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2 months ago

Ace the Project Management Professional (PMP) exam with this certification prep course, now just $49.99

Whether you are looking to start a new career or just advance the one you are in currently, you'll need some certifications under your belt to make you stand out above the others. Unfortunately, getting certifications can be a time consuming and expensive process. You need time to study, money to pay for the courses, and then you just have to hope that you can keep up with that and your regular job. Well, it doesn't have to be that way.

Master Project Management for less! Learn More

How does lifetime access to more than 76 courses that contain just shy of 40 hours of training sound? Well, with this awesome certification training package you can work towards becoming certified in one of the industry's most respected certification organizations. You'll be able to access the material 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, so you can do things on your schedule, and this will also help you meet that 35 contact-hour requirement for the exam and certification.

For just $50 you'll have access to:

  • Get lifetime access to 76+ courses & 35+ hours of training
  • Become certified by one of the industry's most respected & in-demand certification organizations
  • Take lessons from a company that's approved by Project Management Institute® to meet the strict educational criteria necessary to earn the PMP® & CAPM®certifications
  • Access the material 24/7 so you can learn when you have time
  • Meet the 35 contact-hour requirement for the PMP® exam & certification
  • Maintain your certification by meeting the required Professional Development Units

Normally, this certification training would set you back nearly $1,500, but if you act quick you can pay just a small fraction of that. What better way to work towards you new goal than on your own schedule, right?

Save big for a limited time! Learn More

Don't miss out on this huge 96% savings because this deal won't last forever. Make the purchase now, and thank yourself later.

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2 months ago

How to set up Google Photos

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Never lose a photo again, once you've set up Google Photos.

Having access to all of your photos at a swipe is kind of like living the dream, at least for many photographers it is. If you're snap-happy, then you owe it to yourself to make sure that you never lose another photo again with Google Photos. This service will back up, store, and organize your photos so that as soon as you capture that moment it's protected from accidental deletion when your phone runs out of storage space. Getting everything set up is a quick process, provided you already have a Google account, and in many cases comes preloaded on your phone.

Why use Google Photos?

While we may think of our phones as a repository for our entire lives, they have finite storage space. When you broach that limit, having your photos backed up means that you can delete them off of your phone without losing them entirely. Likewise, if your phone suffers a tragic fall, or swim in the pool, and doesn't survive, your photos will.

By saving and uploading your photos to a personal cloud, you can share them and access them from whatever device you like. For parents especially this service becomes invaluable in ensuring that you get to keep every memory in technicolor.

Step by step instructions for setting up Google Photos

  1. Open Google Photos.
  2. Sign in to your Google account.
  3. Choose desired quality setting.

  4. Wait for your Photos to sync, and get started!

Step by step instructions for choosing device folders

  1. Open Google Photos
  2. Tap the overflow icon that looks like 3 lines in the upper left corner of your screen
  3. Tap the gear icon to open Settings

  4. Tap the first option, Back up and sync
  5. Tap Back up device folders
  6. Tap the toggle to choose which folders are backed up to Google Photos

Step by step instructions for choosing image upgrade quality

When setting up your Google Photos account, you also have a choice in your image upload quality. There are two options open to you, high quality, or original quality. Choosing high quality will score you unlimited storage, with photos stored at 16MP and videos stored at 1080p. Choosing original quality will count against your Google account storage, but all photos and videos are stored at the quality you shot them — including RAW files. This especially handy if you're shooting in resolutions higher than 16MP, or in RAW.

It's also worth noting that Pixel users get free storage of all photos and videos in original quality, without it counting against your Google account storage.

Choose your image quality while setting up Google Photos

  1. Open Google Photos.
  2. Follow the directions to set up an account.
  3. When the Back up and sync page appears tap on change settings.
  4. Choose between original and high quality for your uploads.

