Everyone has their own style of reading.

Everyone has their own preferences when it comes to reading. Nowhere is this more true than reading on your phone.

Whether you're reading on a 4-inch budget phone or a top-of-the-line phablet, reading on your phone is unique to each and every voracious bookworm that does it. Some will only read on their tablet, some will squeeze in a few pages anywhere they can — and we do mean anywhere. Some will switch apps on a dime — or to save a dime on a particular book — while other are committed to one service and one service alone. But at the end of this week's poll, there can only be one... or can there?

The eReader field is open and diverse, and that's great news for the readers who use them.

As you can see, the readers who responded to this week's poll haven't completely given in to one service or another, but Kindle edged out Google Play Books to take top billing in this week's poll, and that's little surprise considering Kindle is one of the largest platforms, is compatible with almost every platform out there, and even features a subscription model for readers who've been known to knock out a book or two in a sunny afternoon.

What is a surprise is how many responding users said Google Play Books is their primary reading app. Play Books only lost to Kindle by about 150 votes, and that speaks to how far Google Play Books has come. With regular sales on the homepage of the Google Play Store, readers have been able to snag more content at pocket-friendly prices. With both a wealth of both independent authors and big-publisher bestsellers, there's more content to enjoy in Play Books, including the bulk of my own collection: graphic novels.

Next up was Other eReader, which isn't surprising given just how many eReaders out there have a following, like Moon+ Reader, Aldiko, and Overdrive, which were all championed by readers in the comments. Kobo and Nook each had a small following, rounding out the bottom of the poll.

And then we have the purists: sixteen percent of responding users said they do not read on their phone. In the comments, many stated that nothing will ever replace real books, but some also confessed that they spend all day staring at screens and when they want to unwind and read a book, they don't want to do it on yet another screen. And as someone who spends all day reading and writing across several screens, I can certainly understand that position.

So, are you surprised by these results? And what kind of books do you read the most on your devices versus what do you prefer a physical copy of?