Headlines

1 month ago

How to use Smart Lock to unlock your phone automatically

6

Using Smart Lock is an easy way to mix security with convenience — keep your Android locked unless you want it unlocked.

Introduced with Android 5.0 Lollipop, Smart Lock lets you set things up so that your phone unlocks its screen when certain conditions are met without entering your password or PIN or fingerprint. You'll find the setting is the Security section of your phone settings, and you begin by tapping it and entering your PIN or passphrase.

Once enabled, Smart Lock has five ways it can intelligently keep your phone unlocked for you but locked if anyone else happens to find it. You might not see every option on every phone so take a peek at your user manual if you can't find a setting.

On-body Detection

On-body Detection uses your phone's motion sensors like the accelerometer or gyroscope to keep it unlocked while it's in your hand, your pocket or a bag. If it senses that you're in motion and you've unlocked your phone with any other method it stays unlocked. When things stop moving it locks the screen.

Of course, if you have unlocked the screen it will stay unlocked when someone else is carrying it, too. On-body Detection tries to "learn" the cadence of how you move, but it's far from perfect and not something that should ever be considered secure — it's simply a convenience feature. To set it up:

  • Tap On-body Detection in the Smart Lock settings menu
  • Toggle the slider switch

Just remember that it may take a few minutes for your phone to realize it's no longer on your body and should lock the screen, and if someone else picks it up they won't have to enter your password or fingerprint to use it.

Trusted Places

Trusted Places uses what's called geofencing to keep your phone unlocked when you're in a specific area and locked everywhere else.

Geofencing uses your phone's location system to define a small area around a specific point inside a virtual fence. The software can tell the rest of the system whether your phone is inside or outside of that fence, and things like unlocking your screen can happen while you're inside the fence. Geofencing is used for a lot of things, not just Smart Lock.

You'll need to set up a location for your home and work places, and for Trusted Places to work you'll need to have location turned on and an internet connection. Once you've enabled location (any of the three options are suitable) you can set up Trusted Places like this:

  • In the Smart Lock settings menu, tap Trusted Places, then tap Home
  • Tap Turn on this location and you'll be asked to choose a "Home" address if you haven't already set one up
  • Set up other places to keep your phone unlocked by tapping Add trusted place

Geofencing is only as accurate as your phone's location sensors. As long as apps like Google Maps or turn-by-turn navigation work for you, Trusted Places will work. And be just as accurate. Just remember that your phone doesn't know who is holding it, just where it's being held and will unlock itself for anyone inside a Trusted Place.

Trusted devices

Your phone can stay unlocked as long as it is connected to a specific Bluetooth device (or in the proximity of an NFC tag on older models) using the Trusted devices setting.

Bluetooth has a very limited range. We sometimes wish it were longer, like when we walk away while wearing headphones, but that limit (in the neighborhood of 30 to 40 feet) is perfect to use as a leash for Trusted devices. As long as you have a good connection to any Bluetooth device — your watch, a luggage or key tag, your car, anything — your phone will stay unlocked. Once the connection drops it locks itself.

You probably were prompted to set up Trusted devices when you first pair a new Bluetooth device, but you can do it manually like this:

  • Tap Trusted devices in the Smart Lock settings menu
  • Tap Add trusted device then tap Bluetooth
  • Choose a paired device from the list

Trusted NFC tags that have been set up previously will continue to work, but you can no longer modify or set up a new Trusted NFC device.

As mentioned, the Trusted devices setting is dependent on your Bluetooth connection. When your phone senses it doesn't have a good connection to any Bluetooth device you have specified it will lock itself. When it si connected it stays unlocked, so if another person has your phone and your watch or keys (or whatever devices you used) it will stay unlocked!

Trusted face

You can use the front-facing camera on your phone to scan your face and unlock it using the Trusted face option.

We'll start by saying that this isn't designed for security — anyone with a half-decent photo of your face can use it to unlock your phone. It's not the same thing as using Iris scanning on a Galaxy phone or Face ID on an iPhone, and is simply using facial recognition software -— the same facial recognition you see in Google Photos. It's another convenience setting and one that's kind of cool.

To set up Trusted face:

  • Tap Trusted face in the Smart Lock settings menu
  • Tap Set up and follow the on-screen directions to scan your face

Depending on the camera hardware inside your phone this will take a minute or two. You'll need to position your face inside a defined area and watch for feedback that it's scanning it. It's not hard.

If you're not getting accurate results using Trusted face you can refine the way your phone "sees" your face by using the Improve face matching setting.

  • In the Smart Lock settings menu, tap on Trusted face
  • Tap Improve face matching
  • Tap Next and follow the on-screen prompt

Just remember that any photo of your face that's in focus can be used to unlock your phone — including photos you have posted on Facebook or other social media. Never think of Trusted face as a high-security option.

Trusted voice

You can unlock your phone using the same "OK Google" phrase you use for Google Assistant by setting up Trusted voice.

Actively listening for your voice while the screen is off takes processing and battery power, so you'll not find the feature available on every Android phone. Once your phone hears the "OK Google" phrase it needs to check and make sure the inflection and tone match what it recognizes as your voice, and if it decides it's you speaking it will unlock itself. Your phone will need to hear you clearly to be able to make the match, and if it does you won't have to enter a password or scan your fingerprint.

To set up Trusted voice:

  • Make sure that you've enabled and set up the "OK Google" hotword for either Google Assistant or Google Now
  • Open the Google app from your app drawer
  • Access the settings menu by tapping the icon in the top left side (the Hamburger menu)
  • Tap Voice then tap OK Google detection
  • Look for any or all of the following settings and enable them:
    • From and screen
    • Always on

Once complete, you can add a Trusted voice in the Smart Lock settings menu by taping Trusted voice.

As mentioned, not every phone supports Trusted voice. Even if your phone does support the feature, it will only be as accurate as the keyword to trigger Assistant or OK Google is. If you have trouble getting your phone to recognize your voice to use Assistant or OK Google, for example, you have a heavy accent or trouble speaking clearly, you'll have the same issues using it. On recent phones using newer hardware, it uses very little battery and you'll probably never notice it, but it can also have a dramatic impact on battery life on older phones.

Convenience versus security

None of these methods is as secure as a PIN, pattern, password, or fingerprint. We shouldn't forget that. But in many cases, they can be much more convenient, and making it convenient to unlock your phone makes it more likely that you'll set it up with a screen lock in the first place. A locked screen with Trusted face (for example) is much more secure than a phone with no screen lock even though it can be fooled with a good photo.

That's the goal of Smart Lock — to get you to lock your phone and your personal data. When everyone uses a good screen lock it becomes harder for a phone thief to use or resell them and the incentive to steal a phone in the first place goes way down. Not only are you protecting your data and any data you have about your contacts, you're helping everyone when you lock your screen.

