Headlines

2 years ago

Nook Tablet torn down, found to have Nook Tablet parts inside

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The folks at iFixit have done their thing to the Barnes & Noble Nook Tablet. Not a whole lot to learn here -- it's got electronics and stuff inside. You're not likely to be doing any sort of repairs on this thing yourself because of the way it's put together, but then again you weren't likely to be doing any sort of repairs on this thing yourself, because you have better things to do -- like use the Nook Tablet.

Source: iFixit

 

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2 years ago

Barnes & Noble Nook Tablet rooted

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The Nook Tablet has root access. Repeat: The Nook Tablet has root access. Shouldn't be a huge surprise, given that its older brother, the Nook Color, quickly became one of the most hacked devices of the past year, but the updated version (see our hands-on) has far beefier hardware inside, and so we're all that more eager to crack it wide open.

You've got a couple of options for the procedure -- some handy executable files, or a mere eight lines in the command propt if you prefer to do things yourself. Find it all at the source link below.

Source: XDA Developers; more: Nook Tablet forums

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2 years ago

Motorola Droid XYBOARD 8.2 picture surfaces, Verizon LTE on board

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And the winner for the worst device name goes to (drum roll please) the Motorola Droid XYBOARD.  Previous winner Sprint Samsung Galaxy S II, Epic 4G Touch will present the trophy.

All kidding aside, the 8.2-inch version of the Droid XYBOARD has been pictured at PocketNow, and as expected, there's a big old LTE logo on the back.  Also known as the Motorola Xoom 8.2 Media Edition, the Droid XYBOARD should launch with Android 3.2, a 1.2 GHz CPU, 1GB of RAM, and 16GB of storage.  It should prove to be a capable device, eventually get upgraded to Ice Cream Sandwich, and the 8.2-inch size is sure to appeal to more than a few.  Rumors say to expect an official announcement soonish.

Source: Pocketnow

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2 years ago

Courtroom roundup: Moto v Apple, B&N v Microsoft, Samsung's new Tab, and more software patents

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What would a week in the mobile arena without legal drama be like?  We have no idea, and probably never will.  Today there's so much that we're just going to round it all up in one easy spot, then take a couple aspirin and chase the headache away.  Without further adieu:

Motorola v Apple

Motorola will likely win another injunction against Apple in Germany.  This time, it's a method describing how a mobile device synchronizes data with a server, and Moto seems pretty confident that iCloud and MobileMe violate their patents.  This time the patents in question aren't covered under a FRAND defense, so Apple and Moto may have to fight this one out -- a move which Apple feels will cost over 2.7 billion (with a B) dollars.  Read more at Phone Arena

BN v Microsoft

Barnes & Noble have filed more than 45 pages worth of links to prior art in their defense against Microsoft.  Things ranging from Mosaic, Netscape, Unix man pages, and even work shown by Microsoft themselves.  All these examples pre-date the patents Microsoft is using in their suit, and it looks like B&N is pretty damn serious about fighting back.  Take a few aspirin of your own and check out Groklaw for the full details.

Samsung's redesigned German Galaxy Tab

Samsung has skirted their way around the ban of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Germany.  A slight redesign where the metal bezel now wraps around the front of the device and is visible was all the German courts needed to allow the tablet to be sold.  Personally, I would have redesigned it with rotating spikes designed to maim and cripple competitors (yes, I just watched Mad Max again), but there's a reason I'm not in charge of anything.  I wonder how many millions were wasted on this one?  See PCMag for more details.

Google's unlock patent

Google was granted a patent on the pattern unlock method they use for Android smartphones.  And patents of ideas are still just as wrong as they ever were, even when it's Google getting them.  In addition, Google was granted a patent on the method to use lockscreen based gestures to control other phone functions (think gesture based app launching).  Could this mean Google has plans to add some new features to the lockscreen?  Hurry up Android 5.0!  Read more at 9 to 5 Google.

Is it happy hour yet?  Thanks everyone who tipped us about these!

