Headlines

2 years ago

Motorola Droid 4 has an unlockable ... battery cover?

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So here's the Motorola Droid 4. We're about to do our thing to it as only we can in our full Droid 4 review, but here it is in a nutshell: Fast device, blue display, good build, great keyboard, and the craziest damn battery cover contraption we've ever seen.

Check this out: The little plastic thing you see here -- sized up against a 2005 California quarter -- is the battery cover unlocking mechanism tool device thingy, or BCUMTDT for short. It's not unlike the iPhone's "SIM unlock tool," which is a fancy way of saying "thing you put in a hole to remove some other thing." It's craziness, we say.

What's hiding under that battery cover? Well, not a battery, for one. As you no doubt by now know from our hands-on with the Droid 4 at CES, you can't actually remove the battery from the phone.

So why bother with the battery cover unlocking mechanism tool device? There are other goodies tucked away under there -- mainly the micro SIM card for 4G LTE data, the microSD card -- and one last surprise, which we'll uncover in the video after the break.

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2 years ago

TELUS kicks off LTE network with Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 and LG Optimus LTE

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The third of Canada's big three carriers is finally launching their LTE network. Starting tomorrow, TELUS will be offering the Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 and LG Optimus, both with LTE connectivity. Not far behind that is the Samsung Galaxy Note, which is due to drop on February 14 with a $199 pricetag on contract. We had caught a glimpse of the LG Optimus LTE bound for TELUS last week, but now everything is super-duper official.

The TELUS LTE network will cover all of the major centers, and a few of the smaller ones. Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, Calgary, Edmonton and Ottawa are the biggies,  but Kitchener-Waterloo, Guelph, Hamilton, Belleville, Quebec City, Halifax, and even Yellowknife will have coverage as well. By the end of the year, TELUS aims to douse 25 million Canadians with delicious LTE service. Target speeds will be in the average of 12 - 25 Mbps, and capping out at 75 Mbps.  

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2 years ago

Nokia N9 gets a taste of Ice Cream Sandwich in early screenshot

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The Nokia N9 is a great piece of hardware, some users have been pining for Android on the device instead of the built-in MeeGo OS. As it's a relatively developer-friendly phone, it wasn't long before some enterprising hackers got to work porting Android 2.x, and later 4.0, to the N9.

One such developer, Alexey Roslyakov of the NITDroid team, appears to have made significant progress bringing ICS over to the Nokia N9's stylish hardware. He tweeted several images, including the one above, which shows the familiar Android 4.0 launcher being beamed from the N9's AMOLED display. The developer also says he's working on the ability to dual-boot between MeeGo and Android, making it easy to go back to the stock software.

As with any port of Android to unsupported hardware, progress is likely to be steady but slow, and judging by the rendering anomalies in the screenshot, there's still a fair bit of work to be done. Proprietary hardware drivers remain a significant issue, as they are on the CyanogenMod 9 port for the HP TouchPad. Unlike the TouchPad, though, there's been no N9 fire-sale, and the device remains around £400-500 mark this side of the pond.

So for the moment, this is one for the enthusiasts. But we have to admit that if it ever turns into a fully-functional port, we may be just a little big jealous of all you N9 owners.

Source: @drunkdebugger; via: Slashgear

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2 years ago

Google to launch cloud drive service says WSJ

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Google is set to release their own shared cloud storage solution, says the Wall Street Journal.  Their insiders have said that Google will soon launch called "Drive" will rival Dropbox in functionality, being able to "store photos, documents and videos on Google's servers so that they could be accessible from any Web-connected device and allows them to easily share the files with others."  It sounds like it will have some overlap with Picasa, Google Docs, and Youtube, but at this time nobody has all the particulars.  

The new service, expected to launch in the coming weeks or months, will be free for most folks, businesses included.  Google will only charge those who want to "store a large amount of files", so there will be a premium service with more capacity.  If Google does release this one, we would certainly expect it to hit Android devices soon after.  Could this be the big thing at Google I/O this year?