Take a minute and set up a good screen lock and use Smart Lock to make things easy if you haven't already!

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

HDMI 2.1: Everything you need to know

11

HDMI 2.1 promises to deliver 10K video, 120 Hz refresh rates and much more. Here's everything you should know about HDMI's next revision.

Earlier this year HDMI 2.1 was unveiled, the latest revision of the now-commonplace audio/video cable standard across consumer electronics. And while still in its early stages, the final specification provides a new spectrum of high-end features, designed to deliver premium home entertainment experiences. With improvements focusing on both video consumption and gaming, HDMI 2.1 lays the foundation for clearer and smoother future. But what does this mean to you?

What is HDMI 2.1?

HDMI 2.1 is the latest revised specification of the HDMI interface, which is used for transmitting both audio and video across modern devices. Having become the go-to solution across consumer electronics, you'll have undoubtedly encountered previous versions of the cable or port over the last decade. And while using a visually identical connector, HDMI 2.1 delivers hardware refinements that push improved video and audio quality.

After its first unveiling at the Consumer Electronics Show in January 2017, HDMI Forum, the body managing the interface's development, has created a specification for HDMI 2.1 going forward. As of November 2017, the specification was finalized, allowing manufacturers to begin adopting the technology itself.

HDMI 2.1's new features

Improved bandwidth

One of the principal developments with HDMI 2.1 is a boost in available bandwidth, allowing for transfer rates up to 48 Gigabits per second (Gbps) – a significant step up from the 18 Gbps available with HDMI 2.0. In contrast to the leap from the 10.2 Gbps offered by its predecessor, HDMI 1.4, HDMI 2.1 represents a significant advancement in the potential throughput. Not only does this allow for improved visual clarity, but other video and audio upgrades have been detailed that take advantage of this overhead.

Higher resolutions and framerates

For general consumers, one of the alluring promises is a leap in both supported resolution and framerates when using an HDMI 2.1 connection. Topping out at 10K resolution and 120 Hz at lower pixel counts, the new revision should provide more than enough flexibility for any consumer display hitting the market for the years ahead.

While 10K video won't be among the mainstream anytime soon, HDMI 2.1 also leverages its improved bandwidth to target lower resolutions. On supported displays, 8K (7,680 pixels x 4,320 pixels) at 60 Hz will be possible, as well as 4K (3,840 × 2,160) at 120 Hz. These resolutions also see the full benefit of High Dynamic Range (HDR) across supported content, with a wider gamut of colors and improved contrast ratio. Stepping up from the limit of 4K at 60Hz imposed with HDMI 2.0, resolutions can now be pushed even further without comprising fluidity.

Dynamic HDR

HDMI 2.1 also ushers in "Dynamic HDR," which extends the potential of existing HDR technology with improved color tuning. When the feature is in use, dynamic metadata is processed on a frame-by-frame basis, allowing color settings and brightness to adapt on the fly. The result is an improvement to how colors are displayed, depending on the current scene. While dynamic metadata is already available over HDMI 2.0 with "Dolby Vision," HDMI 2.1 aims to deliver this to the open HDR10 standard.

More: The difference between HDR10 and Dolby Vision

eARC

In a move to continue simplifying household entertainment centers, HDMI 2.1 adopts support for enhanced audio return channel (eARC), which is used to deliver audio over an HDMI connection to soundbars and receivers. Building on the existing ARC implementation implemented in earlier HDMI specifications, this allows a single HDMI to send and receive audio, reducing the cabling between external devices.

eARC is an extension of this technology, making your TV the central hub for entertainment, rather than a traditional receiver. With support for integrated TV tuners, streaming apps and other devices connected to the TV via other HDMI ports, the TV can handoff essentially all audio to an external sound system. With support for Dolby Atmos and DTS:X, too, this delivers high-quality sound to audio-only receivers, soundbars, and amplifiers.

Other features of HDMI 2.1

While the most impressive features of HDMI 2.1 deliver improvements to visual clarity and color, several other additions are making an arrival with the specification. Tailored for video playback and gaming, these provide enhancements for more specific scenarios.

For gamers, one of the most promising features of HDMI 2.1 is support for Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) outputs. In essence, VRR adapts the refresh rate of your display to that out outputted content, reducing screen tearing and stuttering, without the input lag suffered when using a similar solution known as V-Sync. This makes for a much smoother overall experience for gamers on supported displays, although has few applications for other content types.

HDMI 2.1 also delivers support for a minor feature known as "Quick Media Switching" (QMS), which streamlines the process of changing media types on the fly. On traditional displays, changing framerate, resolution and other settings can result in a short blackout. If using a QMS-supported display, HDMI 2.1 will smoothen the process of changing source material, without dropping the signal.

Another welcome feature for gamers is support for "Quick Frame Transport" (QFS) – a relatively simple concept, which makes for a snappier experience. When using QFS, frame output latency is reduced, which delivers a much more responsive experience to displays and VR headsets.

To further enhance refresh rates comes "Auto Low Latency Mode" (ALLM), which automatically adjusts latency on the fly, to make for the smoothest, lag-free viewing experience.

Pushing more advanced visuals, "Display Stream Compression" (DSC) is also a part of the new specification, meaning devices can theoretically surpass the 48 Gbps limit on HDMI 2.1 displays. With this feature enhanced, video streams can be compressed on the fly, delivering improved visual quality to supported displays.

Getting started with HDMI 2.1

With the HDMI 2.1 specification only recently having been finalized, development of hardware utilizing the technology is still in the early stages. Despite using the same connector, the revised interface requires dedicated ports and cables designed for the latest specification, meaning there are no consumer setups available that offer its feature set.

To take advantage of all the new features offered by HDMI 2.1, a new "Ultra High-Speed HDMI Cable" will be required. Cables certified for use with the new standard will be built for 48 Gbps transfer rates and all the other features details with the revised specification. As of publication, manufacturers are yet to release cables that have passed the HDMI 2.1 Compliance Test Specification (CTS), however, they are expected to first hit the market sometime in 2018. But be warned – at first, these cables won't be cheap.

Some HDMI 2.1 features are accessible with older HDMI cables, but to get the complete range of features, you'll have to invest in an Ultra High-Speed variant. For example, eARC can be accessed using HDMI High-Speed Cables with Ethernet, while less intensive resolution and frame rate combinations can be output alongside Dynamic HDR using older HDMI cables. Ultra High-Speed cables are backward compatible with older ports, only with older features offered by the port.

The same concept applies to devices themselves, meaning both outputting and receiving devices must support HDMI 2.1 to take full advantage of the interface. Using the same connector means that implementing HDMI 2.1 shouldn't be too challenging for major manufacturers, but due to the infancy of the specification, it will once again be some time before these devices are in the home.

So, should you care about HDMI 2.1?