Change your image quality in the settings

  1. Open Google Photos.
  2. Tap on the overflow icon that looks like 3 horizontal lines in the upper left corner.
  3. Tap on Settings

  4. Tap on Back up and sync.
  5. Tap on Upload size.
  6. Choose your image quality to upload.

Do you use Google Photos to save all of the shots on your camera roll? Is there a part of setting up Google Photos that we missed? Do you still have questions about getting Google Photos set up and ready to go? Be sure to drop us a comment below and let us know all about it!

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2 months ago

Best Chrome extensions you didn't know about but should be using

109
10 Chrome extensions you didn't know existed but should be using

What are the best Chrome extensions I should be using?

Update 24 March 2017: We've refreshed this list to ensure you're kept up to the latest when it comes to the best Chrome extensions you should be using.

The amount of time most people spend browsing the internet continues to rise each year, and Google's Chrome browser attempts to be the most comfortable and versatile browser out there. To aid in its quest, Google allows for developers to market small software extensions that modify and (in most cases) ameliorate your browsing experience. Here are 10 Chrome extensions you didn't know about but should be using.

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2 months ago

1Password gives an early look at one of Android O's best features

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Android O is bringing a new way for password managers and other apps to autofill information. Here's how it works.

Whenever Google introduces a new version of Android, there's always a silent disclaimer to go along with it: few of these features will be available until developers add them to their apps. Well, one developer hasn't wasted much time showing what its implementation of one major O feature will look like: AgileBits, Toronto-based creator of popular password manager, 1Password, has uploaded a proof-of-concept showing off the new Autofill API.

Video Playerhttps://blog.agilebits.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/autofill-demo.mp400:0500:0000:16Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.

From 1Password's blog:

As you can see in the video, after navigating to the login page in the Twitter app, the Autofill Framework notified 1Password that there were some fields that could be filled. 1Password then responded by letting the Autofill Framework know it recognized those fields as a login form, but that it needed to be unlocked first. I was then prompted to unlock 1Password if I wanted to continue.

After I unlocked 1Password with my fingerprint, my example Twitter credentials were displayed in a dropdown provided by the Autofill Framework and automatically filled when I tapped on them.

It really does seem that simple, and I'm grateful, because auto-filling is one of the best features in 1Password today, but it relies on an accessibility hack that most people won't be willing to go through. Once O is released (and widely-available, natch) such a feature will be a breeze to activate.

Everything you need to know about Android O

Android O

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3 months ago

Facebook is testing out animated GIFs for comments in its Android app

9

The social network finally gives in to what the people really want.

The GIF is alive and well, folks, and it appears Facebook has finally caught on to its ubiquity. The social network is officially exploring its relationship with these animated images. It will soon begin testing the ability to add GIFs to comments in your feed.

In an email to TechCrunch, a Facebook spokesperson confirmed the addition of animated GIFs:

Everyone loves a good GIF and we know that people want to be able to use them in comments. So we're about to start testing the ability to add GIFs to comments and we'll share more when we can, but for now we repeat that this is just a test.

Those of you with poor internet connections or slower computers, you don't have to worry too much. Facebook won't allow embedded GIFs in the main feel; they'll be ostensibly limited to use as reactions to main posts. The company wants to avoid the images become distractive, or disruptive to the main news feed.

But at the same time, the ability to comment on posts with an animated GIF should have been implemented a while ago. Most mainstream messaging apps and services already support animated GIFs, and I bet you can't go a few hours without someone dropping in an animated Imgur link. The GIF has no plans of leaving the internet anytime soon.

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3 months ago

You should probably start looking for an alternative to Hangouts

96

The dream of mobile messaging without SMS is dead. At least, for now.

Hangouts is dropping SMS support on May 22, according to an email sent to G Suite administrators. Starting March 27, Hangouts users will get a message explaining the change so there's time to choose a new app. Weirdly, Google is trying to frame this feature removal as an improvement.

Last year, we announced several improvements to the most popular features of Google Hangouts, such as the new video meetings experience and better group chat messaging. As a part of that ongoing effort, we will be removing carrier SMS text messaging from Hangouts on Android after May 22, 2017.

The email continues on to explain that Google Voice users will not be affected by this change, which in turn means Project Fi users are also clear to continue using Hangouts for now, but honestly why bother? It's not hard to see where this is going.

