Recent Articles | Android Central

Order Samsung Galaxy S8: AT&T | Verizon | T-Mobile | Sprint | Unlocked

Headlines

4 years ago

Verizon officially gets its Galaxy Note 10.1 on Thursday

6

Just a quick heads up that the Verizon LTE version of the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 that we first told you would be landing on March 7 ... is now officially landing on March 7. It'll be available in stores and online for $599.99.

The Galaxy Note 10.1 showcases Samsung's S Pen, with a number of apps and features designed specifically for it. Samsung showed it off for Big Red back at CES in January.

See our complete Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 review from August 2012.

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

Two more casualities of Twitter's power play

39

TweakDeck dies alongside its master; tablet app from Carbon developer won't be released

We've got a couple more deaths to report in Twitter's ongoing war against anything third-party.

MoDaCo's Paul O'Brien has dropped the news that we all knew was coming -- in the wake of TweetDeck's depreciation, his customized "TweakDeck" will also bite the big one. Writes O'Brien:

So how does this affect TweakDeck, my 'fixed up' TweetDeck client that has nearly half a million downloads in the Play Store? Unfortunately... it too is doomed. Firstly, switching from the TweetDeck credentials internally to my own development credentials is virtually impossible because the application uses XAuth for authentication, which is no longer available to developers. Secondly, it is based on API 1.0 and switching to API 1.1 would be a huge undertaking. Disappointing, but it's out of my hands unfortunately.

Then there's the anticipated "Graphite" tablet app from the developers of the Carbon for Android Twitter app. Developer M.Saleh Esmaeili on Google+ gave word that because of Twitter's practices -- "not even close to predictable on what they have in plans for us third-party client developers," he writes -- Graphite won't be released, nor will a paid version of Carbon.

"I'm drawing a line for myself here," Esmaeili continued. "Carbon for Android is the last app I ever make that is a client for another service, hoping I can keep my word on this."

Twitter has significantly limited newer applications, capping the number of users at 100,000, with no exceptions, as part of this month's API changes.

Sources: MoDaCo; +M.Saleh Esmaeili

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

Win a Nexus 4 charging orb from Android Central's international giveaway

9

We've got four Nexus 4 charging orbs here, and each of them is looking for a loving home. That means it's giveaway time again! We want to give all four of these to someone who can use them, and unlike Google, we're doing it worldwide. We're going to break it up to make sure two of these go to folks who can't order them from Google, so that means some special rules. Read carefully.

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

New Opera for Android browser runs webkit, available now from Google Play

18

The folks at Opera have released their new web browser for Android, dropping the Presto browser engine in favor of webkit, which is also used in Chrome and the AOSP browser. The beta build is available for download from Google Play, and it's got quite the list of features.

There's a new "Discover" panel which sorts popular articles from the web, an all new Speed Dial, Off-Road mode for times when your connection is a bit bad, tabbed browsing, and more.

Keep in mind that this is a beta product, and even Opera notes:

The beta version launched today, the first iteration of the new generation of Opera browsers for smartphones, will give developers and first-movers in the mobile-app world access to Opera's latest offering for Android users.

We'll be taking a closer look at the new browser, in the meantime if you're the adventurous type you can download it at the Google Play link above, and hit the break for a short product video and the full press release.

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

Android 4.2.2 update for Verizon Galaxy Nexus leaks out

36

The leaked build of Android 4.2.2 for the Verizon Galaxy Nexus we first saw over the weekend has just hit the internet courtesy of a member at XDA that has pulled the build directly from a Google OTA server. The update is meant to bring Galaxy Nexus users on big red up from 4.1.1 to 4.2.2 -- build JDQ39 -- directly, with no fancy hoops. As we noted, this is an actual OTA file meant to be applied to stock and unrooted devices. This still doesn't mean the update is finalized or ready for release just yet, but it does give a whole bunch of legitimacy that the update is in its testing phases.

If you're interested in giving this update a go and have your Galaxy Nexus running on stock 4.1.1, you'll need to be rooted with a custom recovery -- or be able to temporarily boot a custom recovery -- to apply the update. If you're unsure on the process to accomplish either of those, head to the forums where we have some fantastic guides to walk you through it.

Verizon Galaxy Nexus Forums

Source: XDA; Via: Droid-Life

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

Verizon exec expects LTE-only phones in 2014, subsidies to decrease over time

25

According to CFO Fran Shammo, Verizon will have LTE-only phones in the market by late 2014 and expects device subsidies to decrease in the next few years. Speaking at the Deutsche Bank 2013 Media, Internet & Telecom Conference, Shammo explained that the move to LTE-only devices in late 2014 will help reduce the cost of smart phones. Presumably if a device doesn't require a CDMA chipset at all the manufacturers will be able to cut costs, but we have to wonder by how much the price could change just by leaving the CDMA chipset out. Further expanding on reducing the cost of smart phones, Shammo said that he expects device subsidies to fall over the next two to three years due to competition between manufacturers.