Not really — at least not yet. While HDMI 2.1 delivers some anticipated premium features, with the specification only recently having been finalized, the technology is still in early stages. It will still be some time before supported devices are available to consumers – and that's not even touching the fact that price will be a major barrier to entry.

4K displays are only just finding a place among the mainstream, meaning the technology showcasing the greatest benefits of HDMI 2.1 will come at a cost. Simply put, HDMI 2.1 is so future-proofed, displays simply haven't caught up to its capabilities. Once HDMI 2.1 is more accessible, there will be welcome improvements for both video and gaming experiences, but you'll have to wait for now.

What is HDR and why should you care?

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Project Fi: What it's like switching between three networks?

7
Project Fi on the Pixel 2

Switching between networks isn't scary, and in fact it's quite useful.

Usually when you sign up for a phone carrier, you're just getting service from that one carrier. That's not the case with Project Fi, which lets your phone actively switch between T-Mobile, Sprint and US Cellular. It's a big selling point for the service, and when you add in Wi-Fi calling and texting it looks like quite the network juggling act.

After using Project Fi for some time, it turns out the regular switching between networks isn't all that confusing after all.

Switching between T-Mobile, Sprint and US Cellular

Project Fi network on the Pixel 2

Project Fi, when paired with a capable phone like the Google Pixel 2, is set up to intelligently choose between T-Mobile, Sprint and US Cellular's networks depending on which one is offering a better signal at the time. We don't really know how Google's deals have been worked out or how the phone determines when to choose one network over another — and with a Project Fi SIM in your phone, the "Cellular network settings" go blank except for a single toggle to toggle mobile data and data roaming (which you wouldn't ever worry about turning off anyway). That means you don't have any control over which network your phone uses, but it's not actually as scary as it first seems.

In our time using the service all around the U.S., we've seen the phone latch onto T-Mobile primarily, typically only moving to Sprint in some rural areas where T-Mobile had weak or no LTE signal to offer. As Sprint has improved its average speeds and reliability over the past couple of years, we've started to see it used more and more as well. Typically, you're most likely to see T-Mobile in dense cities, and Sprint in more rural areas where T-Mobile may not have expansive LTE coverage. You're only likely to see US Cellular in the regions where it actually runs its own network.

Project Fi on Sprint and T-Mobile

The most interesting thing to note is how seamless the transition is between networks when the phone decides to switch. There actually isn't any indication on the phone when it switches, and no matter which network you're on the phone will always display "Fi Network" in the status bar. You can use an app to see which network you're on (SignalCheck is popular), and that's the only way to keep track of the network switching. Most importantly there isn't any change in the experience that indicated a switch had been made — no delay, no cutoff and no slow data.

The network switching is seamless, and simply expands your speeds and coverage.

While there are technically ways to explicitly choose just one network or the other, we wouldn't actually recommend that. Considering how smooth the transition is between networks, there's little reason to bother with manually switching or sticking with one — and it really defeats the purpose of paying what are still above-average per-gigabyte data rates to get access to all three networks.

The one clear downside of this network switching is the lack of simultaneous voice and data when your phone is on the Sprint network — meaning if you receive a call, you won't be able to use data at the same time if your phone happens to be connected to Sprint. This really is the only reason to try and "force" the phone to one network or another ... and the only annoyance of this opaque network switching.

In all, it's a win. Project Fi manages all three networks really well to the point where you can't perceive the changes, and the parts of the country where the networks don't overlap simply gives you more room with data than you'd get by going with a single network.

Then you add in Wi-Fi

Pixel 2 Project Fi Wi-Fi calling

Plain old carrier networks aren't the only story here — there's also a significant part of the Project Fi experience that leans on Wi-Fi (hence the name). The first part of this is built-in Wi-Fi calling and texting, which can utilize your current Wi-Fi connection instead of the cellular networks. This only works when your Wi-Fi connection is deemed fast enough for calls (it doesn't require much speed), but it'll seamlessly drop to the cellular network if necessary without any intervention. This works in the built-in Phone dialer and Google Messenger apps.

This means you can call and text no matter where you are, even out of cellular range, but perhaps the nicest feature about this Wi-Fi calling and texting is that it doesn't require any intervention or settings manipulation on your part. Simply pick up the phone and call or text, and it'll go out over whatever network will handle it. And because your "Fi Basics" charge covers unlimited talk and texts, you don't have to worry about which way it's routed.

Project Fi Wifi Assistant

The other part of the Wi-Fi story with Project Fi is the so-called "Wi-Fi assistant" that automatically connects you to open Wi-Fi as you move about. This is one of the less-understood parts of the service, but it's pretty basic once you know what to expect. If you choose to keep your Wi-Fi turned on at all times and let the Wi-Fi assistant scan for networks (as is the case by default), your phone will automatically connect to any completely open Wi-Fi network that it finds and is "verified as fast and reliable."

It will only connect to networks that are completely open — that is, no password, splash page, "click here to connect" or "watch this advertisement to connect" getting in the way. While at first you may think there are plenty of open networks around you, many of them actually require this extra step of a splash page or some kind of authentication that'll keep your Project Fi phone from connecting. But because you don't have to actively manage it, it's always nice when you look down and see your phone has been saving mobile data by hopping on a coffee shop's free Wi-Fi.

It'll connect to fewer networks than you'd think, but when it does connect it works well.

When your phone does find a completely open Wi-Fi network that it can connect to, it'll connect and you'll be using it for data instead of the cellular network. You'll also automatically be connected to a Google VPN service, which is completely free, and tunnels your connection past the inherently insecure Wi-Fi network and through Google's servers to hit the outside Internet. This is good for your own security, and also helps give you a consistent data connection. When the connection degrades or you start to leave its location, your phone will hand off back to the cellular network — including an ongoing call.

Living the multiple network life

So long as you don't try to tinker much and simply trust what the phone and service can do automatically, you'll be satisfied with the network switching and automatic Wi-Fi access in Project Fi. Having open access to T-Mobile, Sprint and US Cellular means there are fewer places where you'll be left without a mobile data connection. And in areas with bad speeds from one of the three carriers there's a good chance the other two can pick up the slack instead. Network redundancy is always a good thing.

And in places where you have access to Wi-Fi — be it a known network or an open one out in public — the built-in Wi-Fi calling and texting features, along with the help of the Wi-Fi assistant, will let you keep using your phone in areas with bad mobile networks or just to save you a few dollars a month in data usage. It's simple, and for the most part it works — it's a truly useful part of the Project Fi experience.

Google Project Fi

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How to get Google Project Fi service

2
Project Fi app

Signing up for Project Fi is simple, just like the service itself.

Google's own carrier, called Project Fi, has been around for a quite a while now. But given its restrictions on compatible devices and just how infrequently U.S. consumers switch carriers, there's a good chance you've only heard bits and pieces of information about Project Fi but haven't ever actually looked into switching.

Just as you'd expect, it's dead simple to sign up for Project Fi — here's the process.