Perhaps most important, this change and its future consequences makes it clear Google isn't pursuing a world where it is the universal identifier anymore.

Google wants Hangouts Meet and Hangouts Chat to be the video and messaging services for G Suite (business) customers, and for Allo and Duo to be what consumers use. It has been made clear that Google is going to stop anyone from using Hangouts — at least for now — but it couldn't be more clear that Hangouts isn't going to be an included app in Android for much longer.

That means the people using Hangouts simply because it's there aren't going to go looking for it to install it, which means the number of people that aren't Android nerds available to you on Hangouts is going to drop rapidly. I give it a year tops after that change until it's easier to find people on Facebook Messenger than Hangouts, which isn't great for several reasons.

I'm not using this, and you can't make me.

Perhaps most important, this change and its future consequences makes it clear Google isn't pursuing a world where it is the universal identifier anymore. Hangouts was convenient because every Android user has a Google account, which meant the Gmail address offered multiple ways to quickly communicate with people. As Google shifts to messaging services that are only linked by phone numbers and fewer services that identify by email, the ubiquity of a Google account has the potential to rapidly lose its significance to those all in on the ecosystem this company has created.

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3 months ago

How to share photos from Google Photos

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Sharing photos is easy whether you want to upload to Facebook or just share with one person.

Google Photos is a great way to store your photos and ensure that you never accidentally delete something that holds value to you. But as we all know, half of the fun of photos in the social media age is the ability to easily share them. Thankfully, Google makes things really easy to share your best photos on Instagram, or just your best friends hassle-free. We've got all the details for you here.

Share photos to friends and social media

The easiest way to share our photos with the world is by posting them to social media. This lets your friends and family discover them on their own time whenever they check their feeds. This method allows you to share a single photo with specific friends, or directly to social media. It's simple, it's easy, and it will let you have complete control over who sees your photo.

  1. Open Google Photos
  2. Tap on the photo that you want to share
  3. Tap the share icon at the bottom left of your screen.
  4. Tap on the icon for your social media of choice, or choose a person to send the photo to

Share an album

There are times that sharing a single photo just isn't going to cut it. Whether you want to share snaps from your latest adventure or photos from a recent party, sharing an album may be the most convenient way to go about it. You get some more options when you share an album, and retain control over who can see it at all. This option may be the best idea for folks who have a dozen or more photos to share, or who want to allow friends to add more photos to the album through collaborative features.

  1. Open Google Photos
  2. Tap the album icon in the bottom right corner
  3. Tap on the album you would like to share.

  4. Tap the overflow icon in the upper right corner, it looks like 3 vertical dots.
  5. Adjust the album sharing options and copy the link
  6. Send the share link to those you want to share this album with.

Check to see what you've shared

In some cases you might want to double check who you have shared a specific album or photo with and Google has you covered. In the album section of the app, you'll find an area called 'Shared'. Within it are the albums and photos you have shared, along with whom you have shared those photos with. This is an easy way to check whether you've shared a specific photo before, and ensure you've shared it with all of the appropriate people.

  1. Open Google Photos
  2. Tap the album icon in the bottom right corner
  3. Tap on Shared
  4. Double check on shared content

Sharing made simple

Google Photos delivers tons of great options when it comes to sharing the moments that matter to you. It doesn't matter whether you want to share them with just one person, a select group, or everyone following you on Instagram, Google has you covered. You can share, adjust settings, and even see who you shared past photos and albums with all from within the Google Photos app.

Are you a fan of sharing using Google Photos? Be sure to drop us a line below and tell us about it!

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3 months ago

Android O: Everything you need to know

45

You have questions about Android O and we have answers. Here's the skinny on what you need to know about Google's next.

Android O is upon us! Well, not really. But the second developer preview, and the first public beta, have been released and we're starting to uncover what Google has been doing with Android for the past year and what to expect when it's released.

Google says to expect the full version in late summer 2017 (and a Pixel 2 with some even newer features in October). For now, though, there's a beta that you can easily install.

