePlus 3 or 3T, you can hop onto the latest and greatest from the company for what comes out to a modest investment. And in doing so, you're getting a phone with a longer runway into the future and the same great day-to-day OnePlus experience you already know and love.

OnePlus 5T and OnePlus 5

OnePlus Amazon

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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3 days ago

Best Large Android Phone

Best Overall

Samsung Galaxy Note 8

See at Verizon See at AT&T See at T-Mobile See at Sprint See at Best Buy See at Amazon

Forget last year's missteps — the Samsung Galaxy Note line is back in style. This year's Note takes everything we loved about the Galaxy S8 Plus and adds even more display real estate, an impressive new dual-camera rig, boasting 2X telephoto with optical image stabilization, and new features for the S Pen stylus, including animated written messages.

Samsung's best-in-class display gets even better with new capabilities including a 1200-nit daylight mode. And the Note's performance is supercharged thanks to 6GB of RAM as standard, and software enhancements in Samsung Experience 8.5.

You of course get Samsung's trademark S Pen stylus, which is smarter than ever in the seventh-generation Note. But the biggest reason to invest in one of the priciest Android phones on the market might be the Note 8's new dual camera setup. The main camera mirrors the excellent performance of the GS8, while the secondary shooter captures zoomed in shots with greater detail than any Android phone, thanks to its 12-megapixel resolution and optical stabilization.

Bottom line: The Galaxy Note 8 boasts a fearsome price tag, but it's easily the best handset in this category. Between the display, performance, cameras, and productivity features, there's no better big-screened phone

One more thing: The Note 8's fingerprint scanner is in kind of an awkward place — not unlike the Galaxy S8. And in addition, the face unlock and iris scanning features can be temperamental.

Why the Galaxy Note 8 is the best

Simply put, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 is the best at almost everything it does.

Samsung's latest big-screened handset steps out from the shadow of the Note 7, excelling across the board and building on the success of the Galaxy S8 line. The huge 6.3-inch SuperAMOLED display looks fantastic, with the best daylight visibility we've seen in a phone and bright, vibrant colors. And the phone itself is beautiful, with a symmetrical design that shows off its epic display.

What's more, the Note 8 has everything you could ask for in a high-end handset with a top-tier dual camera array, software that's differentiated but not overbearing, and speedy performance.


Best alternative

Google Pixel 2 XL

See at Verizon See at Best Buy See at Google Store

The larger of Google's two second-generation Pixel phones brings a tall 18:9 display with slimmer bezels, a big battery, an excellent camera, and the best software experience on any Android phone. There's a curved "3D glass" front, a unqiue painted metal exterior, along with water- and dust-resistance capabilities and 64GB of storage as standard — big, necessary upgrades from the older Pixels.

You'll of course get Android Oreo out of the box, with the promise of swift updates to future versions of the OS, along with some excellent software customizations from Google. Google Lens will tell you what' in your photos, and "Now Playing" can identify songs in the background without using mobile data. And to top it off, Google's second-generation Pixel camera excels across the board, with legendary low-light and high-contrast capabilities. While the display isn't the best out there, it's still decent, and the rest of the phone is absolutely top-tier.

Bottom line: Despite some concerns around the screen, the Google Pixel 2 XL is a phenomenal smartphone with awesome software, and the best camera out there.

One more thing: We have to pick one overall winner, but the Pixel 2 XL is about equal with the Note 8, on balance. It just depends what your priorities are.



Best for battery life

Huawei Mate 10 / Mate 10 Pro

See at Amazon

Chinese manufacturer Huawei continues to go from strength to strength, and the latest Mate 10 phones — in particular the Mate 10 Pro — stand out as great overall devices with particular focus on battery life. Both Mate 10s are fast, run Huawei's Android Oreo-based EMUI 8 software, and run the new Kirin 970 chip, which comes with cutting-edge AI hardware for added future-proofing.

Beyond its size and software, the Mate 10 series nails the fundamentals of a great Android experience, with quick performance and between 64 and 128GB of storage as standard, plus microSD expansion on the regular Mate 10, and one of the best dual camera setups we've seen. Unlike Huawei combines two cameras with the same focal length, but with one OIS (optical image stabilization) 12MP camera capturing colors, and the other, a 20MP monochrome sensor, picking up fine detail, behind super-bright f/1.6 lenses. The result is a camera setup that goes toe-to-toe with the Google Pixel 2 in many situations.

Bottom line: Huawei has nailed the camera experience this time around, and that, combined with the Mate line's historic strength in battery life, make for a great device.

One more thing: We're still waiting for the Mate 10 series to launch properly, though Amazon pre-orders for the regular model are available, and a European launch for the Pro is immiment.