Early on in its life Project Fi required an invite. That hasn't been the case for a while now. Anyone can go to fi.google.com and sign up now. The only restriction that remains is phone choice. At the time of writing, you can only use a handful of compatible devices from Google and one of its partners. That's the Google Pixel 2 XL, Pixel 2, Android One Moto X4, Pixel XL, Pixel, Nexus 6P, Nexus 5X and Nexus 6. If you have one of these phones, are willing to buy one used or will buy one of the latest devices as part of your Project Fi signup process, you're good to go. Just visit the Project Fi website and get going!

Project Fi setup step 1

Project Fi is tied to your Google account for everything it does. As such, you'll want to use your primary Google account — the one you use for your primary Gmail address, Google Play, Google Payments, etc. It will make the whole process of managing your account and paying your bill much simpler in the future.

Then, you choose what phone number will be associated with your Fi service — a current Google Voice number, a carrier number that you port to Fi, or an entirely new number. This is the "scary" step with lots of words and explanations that are somewhat confusing, but don't worry — it's not as bad as it seems.

If you currently use a Google Voice number as your primary phone number, don't hesitate to port it to Project Fi. You'll still be able to forward phone calls onward to other phones (and Hangouts on the desktop), and make outgoing calls from other phones and computers via that phone number. You lose specialized voicemail greetings and spam filtering, but those aren't worth not going over to Fi for. Just go for it — if you ever cancel Fi, you'll be able to send your number back to Google Voice (for as long as that service is around, anyway).

Even if you hesitate here, you'll realize this is basically your only choice when you get to the next step. If you instead choose to get a new Project Fi number, it'll force you to release your current Google Voice number so you don't have it anymore anyway. This stems from Google's requirement of only having one Google Voice number (aka Fi number) per Google Account. If you want to keep your current Voice number and get a new Fi number, you may consider paying to port that Voice number to a new Google Account instead.

If you don't have or care about Google Voice, you'll most likely want to port your current carrier number into Project Fi. That'll work just like it does when you're switching carriers — enter your carrier account information, and wait for the port to go through. The porting process won't finalize until you have your Project Fi SIM or new phone with the pre-loaded SIM (or eSIM in the case of the Pixel 2) in hand, so you'll still have your current carrier service until you can actually use Project Fi. Onward.

Project Fi setup step 4

Choosing your plan couldn't be simpler — you'll always pay a base price of $20 per month for unlimited talk and texts, and a flat rate of $10 per gigabyte of data (which also works internationally, by the way). The interesting part about Project Fi is that this is just your best guess as to how much data you'll use — for example you could pay $50 up front ($20 base + $30 for 3GB of data), and you'll get refunded for the data you don't use. If you happen to go over your guess, that extra data will just be tacked onto the next bill at the normal $10 per gigabyte rate instead.

You can choose between 1-10GB of data per month, but you're never locked down — at any point during the month you can change your plan, and the new price will kick in at the next billing cycle. So don't stress over what you choose on this page — you'll never pay at a higher rate for overages, and you'll never pay for something you don't use.

That's it for the plan, just one page — now you'll need a phone. If you already have one of the compatible devices listed above, you'll have to verify that you have the device to receive your Project Fi SIM. If you don't have one yet, Google makes it easy to buy one — prices for the phones are the same full price as buying from the Google Store, barring any current specials. You'll pay for the phone at the final step of setup, either up-front or with zero-interest monthly financing.

After confirming your billing and shipping addresses for the order, you'll simply confirm your plan and your phone purchase one last time. You'll notice that there isn't any activation fee for the service, but you will pay applicable sales tax and shipping if you bought a phone.

The payment methods you use will be coming from Google Payments, so you'll have to set that up if you haven't already. Double check, press the "continue" buttons and your Fi service and/or device will be on its way!

Project Fi number port confirmation

When your Project Fi device and/or SIM card arrive, you'll simply have to power up your phone and confirm that you really want your number ported to the carrier. After a couple of hours or so, you'll receive a notification that your number is now on Fi and you're good to go!

Google Project Fi

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

What happens when you 'pause' Project Fi service?

7
What happens when you pause Project Fi service?

This is one of the things that makes this carrier great.

Project Fi does a few innovative things that set it apart subtly from other carrier offerings, and one of the lesser-advertised features is the ability to "pause" service on a whim without any hoops to jump through. Pausing service isn't something offered by other carriers, and lets you simply disable your phone for as long as you want and instantly resume service with the press of a button.

This isn't something you'll be doing all the time on Project Fi, but it does turn out to be a neat feature. We're going to show you how it works.

Why you'd want to pause service, and what happens

Project Fi pausing service

So what exactly happens to your phone when you pause Project Fi service? Just as it sounds, it puts the brakes on all aspects of your phone — no calls, texts or data will work until you resume service again. Of course your phone will still connect to Wi-Fi and work for everything but calls and texts. You'll still be able to make emergency calls, as you would in a phone without a SIM, but you won't be notified of texts or calls that were missed during the paused service. Anyone who tries to text your paused number will get an error saying the number isn't active, and incoming calls just won't arrive.

It immediately sounds like a great way to save money, but understand everything that happens first.

It sounds like a great idea to regularly pause service, particularly if your Project Fi line is a secondary device, but also keep in mind that you lose the ability to use your Project Fi number everywhere when it's paused. That means you can't make or receive calls via Hangouts on your computer, text on other phones via the Hangouts app, or have calls to your Fi number forwarded to other phones with active cell service — everything stops. Unfortunately the warnings about pausing your service aren't super clear about this point, and when you go to send text messages from other device they appear to go through, but don't.

If you do choose to pause service, there's a reward involved. You're refunded a portion of your $20 "Fi Basics" charge for every day of service that you are paused. Just like the refunds that are given for unused data, every day that you have your Fi service paused you'll get back about $0.66 as a refund on your next bill.

As soon as you pause service you'll immediately see a refund posted on your dashboard for the entire remainder of the billing period, but of course that isn't finalized until the month is over. If you happen to resume service within the same billing period, the amount of time you were paused is calculated and the proper refund amount is posted. For example we paused our service for just over 24 hours, and were issued a $0.75 refund that'll be applied to our next bill.

This feature is incredibly important if you want to keep a Project Fi account active for use with the eSIM inside your Google Pixel 2 or 2 XL when you travel internationally, but intend to still use another carrier most of the time. When you aren't using your backup Project Fi service, you can just disable it and not pay a cent.

How to do it if you decide it's right for you

Project Fi pausing service

The ability to pause service isn't hiding from view, but it also isn't exactly something that's advertised as a feature of Project Fi. If you open up the Fi app or website, in the plan details area you'll see a simple button that says "pause service." Select it, and you'll get a roundup and reminder of what happens if you choose to pause. Confirm your decision, and your phone's cellular functions will stop working almost immediately.