Source: WSJ

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2 years ago

Late-night poll: Do you use lockscreen security?

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Security is important.  We carry a crapload of information in our phones, and with the world of NFC payments slowly becoming a reality, we'll be keeping even more in our pocket and in the cloud.  As we saw earlier today late yesterday, keeping things like PIN codes safe is tough with so many eyes out there trying to find a way around it.  Nobody should have been surprised, nothing is 100 percent secure.  

That's why it's always a good idea to use more than one way to stay safer.  You have secure tokens and password encrypted information on you phone, but keeping people from even getting that far is easy to do with a secure lockscreen.  Android is like Unix, and when someone gets to your homescreen, they're essentially logged in as you.  They can start any application that you can, and start any service.  If you're rooted it's even worse, they can grant super user privileges to anything.

On the other hand, having to unlock your phone every time you get an IM or e-mail gets old fast.  For someone who has never lost a phone, the idea of skipping secure methods seems sensible.  We're not going to argue, your logic is sound (even if others think differently) and it's your device to use the way that makes you happy.  But we're curious.  Answer the poll and let us know!

Thanks, Icebike!

 

Do you use lockscreen security?

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2 years ago

Google-Motorola deal set to be approved by U.S. Justice Department, says WSJ

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Google's aquisition of Motorola Mobility is set to be approved by the U.S. Justice Department as early as next week, according to the Wall Street Journal and people "familiar with the matter." These sort of deals are never a given, as the various governments across the world always have the final say on matters of commerce. This deal would arm Google with very desirable hardware patents for mobile devices, which really is the reason for the entire investigation.

The Justice Department, as well as European Union legislators, are very concerned that Google allows other companies to use these patents under FRAND (fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory) rules, which prohibit things like overcharging for licenses or blocking access to the patents outright.  They should be -- look at all the legal mess smartphone manufacturers are in now, then muddy that picture further by changing license requirements for the things that make a cell phone work. We're not talking lock screens or rounded corners here, Motorola owns IP that all cell phones need and use to operate. Taking away licenses for core technology would benefit nobody, and Google has pledged not to do it. 

Instead, Google has sent letters to to numerous standards organizations, stating that it would offer FRAND licensing for patents in Motorola's portfolio. They didn't promise not to seek damages or injunctions from potential violators, though. Google stated that it "reserves its right to seek any and all appropriate judicial remedies against counterparties that refuse to license its FRAND patents."  Mutual destruction tactics at their finest.

We tend to take things like this from the Wall Street Journal at face value, and this is no exception.  Their track record stands on it's own.  If this is true, and the EU (whose own deadline for a decision is Feb. 13) gives a green light we should know more next week.  We'll keep you posted.

Source (paid content): WSJ

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2 years ago

Google Wallet PIN security cracked - here's what you need to know

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Google Wallet's PIN security has been cracked, but there's a caveat -- this currently only is an issue if your phone is rooted. Not rooted? No worries. And with that said and done, here's the deal:

Your Google Wallet PIN (Personal Identification Number) is stored encrypted on your device, and a brute-force method was found to expose the SHA256 hex-encoded PIN information inside the database. This method, which was irresponsibly released to the public, can find the PIN without any incorrect attempts in the Wallet app itself, negating the five-try rule the application has for PIN entry.  (See it in action after the break.)

Now here's the not so sexy way to describe it all.  You'll need to have a phone with Google Wallet, AND have rooted your device, AND have not set a secure lock screen, AND then lose your phone. The person who finds it THEN can use the app the fellows at zvleo have made and since distributed to brute-force the PIN and THEN can use your phone to make payments, just like they could if they found your credit card, which likely would be quicker and easier than any of this.

Google has been notified and already knows how to fix the issue, but there's a problem. To make it more secure, Google will have to move the PIN information to be controlled and maintained by your bank. This not only will require some changes to the terms of service, but then we're relying on corporate banking institutions to keep our information safe. I'd wager that Citigroup's servers are easier to break into than Google's, and then you have the same issue all over again.