Presumably lower upfront costs for devices mean smaller subsidies for the carrier to take the burden of, but we doubt those savings will be passed on to consumers. Subsidizing handsets is an expensive proposition for carriers, and any savings they find will be internalized while on-contract prices for consumers will likely stay the same. The rigid pricing model for on-contract phones in the U.S. makes it hard for savings to make it to the end user.

Source: FierceWireless

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

Mobiroo offers unlimited paid app downloads for a flat monthly fee

12

Mobiroo is hoping to hop on the popularity of mobile device subscriptions by offering users access to hundreds of top paid apps at a flat monthly rate. At the promotional price of just $2.49 per month, users will be able to download any paid app in the Mobiroo library, which it claims at this point would cost thousands of dollars if purchased from Google Play. The catalog supposedly has a good spread of top apps from multiple genres, and is continuing to expand. The expected price of the service after the promotional period ends is $5 per month, which still seems like a good value.

What will really matter in the end is if the apps you want are on the service. If they are, you could have a chance to save a lot of money if you'd prefer to keep a flat monthly fee for all of your purchases. It certainly won't work for everyone, but if the app catalog is robust enough it could be interesting. You can see more about Mobiroo and sign up for the service at the source link below.

Source: Mobiroo; PR Newswire

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

Facebook Messenger now offers free voice calling for Android, as long as you're in Canada

5

The Facebook Messenger app for Android was updated today, bringing feee VoIP calling to users in Canada. This mirrors the way things were done on the iOS app, which saw support for folks in the U.S. about two weeks after it debuted in Canada. While there's no guarantee the Android app will follow the same roll-out schedule, we're going to assume that it will cross the border soon.

In addition to the new VoIP calling, the app allows group conversations to be viewed in the sidebar, and allows them to be searched by name and friends. Hit the Google Play link to update.

Via: Cnet

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

Update: 'Leaked' pictures stolen from Expansys mockups

114

Update 2: EVLeaks has deleted its tweets sharing the "leaks."

Update: It appears this stuff comes from a speculative product info page published by online retailer Expansys. So we can probably discount these images.

The Samsung Galaxy S4 may be the most anticipated Android device ever, and our old pals at @evleaks may have just outed the specs and overall design of it. While it's still a render, if true we get to see the more rectangular design of Samsung's next, as well as a comparison against the previous models (see the pic after the break). 

On the specifications front, we're told to expect a Super AMOLED HD screen of an unknown size, 2GB of RAM, a 13MP camera, and storage options of 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB. Of course it will be running on Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean).

As we saw with the Galaxy S3, Samsung isn't afraid to toss out a red herring or three. But evleaks has a very solid track record, so that has to be considered. We see nothing here we wouldn't expect from the next Samsung Galaxy S phone, so we're excited. 

We'll know more in about 10 days.

Source: @evleaks (1); (2)

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

OpenTable joins Google+ Developers Live to discuss Google+ sign-in and over-the-air installs tomorrow

1

 

We all know that Google has rolled out tools for developers to use Google+ sign-in for the web and for Android apps, but something that isn't getting as much attention as it should is the over-the-air app installation that can happen when a developer sets up his or her web app. On the surface it looks like magic -- use Google+ to sign into a web site (like fitbit.com or opentable.com) and during the process you're presented with a screen that will install the mobile app directly to your phone if you would like. It's a new level of app discovery that will drive users (that's us) to the apps we're likely interested in.

This is important. If you're visiting a website and engaged enough to want or need to sign in, chances are you'll want to take a look at the Android app. It makes it easy for users to find the apps, and makes it easy for developers to let us know they're there. The folks at OpenTable realize how important this can be, so they're joining Gus Class and Chris Cartland from Google in a special Google+ Developers Live session tomorrow (March 5) at 2:30pm PST. 

If you're a developer, or even an interested user, this should answer a lot of questions about the over-the-air app install process, as well as discuss the ways it can benefit developers and users alike. You'll find all the information in the Google+ event page listed below.

Google+ Developers Live: Over-the-Air Installs

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

TweetDeck for Android is going the way of the Dodo

17

TweetDeck, which has been owned and operated by Twitter itself since mid 2011, is closing down its Android and iPhone apps to focus on future development of its web app. The app itself hasn't seen an update or redesign in the Play Store since the end of 2011, but other developers have built on top of TweetDeck for much longer. In a post on its official blog, TweetDeck says that it will discontinue support for the apps in May by pulling them from their respective stores, and the apps will stop working short after. Some of the "blame" is put on Twitter's upcoming retirement of the v1.0 API, which the apps rely on, but it's a much bigger story than that.