You're notified from the moment you pause service that it will automatically resume three months from that date, but of course you can resume service at any time by again opening up the Project Fi app or website. When you resume it'll take a couple minutes to switch back on, and rebooting your phone at the same time is a good idea. But you'll be back up and running in no time at all.

The ability to pause service is pretty great if you will have literally no need for your phone over a set period of time. For example if you're going on a long camping trip in an area where you won't have cellular service anyway, you could simply pause service just before you leave, and come home after a long weekend to a $3 or so refund. It's also a great choice if Fi is a secondary line that you only want to use sometimes but don't rely on the phone number for regular use.

Google Project Fi

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Check to see if you're covered by Google's Project Fi network

6

Networks, when you think about it, come down to one thing: coverage.

If you're not covered where you live, work and travel ... well, nothing else matters. But in partnering with three U.S. carriers — Sprint, T-Mobile and U.S. Cellular — Google's Project Fi definitely has an interesting advantage. (And remember you also have calling available over Wi-Fi when you need it.)

But the question stands: will you have Project Fi coverage where you live, work and travel? And, of course, there's a handy map for that.

To see if you're covered by Google's Project Fi, just visit fi.google.com/coverage and enter your location (state, city, ZIP) on the map — and no matter where you search, you can always zoom and scroll around to see what the surrounding area is like as well.

Like other carriers you'll get a color-coded map that shows you the darkest green for full LTE coverage, or lighter areas for 3G and 2G. The map is pretty good about pointing out specific areas around a state or city that may come up short on coverage, and while the actual real-world experience can never be perfectly mapped this is a great place to start.

Compare Project Fi's coverage map to those from the other carriers, and you may find that it compares quite favorably.

Google Project Fi

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How to choose what you sync on Chrome across devices

5

You can choose exactly what syncs with Google and your computer, and it's easy.

If you have a Chromebook and use Google Chrome on another computer, here's a quick tip about choosing what you synchronize between them.

On our Chromebooks, many of us install apps and extensions that add more features and functionality. That's how Chrome OS was designed, with it's own online store full of apps and extensions, and there are plenty of useful ones included. But things you might want on your Chromebook — for example a small text editor or online image editor — also might be things you don't want on a Windows or Mac (or Linux) laptop or desktop. Plenty of software comes bundled into those operating systems, and often it makes no sense to have duplicate programs for productivity or entertainment. The good news is it's easy to manage.

You can choose exactly what Chrome syncs across your devices. To get there, make sure you're signed in with your Google account and follow these steps.

  1. Open the settings
  2. Under People, click the entry labeled "Sync"
  3. In the window that opens, adjust the toggles to sync what you like, or toggle the Sync Everything switch if you just want to do it all.

You'll find an entry for everything that Chrome can synchronize, both on your Chromebook and with the Chrome browser on any platform. Extensions and Apps are the focus of this article, but you can choose to not sync other data, like passwords or browser history, if you like. You can even choose to not sync anything if that suits you better. Some things — like browser tabs, passwords and history — also sync with Chrome on Android. You can manage those settings on your phone or tablet inside the Chrome app settings.

You'll also see some encryption options, and with those you can choose to use your own sync password, but by default Google encrypts all the data that goes in and out of your account. There's also a handy link to see your web activity, where you can manage your browsing and search history online.

A quick "one more thing" protip — when you install Chrome on a new computer, or sign into a new Chromebook, leave the defaults set for the first sync. This way you won't have to manually install any apps or extensions or themes from the Chrome store. Once everything is set up, you can change the settings and uninstall the things you don't want through the Settings > Extensions page. When you choose what to sync on one device, it won;t delete anything from any of the others — but it will if you leave the "Sync everything" option enabled.

Updated December 2017 with instructions for the latest version of Chrome.

Chromebooks

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How to unlock your Chromebook using your Android phone with Smart Lock

15

While the idea that Android is the key to the future is debatable, it can easily be a key to your Chromebook.

Here is a cool Chromebook feature some of us didn't know about: you can use the Smart Lock feature on your Android phone to enable Smart Lock on your Chromebook! Once set up, as long as your phone is in Bluetooth range, instead of needing to use your password to unlock your Chromebook you can click an icon to sign in via your phone's credentials. The feature has been around for a while, but it's really improved and even looks nice in a Google Material way.

A few caveats apply: your phone has to be fully booted, and both the phone and the Chromebook have to be connected to the internet so they can communicate through your Google account. If those two conditions are met, it works reliably and makes things more convenient. Of course, Smart Lock isn't the most secure way to lock your Chromebook (or your phone) but offering something that's fairly secure and easy to use is the best way to get folks to lock their devices.

Let's see how to set it up.

  • Make sure your Chromebook and your Android phone are turned on, signed into the same Google account, unlocked, connected to the internet, and that Bluetooth is enabled on both devices. If you haven't set up Smart Lock for your Android phone, you'll need to do that first. Any of the methods will work. (Also, make sure only one Chromebook and one phone are turned on in Bluetooth range of each.)
  • Open your Chromebook's settings and find the People section.
  • Click ScreenLock, then enter your password to confirm you really are you.
  • Click Set up next to the entry that says Smart Lock for Chromebook.
  • Your Chromebook will scan for available Bluetooth devices, and when it finds your Android phone you'll see it listed with a button to use it. Go ahead and click it.
  • On your phone, you'll see a notification that it was found. Open the notification (nothing will appear) to allow the Chromebook and phone to pair with each other over Bluetooth. Then move back to the Chromebook as suggested.
  • A few seconds later you'll see that everything is setup and you're ready to give it a try. Click the button to check it out, and your Chromebook is locked and you can click or tap anywhere on your account picture or click the lock icon to sign in.

Instantly, you'll get an email to your Google account address that lets you know your account has a new device using the Smart Lock feature. If you use a recovery address (and you really should) that address will also get an email. This email tells you which account was used, and which two devices are set up to pass Smart Lock credentials to each other. There's also a link there if you didn't do this yourself and something fishy is afoot.

We'll use device security when it's this easy. That's a win all around.

Smart Lock works with multiple Google accounts, too. As long as all the accounts are signed in on the same phone, your Chromebook can sign in using Smart Lock. For managed accounts (like Google Apps or Google Education accounts) the administrator might have to enable it, depending on the policies in effect.

The same inherent security issues with Smart Lock for your phone apply here. This isn't nearly as safe as signing in manually each time you unlock your Chromebook's screen. And if someone swipes your phone and your Chromebook, they have one more avenue to try and break into your account. If you ever lose your phone or your Chromebook, you should change your Google account password right away. While not bulletproof on the security front, Smart Lock is miles better than not locking your Chromebook at all. Since it's this easy to set up and use, people like us will do it. That's a win for security.

Updated December 2017: Added instructions for the latest version of Chrome.

Chromebooks

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Action Launcher: Everything you need to know!

