Android Central

We're always interested in new ways to use Android in our lives. Recently we've seen washing machines, and home phones bringing Android outside of our smartphones. Philips are taking it a little further and integrating Android into a new Soundbar that uses the OS to stream your content via DLNA. 

The CSS5123 Soundbar is a single speaker, bundled with a companion Subwoofer. The aim is to create a virtual 5.1 surround sound effect with just one speaker. The Android part comes in when the Soundbar uses the programming to connect with any DLNA capable device such as your smartphone, tablet or even your desktop PC using the Philips SimplyShare app. 

The best part is that it doesn't just allow for music streaming to be played direct through the speaker. Via an integrated Smart Media Player, video content can be streamed and played back through your TV. 

Availability is expected in the United States in April, costing $350. 

via Gizmag
More: Philips CSS5123 Soundbar spec sheet

 
There are 11 comments

McPlot says:

So I can view my pictures through the speaker?..

One speaker to simulate 5.1 sound seems rather impossible to me. But I am not an audio engineer.

Though it is one speaker enclosure, it is technically incorrect to call it one speaker. There likely will be a few speakers in the enclosure all tweaked to help the surround effect.

I had a Vizio sound bar that lightning killed, so I took it apart to see how it worked. It had 5 speakers. One in the center pointed directly at me. Two on the far edges pointed more or less towards my shoulders. And two others pointed outwards, as if to rebound the sound off the walls. I don't know how all this combines to create a surround effect as I'm also not an audio engineer, but I assume all sound bars would need a setup similar to this arrangement to replicate a surround sound.

I will say, that before the lightning killed it, the sound bar performed it's job pretty well for being a sub-$100 investment.

JoeB4ever says:

As a home theater installer I've set up dozens of soundbars. They've gotten really popular especially since the speakers inside TVs are horrible.

The way they "simulate" surround sound is they usually have several speakers inside them. Normally a couple of tweeters and a couple of mid-ranges. Most of them come with a wireless subwoofer. I've never sold a soundbar because of it's "simulated surround" feature. It's because they sound a ton better than TV speakers.

stogrady says:

The specs mention HDMI 1.4 out.

With my current setup I have three HDMI devices that switch via the receiver I'm using.

Would it be possible to incorporate this device with my current setup? I've wanted a good soundbar for a while now (have a relatively small space in a condo) and Android functionality would be great!

TJH132 says:

Philips /is/...

dancing-bass says:

Yeah I noticed that too. No clue as to the correct grammar here.

"Philips is" as in "The company called Philips is doing THIS"

or is it

"Philips are" as in "The staff of Philips are working on THIS"

sorry. Normallly I don't pull the grammar/spelling police thing. This one I just don't know what the CORRECT way is. Sometimes the rule "just go with what sounds best when you say it" is very misleading! So, anyone know what the correct way to phrase the 3rd sentence is?

On a side note. How the heck does a single enclosure even compare to a true 5.1 or 7.1 surround system with dedicated speakers for each channel? Never heard one live so I'm just curious if they actually do a decent job (or if it's just left/right channels with a digital delay to simulate a true surround experience)

pjnola says:

Actually, if Richard is British, "Phillips are" would be preferred. The idea is that Phillips is a collection of people, therefore plural. You can hear this, for example, from soccer match announcers: "Chelsea are pressing the box".

I am British, thanks for noticing :-)

japclev says:

I love my Samsung bar.... Its a decent alternative to wires and cost efficient as well... This thing sounds good.

TJH132 says:

"The company Philips is..." Sounds correct to me, just as "the company Procter & Gamble are..." doesn't.

igeekman says:

Can't wait for the giveaway!!!!