This shutdown should come as no surprise considering the stagnation in development of the app and Twitter's move to cut down on third party Twitter client development. TweetDeck says as much in its post, where it notes that it has made "an increased investment in Twitter for iPhone and Twitter for Android", and that the combination of a better official Twitter app along with improvements to the TweetDeck web app will improve the experience for users.

Source: TweetDeck

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

CM10.1-m2 based on Android 4.2.2 now available

19

CyanogenMod has just released its latest "M" build, CM10.1-m2 based on Android 4.2.2, for several different devices. The M builds are meant to be a bigger step up in stability from just another nightly build, but not quite ready for the mainstream as a "stable" release. Its for this reason that the CM team encourages bug reports on these builds, which can go a long way towards that stable release. Starting today the CM10.1-m2 builds will be available for several devices, including the Nexus lineup, HTC One X / Evo 4G LTE, Galaxy S / S2 / S3 / Note and a few other odds and ends.

If you're interested in moving up to the latest M build and have one of the above devices, head to the source link below and grab your download. If you don't see your device listed just yet, don't worry. They note that CM10.1 nightly builds will continue for other devices until they hit a level deemed acceptable as an M build.

Source: CyanogenMod

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

Unlocked Sony Xperia ZL headed to the U.S. with LTE and new color option

26

Sony's other 5-incher heads stateside with T-Mobile + AT&T LTE bands and new red color

Good news for American Sony fans with a few hundred dollars to blow on an unlocked smartphone. The Xperia ZL -- the more compact cousin of the Xperia Z -- is landing in the U.S., where it'll be available unlocked from the manufacturer's online store. Like its international counterpart, the ZL packs a 1.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon S4 CPU, a 13MP Exmor RS rear camera and a 5-inch 1080p HD Reality Display screen. The main differences include the unique notification light down below, as well as the smaller chassis size and lack of waterproofing.

Of particular interest is the extra color variant that's cropped up -- a red option with a black front -- and the American ZL's support for LTE Bands 1, 2, 4, 5 and 17 alongside the standard pentaband HSPA. If our calculations are correct, that means it should work on both T-Mobile and AT&T's LTE networks -- T-Mo's in the process of lighting up Band 4, while AT&T has LTE deployed on Band 17. In theory that means you'll have an unlocked handset that can run quite happily on either carrier's 4G LTE -- a unique proposition for the U.S. market. However U.S. carriers being as they are, we'll have to wait until devices begin shipping before we can confirm that everything's working in the real world.

There are no details available on pricing just yet, but previous unlocked Sony handsets haven't come cheap. In any case, there's a sign-up page on the Sony Store where customers can register their interest.

Anyone in the U.S. tempted by the prospect of such an unlocked, LTE-capable Sony phone? Shout out in the comments!

More: Hands-on with the Sony Xperia ZL

Source: Sony Store; via: XperiaBlog

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

Samsung Galaxy S4 to employ 'eye scrolling,' says NYT

27

The Samsung Galaxy S4 launches next Thursday, Mar. 14, and the rumor mill is starting to churn. The latest unofficial reports on Samsung's next Android smartphone comes from the New York Times' 'Bits' blog, which claims to have word of a new scrolling technique used by the handset. Apparently the S4 will use eye-tracking technology to automatically scroll through articles --

"The phone will track a user’s eyes to determine where to scroll, said a Samsung employee who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the news media. For example, when users read articles and their eyes reach the bottom of the page, the software will automatically scroll down to reveal the next paragraphs of text."

It wouldn't be the first time Samsung's used this kind of tech on a smartphone. The Galaxy S3 included "SmartStay," a feature which used the front-facing camera to determine whether the user was looking at the screen and lock it accordingly. There are no specific details about how this eye-scrolling feature might work, but the Times notes Samsung has applied for trademarks of "EyeScroll" and "Samsung EyeScroll" in the EU and U.S. respectively for similar-sounding software features.

To us, this sounds like exactly the sort of feature Samsung might bring to a new smartphone -- recall the wacky "Smart Rotation" feature that debuted on the Note 2 to assist with horizontal reading. However pre-release rumors don't always reveal the full picture, so we'll have to reserve final judgment until we see what Samsung's been building next Thursday.

Source: New York Times

Read more and comment

 
4 years ago

White House, FCC chair agree SIM unlocking should be legal

22

Some good news today in the fight for making it legal to SIM-unlock your phone without having to go through an operator. The White House has swiftly responded to the petition that garnered the support of more than 114,000 people, with a pretty crystal clear subject line -- "It's time to legalize cell phone unlocking."

That's a pretty powerful step in the right direction, but it doesn't actually change anything yet. If you want to (legally) SIM unlock your phone, you still have to go through your operator to get it done. That, in and of itself, is not a bad thing. If your account is in good standing and you've paid off the subsidy on your phone, they should hand over the SIM unlock code with no problem.

There are cases, however, that make things a little more difficult, and that's where this legality issue comes into play.

Read more and comment

 
Show More Headlines

Pages