22
Action Launcher is magic

Action Launcher is proof that you really can have it all.

Some launchers are made to be quick. Some launchers are made to be adaptable. Some launchers are made to be smart. Then there are some launchers that try to do it all, and they usually fail. Action Launcher, however, is the rare instance of a home screen launcher that is as quick as it is cunning, and white it does have limits, there's no doubt that Action is one of the best launchers you could come home to.

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How to recover a Chromebook over USB

1

Chromebooks are generally easy, but sometimes you need to bring out the big guns to fix a problem. This is how to recovery a broken Chromebook.

Chromebooks are the easiest-to-use laptops out there, but even the best designed system can be susceptible to failure. In this case, it may be necessary to recover your Chromebook.

Fortunately, it's an easy process. To get started, you'll need the Chrome browser — or another Chrome OS device — and the Chromebook Recovery Utility extension installed. You'll also need a spare USB drive that you've already backed up, since using that drive for the recovery media will wipe and files that are already there. If you have a newer Chromebook that only has USB-C ports, make sure to have a USB-C flash drive or the appropriate adapters.

How to recover your Chromebook

  1. Plug the USB drive into your second machine. On your second machine, open the Chromebook Recovery Utility. Select "Get Started," then select the manufacturer and model of your Chrome device. You may also enter the model number, which would be printed on the bottom of the device. Click "Continue."

  2. Select the USB drive you'd like to use to create the recovery media. Pay super close attention to which flash drive you select, since everything on that drive will be erased. The recovery image for your Chrome device will be downloaded and installed to the USB drive.

  3. Once the flash drive is ready to go, enter recovery mode on your device. On a Chromebook, this is done by turning the device all the way off, holding the Esc and Refresh (the circular arrow) keys then pressing the power button. On a Chromebox, there will be a specific hole on the device that has the recovery button inside. Stick a paperclip or similar object inside to hold down the recovery button, then press the power button.
  4. Your device will prompt you to insert the recovery media into one of the USB ports. Once it recognizes the recovery media, the device will start recovering. Don't fret if your device doesn't recognize the recovery media right away. If you're using a USB-A to USB-C adapter, try a different adapter or a USB-C flash drive. If you're using a Chromebox, you may need to use an SD card as recovery media instead.

Once the device comes back on, it will be just like if you purchased it new or Powerwashed it. Sign into the device with your Google account, and you're all done!

If you need to re-use the USB drive you recovered your Chrome device with, simply open the recovery utility again, click the settings gear in the upper right, then select "Erase recovery media."

Have you ever had to recover a Chrome device? Let us know down below!

Chromebooks

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How to use Instant Tethering with your Chromebook

9

Instant Tethering is a feature designed to enable to the clunkiness of signing into a portable hotspot. Here's how to set it up!

Public WiFi is pretty common at this point, though it's usually slow and insecure. Because of this, many users will instead tether their laptops and tablets to their phone's cellular connection to connect to the web. Creating a portable hotspot has its own issues, include a clunky setup and connection process.

Chrome's Instant Tethering feature has come to alleviate the clunky connection process at least. It's also restricted to those who are using a Chromebook and one of Google's Pixel smartphones, so most Android users can't use the feature at this time. Having said that, let's get into setting up Instant Tethering.

  1. Pair your Chromebook and Pixel phone with each other with Bluetooth.

  2. On your phone, open the Settings app and tap Google Services & preferences.

  3. Scroll down and tap on Instant Tethering.

  4. Make sure the Provide data connection option is enabed.

  5. On your Chromebook, click on your photo in the lower right corner, then click network settings. Enable Mobile Data.

  6. You will get a notification on your phone to verify the connection to your Chromebook. Tap on the notification and tap Connect.

That's not quite as easy as setting up a traditional hotspot, but the payoff comes when you need to connect your Chromebook to your phone again. Simply unlock your Chromebook, and you'll see a notification asking if you'd like to connect to the phone's hotspot. Tap "Connect", and that's it! You're online and ready to go!

Do you use Instant Tethering on your Chromebook? Let us know down below!

Chromebooks

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How to get free mobile hotspot from your Android phone

19

Certain carriers prevent customers from using the mobile hotspot feature, but this guide may help get around that restriction.

While most carriers now offer some sort of unlimited plan, but most of these have some restrictions (which is the textbook definition of irony, but I digress). The most common restriction is tethering data: while users can use their data on their phones for whatever they desire, using that same data bucket while connected to computer is either not allowed, or has limits.

There are features in Android that let carriers check if a user has paid for tethering or mobile hotspot — different carriers use those terms interchangeably — and disable the feature if the user doesn't have the feature on their plan.

There are some ways around this. Certain applications in the Play Store claim to help users bypass the carrier restrictions, and use their data however they intend. In our test case, we're evaluating applications while using a Pixel 2 XL and Cricket Wireless's Unlimited plan without official tethering.

EasyTether Full for Windows, macOS and Android tablets

EasyTether Full allows users to tether their laptop, desktop or tablet over USB or Bluetooth in order to share mobile data with the second device. Before trying to share data for the first time, users will need to download the necessary drivers or tablet-side application.

The drivers and tablet application can be downloaded to the phone application and moved over via USB cord. Unfortunately, the tablet-side application does not allow data to be shared with a Chromebook, and ChromeOS does not allow for drivers to be installed by the user. Because of this, EasyTether will not work for Chromebook users.

Magisk manager for Chrome OS and everything else — Root required

Covering 98% of all users makes EasyTether simple to recommend, but there are some situations where it wouldn't be sufficient. Besides not being available to ChromeOS users, EasyTether also wouldn't work for users who want to connect a game console to their mobile data, or for anyone who needs to connect more than one device at once.

In these cases, the only working solution we found was to root the phone and install Magisk Manager. Within Magisk Manager, navigate to the package installer and scroll down to the package titled "Tethering Enabler." Press the down arrow within that block to download the package, and it will install. Once this is done, reboot your device, and you'll be able to use the hotspot feature as normal.

Other options

It seems like a bit of a cop out, but the best option may be a different plan or carrier. Writing this guide made me finally try MetroPCS after using Cricket for about two years, and I'm glad I tried them. T-Mobile — which owns MetroPCS — has much better coverage in Indianapolis, with my phone working perfectly in areas that were previous dead spots.

Another solution would be using a different phone

I was hesitant to try MetroPCS in my rural hometown, but I found out that T-Mobile has expanded their coverage there as well. It's not good by any definition of the word, but I can make phone calls, get text and instant messages and stream music (but not video). That's much more than I could say the last time I tried to use T-Mobile's service in my hometown. MetroPCS has an unlimited plan with tethering for the same price as my current Cricket plan, and I will be moving my personal line over soon.