Until the final release, we'll keep this page updated as the best place to find everything you need to know about Android O!

What's new in Android O

We have to start with all the changes under the hood that come with Android O. And we expect plenty of them!

With the first developer preview, we saw some exciting stuff that will have a big impact for developers and the apps they can make. New ways to use custom fonts and icons, a better way to deliver professional-level audio and awesome ways to connect with others for things like head-to-head gaming or local social applications.

The second developer preview added notification badges, support for picture-in-picture, autofill support, smart text selection, and TensorFlow Lite for improved apps with machine learning integration.

What's New in Android O: Everything you need to know

How do I install the Android O beta?

Now that the second Android developer preview is available, Google has launched an official Android O beta. It's really easy to install — you don't need to go through command lines or the Android SDK — by following a brief set of instructions at the link below. It's also pretty easy to opt out if you want to go back to Nougat.

How to get Android O on your Pixel or Nexus right now

Should you install the Android O developer preview?

Probably not.

Even though the second Android O preview is available publicly and easier to install, it's still a beta and is not optimized for consumers. The takeaway after using the second beta is that even though stability is improved over the first developer preview, many important Android O features are not yet enabled, and there are still lots and lots of bugs, especially when using apps that aren't regularly updated.

Should you install Android O developer preview on your Pixel or Nexus?

What devices can install the Android O developer preview?

The Android O developer preview is available for the Pixel, Pixel XL, Nexus 6P, Nexus 5X, Pixel C and Nexus Player.

Remember, that doesn't mean Android O will be released for all of those devices, as we saw the Nexus 5 get developer previews for Android 7 and it was not part of the release. There is a lot of work behind the scenes with licensing and software versioning so just because a device can run the software doesn't mean it will officially see it.

What will Android O eventually be called?

Android O will be called Oreo. Probably.

As of Google I/O, we don't know the official name for Android O, but it's looking increasingly likely that Google will net a deal with Nabisco, the makers of Oreo, the way that it did with Nestle for Android 4.4 KitKat.

Will my phone be updated to Android O?

There's a good chance that if you have a phone that debuted in 2017, your phone will eventually be updated to Android O when it's released. It may not be until 2018, but it will happen. If your phone is from 2016, the chance of it being updated to Android O is less, but some manufacturers — Samsung, Motorola — will be updated.

If you have a Pixel or Pixel XL, or a Nexus 5X or 6P, your phone will be among the first to receive the final version of Android O.

Android O

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3 months ago

Facebook adds reactions and direct mentions to Messenger

4

One step closer towards becoming a robust messaging app; one giant leap towards adopting features typically heralded by Slack users.

First, it was Google Hangouts, and now it's Facebook Messenger. Companies appear to be particularly drawn to those features that have made Slack so popular, but can you blame them? Slack's communication dynamic truly is a deligh to use, and those other companies want people to say the same about their messaging apps.

Facebook has announced it's rolling out two new functionalities to its Messenger app. Reactions will allow you to effectively react to a friend or foe's response the same way you would a regular Facebook post. However, unlike Slack's vast emoji offerings, Facebook limits you to seven, including a very terse thumb down emoji.

Messenger has also adopted Mentions, which seem to work the same way they would on Slack. To mention someone, type the @ symbol before their name to notify them to join the chat. This pings the person with an entirely different notification so they're aware they're wanted in a specific conversation. Of course, if you're just not that into your pals, you could turn off this notification entirely.

The update to Facebook Messenger should be rolling out in the coming days.

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3 months ago

These are the best apps for watching 360-degree videos

These apps deliver awesome videos from all over the world.

VR has already taken us on a pretty crazy ride, from roller coasters in VR to helping with new medical therapies. While the cutting edge stuff is fascinating, sometimes all you want to do is settle in and check out a great video. VR can deliver spectacular sights from places you've never even considered visiting. No matter your fancy, there are hundreds of great apps out there that deliver 360-degree videos to your VR headset of choice. Finding the best ones can be difficult, which is why we've put together this handy list for you!