A better way to fix the problem would be to force users to use a better password. PIN information can be cracked so easy because it only uses four numbers. This means that there are only 10,000 possible combinations, and even a portable computer like your Android phone can pull off that sort of brute-force attack. Change the passcode to something like Fgtr5400&d77 -- using a combination of letters, numbers and symbols -- and it's far less likely to be broken, and even less likely to even be used because it's not convenient.  It's a Catch-22 -- a PIN is easy to use and remember, but it's also more easy to crack.

I'm not going to tell you to stop using Google Wallet, nor am I going to tell you to stop rooting your phone. I am going to tell you to pick it up, and put a passcode on the lock screen now, before you lose it.  

Source: zvelo

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2 years ago

Google+ app updated with 'massive performance improvements' and some UI tweaks

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If you're a Google+ fan and have an Android phone, you'll want to hit the Android Market because there's an update for Google+ that promises (among other things) "massive performance improvements" across the app.  The full changelog:

  • Massive performance improvements across the app
  • What's Hot!
  • View who +1'd a post or comment
  • Stream posts shortened to fit more per scroll
  • Infinite photos feed in 'From your circles'
  • Stream no longer jumps to the top for an automatic refresh

I never really noticed any poor performance from the app to start with, so I'm not yet ready to judge these massive improvements, but the rest of the list has a bunch of welcome changes.  The addition of What's Hot! and ability to see who +1'd a post or comment are things many have been asking for, and UI improvements like better formatting of posts and no longer bouncing to the top and losing your place when you refresh are always welcome.  Now let's focus on a tablet optimized version, shall we Google?  Maybe walk over and visit the cubes of the folks working on Currents.

Download link is after the break.

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2 years ago

HTC, Vodafone Germany to launch first 4G LTE phone -- the HTC Velocity

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Vodafone Germany customers will soon be able to pick up the network's first 4G LTE smartphone, the HTC Velocity, according to reports from German site Computer Woche. The device will be familiar to readers in the U.S., as stateside it's known as the AT&T HTC Vivid. As well as supporting the insane speeds we've come to expect from LTE networks, the Velocity also sports HSPA+ connectivity up to 42.2 Mb/sec, alongside good old-fashioned 2G and 3G.

Internally, the device is similar to many of HTC's other high-end smartphones. There's a 1.5GHz dual-core chip inside, along with a full gigabyte of RAM, a 4.5-inch qHD (960x540) screen and Android 2.3 Gingerbread, backed up by HTC Sense 3.5. Frequency-wise, the HTC Velocity supports LTE on 800/2600MHz in addition to UMTS/HSPA on 900/2100MHz, meaning it should work on other LTE networks across Europe once they start rolling out.

So it's an HTC Vivid for Europe. Speaking of which, you can check out our review of that device to get an idea of what you'll be dealing with if you pick up an HTC Velocity in the future. We'll keep you posted with any release date or pricing info as it becomes available.

Source: Computer Woche; via: Engadget Mobile

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2 years ago

Galaxy Nexus now available on Videotron, C$150 on contract

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Just as planned, Quebec-centric carrier Videotron has today launched the Samsung Galaxy Nexus on its network. Canadians wanting to use Samsung and Google's flagship smartphone on Videotron can now pick one up for the subsidized price of C$149.95, with a qualifying service plan of C$40 or more per month. Or if you don't fancy paying 40 dollars per month for the next three years, Videotron's also selling it on its own at the retail price of C$599.95.

Videtron is the latest in a long list of Canadian networks currently offering the Galaxy Nexus. This includes the big three -- Bell, TELUS and Rogers -- as well as smaller players like Fido, Mobilicity and WIND. Hit the source link for more on Videotron's Galaxy Nexus deals, and check out our review of the thing if for some reason you're still on the fence.

Source: Videotron

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