Another solution would be using a different phone. I spent the better part of 2017 using the OnePlus 3T. One of the most handy features (for me) of Oxygen OS is that it doesn't have the hooks the carriers use to check if a user has paid for the tethering feature. Because of this, tethering just works whenever the user turns it on, regardless of whether the user has paid for tethering or not.

I also tried other applications from the Play Store that may or may not work. Some users on other carriers and with other phones have had success, but I did not. All of these applications have free tiers though, so they're worth a shot:

Did any of these methods work for you? Let us know down below!

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Setting up a kid-friendly Android device

9

Be involved in your child's digital life.

While handing your phone or tablet off to a child can offer a moment of peace while they are distracted by a game or video, there's a lot more to the experiences children can have in Android. Choosing the right device for them to enjoy is only part of the process, though. Android is primarily made for adults, so there's a little bit of setup necessary to make your average smartphone or tablet child-friendly.

Here's a quick tour through those steps, and some tips on keeping your child safe through Android.

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How do I know if my phone is unlocked?

4

An unlocked phone is the key to getting service from an alternative carrier.

We talk a lot about using MVNO carriers as a way to find a cheaper alternative for service. It's something that's gaining popularity and while it isn't exactly mainstream just yet, it's getting there. We think that's great because having even more choices can't be a bad thing. But in most cases, before you can try any other service provider, you'll need to have a SIM-unlocked phone. That means you can use a SIM card from any company and as long as the hardware is compatible with the network, it just works.

While some of us already know if our phones are unlocked or how to check, here's what you need to know if you are looking for a little help.

More: Best Unlocked Phone

Where did you buy it, and how?

In the U.S., Verizon is the only carrier who is consistent with selling all their smartphones unlocked. What we mean here is that if you walk into a Verizon store or use their website and buy a phone made for Verizon with their name on it, it's probably going to be SIM unlocked. Note that this doesn't mean you should buy a Verizon branded phone to use on a different network because SIM unlocked doesn't mean fully compatible. Just that Verizon is OK with you putting another SIM in the phone and letting the hardware try to connect to a different network.

The other three networks, as well as Best Buy or other third-party carrier resellers, are not as reliable when it comes to selling unlocked phones. Some are, some aren't — but every one of them can be unlocked, because that's the law.

If you bought your phone from Amazon or B&H or another online retailer, it told you in the listing if it was unlocked. If you don't remember, a quick call or email to customer service will help you find a copy of the listing to double check. Of course, if you bought your phone directly from the manufacturer, if it was listed as unlocked it will be and there is no need to check. All phones sold directly from Google and Apple (if paid in full at time of purchase) are unlocked, and many phones from other manufacturers are sold directly and SIM unlocked, too.

For the rest of the phones out there, there's really only one fool-proof way to check — try it.

Use a SIM card from a different carrier

You'll see references to the website imei.info that claim you can check online. While that might be true, the service costs money and has been incorrect five out of five times I have tried. I'll come right out and say it — don't bother.

You can call your carrier or the carrier or MVNO you're thinking of switching to. There is a database of IMEI numbers and it says which phones are unlocked or blacklisted. You might not have any luck here, though, because the person answering the phone might not be able to give you that information. Either because they don't have access to it or they aren't allowed to tell you over the phone. It's worth a try if you don't have access to a SIM card from a different company, though.

If you do have access to a SIM card from a different carrier, checking is pretty simple.

  • Make a phone call using the right SIM card if possible. This is to check that the phone is working properly. Call your mom and tell her hello; she'll appreciate it.
  • Shut off the phone and remove the SIM card. Look in the manual or online if you're not sure how to do this, and if you need a SIM card removal tool, a paperclip works fine.
  • Put the different SIM card in the phone and power it back on.
  • If you're greeted with a dialog box telling you to enter an unlock code, your phone is SIM locked to the carrier it was originally purchased from.
  • If you don't see this, check that it says you have service. If you do, your phone is probably unlocked. Try making another phone call. Mom won't mind two calls on the same day.

If you can't call using the different SIM card, you'll probably get a recorded message with some error code. you can jot down the code and check online to see why the call can't be completed so you know if it's because of a SIM lock or because of incompatible hardware.

If your phone is SIM-locked, don't fret. As mentioned, a carrier has to unlock a phone unless you owe money on it according to U.S. law. Give them a call and they will help you.

When you don't need a SIM-unlocked phone

At the top of this article, we said in most cases you do need a SIM-unlocked phone to try another carrier. That's true, but there is one popular use-case where it doesn't matter: using a T-Mobile branded phone on an MVNO using T-Mobile's network.

T-Mobile actively assists resellers, and they don't require a reseller (that's what an MVNO is) to require you to have an unlocked phone to connect. If your phone says T-Mobile on it or on the box, it will work on most MVNOs that use T-Mobile's network. [And there are a lot of them](/Complete List of T-Mobile MVNOs).



Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How to get the latest version of Android 8.1 Oreo on your Pixel or Nexus

22

Get the latest version of Android on your phone on your own terms.

Now that we're well in the swing with Android Oreo, Pixel and Nexus owners are clamoring to get the latest updates to Android 8.1 as soon as possible. But Google doesn't always push these over-the-air updates as soon as people would like, which is where this guide comes in. Using the tips below, you can sign up for the Android beta program, sideload factory images, or OTA updates to your Nexus or Pixel device as soon as they are available.

These phones aren't just bought by developers. If there's a single reason for consumers to buy a Pixel or keep using a Nexus device, it's this: the newest software first. Period.

The easiest way

If you don't want to mess with unlocking your bootloader or the command line, you will get an update to Android 8.1 if you're part of the Android Beta program. That means that if you have one of the eligible devices, you can simply visit the Android Beta portal and opt-in to the beta, which will then prompt Google to send your phone or tablet an over-the-air update. If you're already in the public beta, you will receive an over-the-air update to the final version of Android 8.1 Oreo shortly.

  1. Head to Android Beta program portal on your Pixel or Nexus phone or tablet.
  2. Sign into the Google account associated with that phone.
  3. Scroll down to Your eligible devices.
  4. Find the device you want to enrol in the Beta program and tap Enrol device.
  5. Follow the prompts to accept the over-the-air download.

Note: To leave the beta program, simply press the button on the Android Beta program page to unenroll. Your phone will receive an over-the-air update to return to the stable version of Android 8.0 Oreo, but your phone will be wiped clean upon rebooting, so back up your stuff.

Which devices are eligible for the Android beta program?

The preview is supported on the following phones and tablets:

  • Pixel 2
  • Pixel 2 XL
  • Pixel
  • Pixel XL
  • Pixel C
  • Nexus 6P
  • Nexus 5X

If you can't wait

If you simply can't wait for the Android beta, flashing the new version of Android is going to be your best bet.

But before we go into the steps of sideloading Android updates, it is strongly recommended that you have previous knowledge of working with the Android SDK (software development kit) and Terminal (OS X or Linux) or Command Prompt (Windows), as it is possible to harm your device if something were to go wrong in the following process.

