Securing your mobile experience is all about using what works for you, and lynk adds a potentially compelling option to the mix.

There are plenty of way to make your Android device more secure, but balancing usability with security is a constant problem to be dealt with. The folks behind lynk have created a physical option for tech savvy users who aren't usually far from their phone. It's a Bluetooth beacon capable of acting as an NFC proxy, with an app that acts as a password manager and helps you with an alarm system in case you've misplaced your phone. On top of all these promises, lynk claims multiple months of battery life.

It's an impressive laundry list of things to be capable of, and if it works even half as well as the demonstration video claims this could be an enticing option for users interested in new forms of device security.


The lynk fob pairs to your phone via NFC, and once the Bluetooth LE connection is established you can accomplish quite a bit. The fob acts as physical authentication for stored passwords, making it so you can tap the fob to the back of the phone and be logged in to bank accounts and email clients alike. If you're able to use NFC payments in your area, lynk will act as pass through for the payment data, but since your phone needs to be out to access the app anyway that's not quite as useful as it sounds.

The most important function, outside of password management, is the location-aware alarm system. You can determine secure zones where it's fine for your phone to be away from the fob, and an alarm will sound if the two are separated anywhere else. The overall goal is theft prevention in public areas, but clearly there are plenty of other uses for the technology.

lynk is currently setup as an IndieGoGo campaign starting at $40, which gets you the fob and link to the app to get setup. The fob comes apart easily for the battery to be replaced, which in theory only happens a couple times a year. This looks like a simple security addition to your mobile experience on paper, but it's ultimately going to come down to the quality of the app and whether these features work as advertised.