Read more at VRHeads.com

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3 months ago

Instagram continues to morph itself into more than just another social network

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You're already posting pictures to Instagram and using it to exclusively chat with your pals. You'll soon be able to book your next appointment through it, too.

Ahh, Instagram. It's become one of those bonafide social networks that's really more than it advertises to be. Instagram isn't just a reel of photos your friends are posting from their days out in the sun. It's where you can keep long running group chats with friends where you're sending each other memes, or peruse through your favorite artist pages to buy their original work. Soon, you'll be able to book appointments through it, too.

Per a blogpost written to its advertisers today, Instagram announced it would soon bring a new "Book" option to the Instagram pages of your favorite hair salon, for instance. You'll know how much you're paying for every treatment, as there will be a separate pricing and payment section available.

You can imagine plenty of hair salons, nail salons, and even independent makeup artists using this particular feature as a way to attract more customers. Instagram is already its own advertising platform, after all, a sort of "choose your own adventure" for small business owners. It'll also be particularly convenient when planning your own appointments. There's nothing worse than having to call the salon because their online reservation system is outdated.

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3 months ago

You can now send Android APKs to your friends via Allo

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It's not full-featured SMS support, but the new file sharing features could help tide over Allo users for a little while longer.

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Allo users, I know you're feeling it — any time Google announces a new feature for the nascent chat app, you're jumping around, hoping it's that one feature you've been waiting for a while now.

Unfortunately, today is not that day. There is still no word about the oft-requested SMS integration making its way to Allo, but at least now you can attach documents to your messages. With the latest update, Allo chatters can now send PDFs, Microsoft Word files, compressed files, audio files, and even Android APKs. You can use this feature by tapping the paperclip icon in the menu screen above the message input window. This will launch your device's file explorer.

Google announced in the same blogpost that Brazilian users will also get the Smart Smiley feature in Portuguese, which uses machine learning to pick the most relevant emojis and stickers.

The update will be rolling out to your Android device this week.

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3 months ago

There's so much more to Android O than we know right now

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Android O

You may not be impressed by the first Android O Dev Preview, but don't lose hope.

We've said it time and time again, but it requires reiteration when a new Android Developer Preview is announced: don't judge an entire upcoming Android platform update by its first Developer Preview release. Android O just launched officially in the form of a Developer Preview that can be downloaded and flashed to Pixel or late-model Nexus, and in typical Google fashion what we're seeing here isn't even close to finished yet.

Just like the Android N Developer Preview that kicked off this time last year, the Android O Developer Preview is, in terms of the interface and features you can actually see, basically the same as the Android 7.1.2 Nougat software that Android Beta Program testers just updated to. Even the behind-the-scenes changes in the Developer Preview that really matter to developers are "small," at least by the scale we usually see in Android updates.

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3 months ago

How to use indoor maps in Google Maps

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Easily navigate malls and department stores with indoor maps.

One of the more useful additions to Google Maps is the ability to navigate within malls, museums, libraries, or sports venues. The feature is accessible in 25 countries, and Google maintains a list of prominent locations for which indoor navigation is available.

If you're looking to find the shortest route to a particular store within a mall or navigating a gargantuan museum and are in need of a layout guide, the indoor maps feature comes in handy.

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3 months ago

Google News & Weather now gives you way more headlines, because content

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The app's new motto is "just keep scrolling."

If you're already Googling your news every morning, maybe it's time to consider downloading Google's News & Weather app instead. The app received a feature bump from its maker. You can now peruse through 200 news stories at a time with More Headlines by simply scrolling on and on.

The More Headlines section loads as you scroll, offering a seemingly endless stream of articles. The News & Weather app will prioritize displaying AMP articles since more websites have adopted the format. Google also mentioned that the displayed content in the app will "stay algorithmic," meaning that everything from which articles are shown to the sources chosen will depend on an algorithm churning in the background. The more you use it, the better it gets at finding you news.

The Google News & Weather app is available for both Android and iOS. Quickly, now — this may be your only chance to get an iPhone-loving friend on the Google bandwagon.

The app update will roll out over the next few days.

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