Best for less

LG V30

See at AT&T See at Verizon See at Sprint See at T-Mobile

LG has successfully built on the G6 with its best big-screened phone to date, the V30. The V30 takes the design of its G-series forerunner and smoothes out the angles, with curved Gorilla Glass 5 front and back, polished aluminum on the sides, and plenty of power lurking within. It's also LG's first flagship phone in more than two years with an OLED screen, and while it's not quite as spectacular as the Note 8's Super AMOLED, LG's latest display is great in its own right.,

On the inside, you get a standard loadout of high-end smartphone specs: Snapdragon 835, 4GB of RAM and 64GB of storage (or 128GB if you get the V30+). But as with most LG phones over the past year or so, the biggest reason to choose the V30 might be its camera capabilities. The main shooter is a 16-megapixel unit with a new, super-bright f/1.6 lens, with OIS. And that's paired with a brighter wide-angle camera with f/1.9 aperture, so you can capture dramatic 120-degree views even in low light.

LG has also built out new cinematic video shooting features in the new Cine LOG recording mode, which is great for videographers wanting to edit footage from the phone in Final Cut or Adobe Premiere.

Bottom line: The V30 is a great overall package. If you want many of the top features of the Note 8 without breaking the bank, LG's latest is well worth a look.

One more thing: No more weird regional variations! All V30s come with LG's famed Quad DAC for high-quality wired audio, as well as wireless charging and IP68 water resistance.

Best 'Almost a Note 8' phone

Samsung Galaxy S8+

See at Verizon See at AT&T See at T-Mobile See at Sprint See at Best Buy See at Amazon

Samsung delivers a great big-screened Android experience in the larger of the two Galaxy S8 models. The new 18.5:9 aspect ratio, combined with a 6.2-inch display size (6.1 inches excluding the rounded corners) makes the Galaxy S8+ big, but not impossible to hold. And the extra height of that beautiful Quad HD+ SuperAMOLED panel means you'll fit more on screen, too.

The design work Samsung started in 2016 can be seen coming to fruition in the GS8+, with an almost completely symmetrical metal and glass chassis that complements the big screen. And Samsung nails the fundamentals of the smartphone experience too, with fast performance and a great camera, improved from the GS7 thanks to new processing tricks. On the software side, Samsung's UI feels more polished and mature than ever, with a new sci-fi aesthetic that's slick and unique but not overbearing.

Bottom line: It's expensive for sure, but the Samsung Galaxy S8+ easily one of the best phablets out there.

One more thing: The Galaxy S8+'s fingerprint scanner is in kind of an awkward place, around the back and next to the camera lens. But at least you've got face unlock and iris scanning to fall back on.

Conclusion

If you want the best Android has to offer in a big-screened phone, look no further than the Samsung Galaxy Note 8. The size of Samsung's 6.3-incher is both a strength and a weakness — thanks to the extra-tall 18.5:9 aspect ratio, this is a very tall phone. But if that's what you're after, Samsung does a great job of showcasing an enormous, bright display and backing up a great physical design with good-looking software and unique software tricks, the S Pen and a fantastic dual camera setup.

Best Overall

Samsung Galaxy Note 8

See at Verizon See at AT&T See at T-Mobile See at Sprint See at Best Buy See at Amazon

Forget last year's missteps — the Samsung Galaxy Note line is back in style. This year's Note takes everything we loved about the Galaxy S8 Plus and adds even more display real estate, an impressive new dual-camera rig, boasting 2X telephoto with optical image stabilization, and new features for the S Pen stylus, including animated written messages.

Samsung's best-in-class display gets even better with new capabilities including a 1200-nit daylight mode. And the Note's performance is supercharged thanks to 6GB of RAM as standard, and software enhancements in Samsung Experience 8.5.

You of course get Samsung's trademark S Pen stylus, which is smarter than ever in the seventh-generation Note. But the biggest reason to invest in one of the priciest Android phones on the market might be the Note 8's new dual camera setup. The main camera mirrors the excellent performance of the GS8, while the secondary shooter captures zoomed in shots with greater detail than any Android phone, thanks to its 12-megapixel resolution and optical stabilization.

Bottom line: The Galaxy Note 8 boasts a fearsome price tag, but it's easily the best handset in this category. Between the display, performance, cameras, and productivity features, there's no better big-screened phone

One more thing: The Note 8's fingerprint scanner is in kind of an awkward place — not unlike the Galaxy S8. And in addition, the face unlock and iris scanning features can be temperamental.

Updated November 2017: We've added the Pixel 2 XL and Huawei Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro to our lineup!

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