If you need to download the Android SDK you can grab it from the Android Development website and follow their instructions on how to install it correctly. For the following process, all you will need is the adb and fastboot files which are located in the Platform Tools folder.

Additionally, all the following commands are written as they would be in Terminal on a Linux or OS X platform. If you are following this guide and using a Windows machine, you will not need to use the "./" seen in the guide.

Enable developer settings and USB debugging

  1. Go to your Settings and scroll down to About Phone/Tablet
  2. Tap on the Build number seven times until the dialog box says you are now a developer
  3. Go back to the Settings menu and you should find a new option called Developer options. Click into the Developer options
  4. Make sure that the developer options are turned on and that USB debugging is checked on
  5. If you're upgrading a device running Lollipop or higher, make sure Enable OEM unlock is checked
  6. Plug your device into your computer and click "OK" on the dialog box asking you to Allow USB debugging while connected to the computer. You can also select to always allow access on that computer

If done correctly, this will be everything you will need to do on your phone or tablet for the moment.

Unlocking your bootloader

Nexus devices and Pixel phones bought from Google directly have a bootloader you can unlock. If you want to manually flash software, you'll need to do this.

To do this you must first boot into your bootloader. You can either manually turn off your phone or tablet and hold down the power button and the volume down button to enter your device's Bootloader Menu or you can enter the following commands into your terminal or command prompt.

Run the following command to make sure your device is properly connected to your computer. If it returns a string of characters it means that you are all set to start updating your device.

./adb devices

Now to enter into the Bootloader menu just run the following command.

./adb reboot bootloader

At the bottom of the screen, there will be several things listed including the lock state of the device. This should say locked unless you have unlocked your bootloader in the past and never went back and locked it again.

To unlock your bootloader, which is required only when flashing a stock firmware image (not sideloading and update, which we'll get to soon), you must enter the following commands. Remember that when unlocking your Nexus' bootloader it will factory reset your device, so you will lose everything stored on it. If you have not yet backed up anything important on your device you can hit the power button while Start is highlighted in the Bootloader menu and this will boot you back into your device like normal. Now back to unlocking your bootloader.

On older devices (pre-Marshmallow), you used:

./fastboot oem unlock

On newer devices you'll use:

./fastboot flashing unlock

A dialog will appear on the device asking if you are sure about unlocking. Again this will factory reset your device, so if you want to back out of the process you just need to select no with the power button. If you are ready to unlock your bootloader you press the volume up button and then the power button to confirm that you wish to unlock your bootloader.

./fastboot reboot-bootloader

It is recommended to reboot the bootloader just to give itself a check to make sure everything is working correctly before moving onto the next step.

Flashing the stock firmware image

Now that your bootloader is unlocked, it's time to flash the new firmware. To find the system images, head on over to the Factory Images page, find your device, and download the latest factory image available. It is easiest to then uncompress the file in the Platform Tools folder where the adb and fastboot files are so that you don't have to type the path to the different files when flashing the firmware. (Or if you know that you can drag a file into a terminal window to copy the path, just do that.)

To begin, make sure you are still in the bootloader menu on your device and double check that your bootloader is in fact unlocked.

First, make sure that your computer is communicating correctly with your phone or tablet. As long as your device's serial number comes back as a connected device you are ready to begin updating your device.

./fastboot devices

Now it is time to flash the updated bootloader with the following command.

./fastboot flash bootloader [bootloader file].img

You will not see anything on the screen of your device but there should be a dialog in your terminal or command prompt. When it is done flashing the bootloader you should reboot back into the bootloader as to make sure everything is still working correctly.

./fastboot reboot-bootloader

Next you flash the updated radios. This step is only necessary if you are updating the firmware of a phone or tablet that has cellular radios built into it.

./fastboot flash radio [radio file].img

./fastboot reboot-bootloader

Finally, it's time to flash the actual system image to your phone or tablet.

Warning: The following line of code will wipe your device. If you do **not* want your device to be wiped, remove the "-w" from the command. The update should still take just fine, and it will not wipe your user data.

./fastboot -w update [image file].zip

When this is done, your phone will restart itself and boot up normally. As this process clears all data from your device, it will take slightly longer for your device to boot up for the first time. Once you have been greeted with the device setup walkthrough process, you know you have successfully flashed a new version of the firmware.

If you do not want to enter the commands manually there are scripts included inside the compressed folder containing the system image that will do most but not all of the heavy lifting for you. The flash-all script files will automate the flashing of the bootloader, radios (if needed), and the system image. The problem with this process is that you must first make sure that your phone is in the bootloader menu and its bootloader must be unlocked before starting the script. Of course, if these are not already done the script will fail to run and nothing will happen.

Flashing an OTA update image

If you don't want to unlock your bootloader, you can sideload an OTA update. That is, you're going to download to a computer the update file your phone normally would grab itself over the air (thus OTA), and then push it over via the command line.

It used to be that we'd have to hunt for the OTA file location when a phone would download it, and use that to pull the file from Google's servers. And we can still do that if we want ... but Google now provides OTA images for download. (You can find them here). This is a smaller file that just brings you from the previous version to the latest version — it isn't a complete operating system that could be loaded onto a phone fresh.

Just as is the case with the factory image update, put the OTA file in the Platform Tools directory to simplify the process of sending the file to your phone.

First, make sure that your computer is communicating correctly with your phone or tablet. As long as your device's serial number comes back as a connected device you are ready to begin updating your device.

./adb devices

Next, put your device into the bootloader menu by either the following command or by holding down the power button and the volume down button while it is turned off.

./adb reboot bootloader

Now use the volume down button twice until you have scrolled to Recovery mode, and press the power button to select it. It will look like your phone is restarting itself but an image of an Android with a red exclamation mark over it will appear. Next hold down the power button and press the volume up button, and you will be in recovery mode.

Now that you are in the Android system recovery, use the volume down button to highlight apply update from ADB and press the power button to select it. The text on your Nexus' screen will now say that you can send the OTA to the device using adb.

./adb sideload [OTA file].zip

In your terminal or command prompt you will see a dialog that shows you the progress of transferring the update to your phone or tablet and once it has been completely transferred you can read what is happening with the update live on screen. Again, once the process is done your phone will restart itself and attempt to boot normally. You have successfully updated!

Getting the newest software updates on your Nexus or Pixel is easy to do but understandably difficult the first time. Once you've gone through this process several times it will become second nature to you, so don't be discouraged. Luckily Nexus devices are extremely easy to get back into working order if something gets installed wrong or flashed incorrectly — so don't be alarmed if you've pressed the wrong button.

If you have any trouble along the way, be sure to hop into the forums and ask for help!

Update, December 2017: This post was updated with current links and references to Android 8.1 Oreo.

Android Oreo

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
Show More Headlines

Pages