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2 years ago

Root your Kindle Fire, kiss Amazon streaming video goodbye

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By the way (if you haven't already noticed this by now): If you root your Kindle Fire, Amazon's streaming video will balk at you. The good news is it takes just a few seconds to unroot using SuperOneClick, and everything is both hunky and dory. Still, we'd prefer to not be thought of as potential pirates all the time, m'kay, Amazon?

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2 years ago

Redux TV for Android tablets get an early look thanks to an Android Central member

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

A few weeks back we looked at Redux on Google TV (check it out here, it's pretty sweet), and Android Central member HAAS599 posted the comment we all were thinking:

Why is this not on my Tablet?

In some crazy random act of coolness, Andy from Redux decided to shoot a copy of what's currently under development to HAAS599 so he could have a look.  He lets us have a look (with permission from the fellows at Redux) by shooting some video of the app in action.  If you use a Honeycomb tablet, you'll be interested.  Curated channels filled with great content from all over the web, in a package that is easy and intuitive to use and navigate.  These are the kinds of apps that make a tablet worth having, and Redux is one we're waiting for.  Head into the forums and check it out.

Source: Redux TV is coming to a tablet near you!

More: ReduxThanks, HAAS599!

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2 years ago

Verizon's Galaxy Nexus revealed to be unsurprisingly thicker than its GSM counterpart

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Google this morning has outed the tech specs on the LTE (aka Verizon's) version of the Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Surprise, surprise, it's a tad thicker, as LTE devices are prone to be. How much thicker? According to the new specs, Verizon's LTE version (that's the one you see at right above) is a portly 9.47 mm, while the GSM version (seen here at left) is 8.94 mm thick. By our math, that's .53 mm thicker if you opt for the Verizon version here in the states (and it's still looking like that'll be the only domestic version for a little while).

By comparison, the new HTC Rezound is about 13.7 mm thick, the Droid Bionic is about 10.16 mm, and the Droid RAZR is 7.1 mm at its thinnest point.

The other spec of note, of course, is that Verizon's version will carry an 1850 mAh battery. That's a little larger than what you probably have in your current phone. And while we welcome any additional juice, an extra 100 mAh or so really isn't going to boost your usage by all that much, when you remember just how thirsty LTE radios are. But we're not looking that gift horse in the mouth.

Source: Google
Thanks to everyone who sent this in!

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2 years ago

Android Market on the Kindle Fire? Done!

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T'was only a matter of time, right? The Android Market -- and all of its hidden secrets apps -- now runs just fine on the Amazon Kindle Fire. There are a couple of caveats (albeit not huge ones) if you want to get this done. You're going to need to root your Kindle Fire, and you're going to need to be a little familiar with file explorers and apps permissions. Hardly insurmountable stuff, though, and the whole process takes just a few minutes. Hit the link below for full instructions.

Source: XDA Developers; via Kindle Fire Forums

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2 years ago

Good grief! 'A Charlie Brown Christmas' now available on your Android phone or tablet

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This might be the best $6.99 you spend this holiday season. LoudCrow Interactive -- the company behind bringing the Sandra Boynton books to Android -- has brought the classic "A Charlie Brown Christmas" to phones and tablets.

It's the same interactive reading experience we've come to know and love, right down to Schroeder's piano. Chances are you'll enjoy this as much as your kids.

We've got demo video and download links after the break.

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2 years ago

Kindle Fire runs third-party launchers just fine, thank you very much

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Say, for some reason, you just got yourself a brand new Kindle Fire and for some reason don't want to run the custom launcher Amazon's whipped up. (And it's pretty darn good, actually.) Now that we've got proper ADB access, loading a third-party launcher is just a few clicks away. (Or you can install through a file explorer on the device, if you want.)

We've got ADW.EX running with nary a problem. And just like on any other smartphone or tablet, you can set it to be the default launcher. You've still got Amazon's menu bars on the top and bottom, but everything else is third-party, along with the usual customizations.

Now, don't be surprised if you do see some hiccups -- you're basically running an app, and there are still parts of the Android framework that have been stripped out of the Kindle Fire. But if you like to tinker, here's an easy thing to try.

Check out our hands-on video after the break.

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