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5 years ago

How to: Put custom ROMs on Nexus One

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Custom ROMs on the Nexus One

Maybe you saw our hands-on with Sense on the Nexus One and wanted to do it yourself. Or maybe you're finally ready to take the leap and give CyanogenMod a try. Either way, our forums guru Jeremy Sikora has put together an excellent guide on how to load custom ROMs onto the Nexus One. It's a must-read for anyone looking to get the most out of their device. [AndroidCentral Forums]

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5 years ago

Monthly Maintenance - keeping things speedy

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Hey there, everybody!  This week we’re going to talk about something everyone seems to forget  - system maintenance and clean-up.  Like any computer, our Android devices can get clogged with old info that builds up until performance starts to be affected.  Unlike a computer with Gigs of space, our device's storage space is limited so this can happen in a much shorter time span.  If your phone is starting to act a bit sluggish this might be the reason.  Freeing up some space and getting things back as they used to be isn’t hard at all once you know where to look for the clutter. Join us after the break!

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5 years ago

Using Gmail as your own personal push mail server

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One of the biggest complaints from those migrating over from a Blackberry to an Android device has got to be e-mail.  We get used to doing things a certain way, and feel lost when things change.  Even if you’re not used to Blackberry’s push mail this is a great method to not only get things more organized, but save some battery as well.  Join us after the break!

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5 years ago

How to manually update your Samsung Moment

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Samsung Moment update

We continue to wait for the Android 2.1 update to come to the Samsung Moment, but there is still a maintenance fix rolling out. If you gone to a Sprint Store to do it, you can now install it yourself. Here's what's being fixed:

  • Network Assist GPS to allow indoor location fix.
  • Updates to several third-party apps, including Visual Voicemail, NFL, NASCAR and Sprint TV.
  • Change to Emergency Dial on lock screen.
  • Hard reset available in recovery mode: remove and reinsert battery; press volume down, send and end keys until reboot option pops up; scroll to wipe data/factory reset; press OK.
  • Various improvements to battery life.

You can find the update download here. And if you need more help, click here for complete instructions. Thanks, Sammael!

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5 years ago

SDKs, drivers and roots - Oh, my!

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Inside Android

Hey, all. Introducing a new feature to our AndroidCentral readers. It's a little space where we can discuss and feature the weeks best in the Android modding and hacking community, in terms that even those new to Android can understand.

This won't be device or carrier specific, so think of it as a showcase of everything Android has to offer us because of its open nature. Our seasoned veterans may find some of this redundant, but we're going to try to keep things on a level all can understand so we stay on the same page. This week's version is going to be a bit long so we can introduce some things, so bear with me.

Please keep in mind I can't be everywhere at once (until I perfect my cloning machine!) so it's possible I'll miss something that you didn't. The best way to keep that from happening is to send me your tips and links about all the cool ways we are customizing our phones. Just like the customizing community let's make this a joint effort!

Now on to the goodies.

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5 years ago

Android 101: Copy files to your storage card in Windows

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Android storage count mounting

For as easy as Android can make your life, the simple task of getting photos, video and music from your computer to your phone isn't quite as straightforward as it should be. We're going to put an end to that right now. After the break: How to get your storage card to show up on your computer. No rooting. No extra programs. Just a few simple steps.

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5 years ago

How to manually update your Nexus One

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Neuxs One manual update

If you're the type who just can't wait for an update to be pushed out (erm, like some of us around here), you're in luck. You can manually apply today's update to your Nexus One, enabling multitouch and (hopefully) fixing that pesky T-Mobile 3G issue. Here's how to do it: [via Android Forums]

  1. Download the update from here (Google official) or here (mirror).
  2. Rename the file to update.zip. Note that if you're using Windows, just rename it to "update" (no quotes, of course) because it's already a zipped file.
  3. Copy the update.zip file onto your microSD card.
  4. With your Nexus One off, hold down the trackball and press the power button.
  5. You'll be booted into a white screen with three Android robots on skateboards. Select "Bootloader."
  6. On the next screen, select "Recovery."
  7. Your phone will reboot, giving you a picture of the Android robot and an exclamation point inside a triangle.
  8. Now press the power button and volume up button at the same time. It could take a couple of tries.
  9. Now (using the trackball this time) choose "Apply sdcard:update.zip" and let things run their course.

You may have to soft reset a couple of times after this. (I got a picture of the Android guy outside of a box. But a couple resets later and all was well.) But now multitouch is enabled, and we can sit back and relax, knowing that we have zero patience and just can't help ourselves.

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5 years ago

Quick tip: See what's using the battery

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Android battery usage

For Android 1.6+ If your battery isn't lasting as long as you think it should (does it really ever?), there could be a rogue process or application sucking down more juice than it should. And keeping an eye on what's hitting the battery is pretty simple.

Just go to Settings>About phone>Battery use and you'll get an easy-to-read chart showing what's been going on since your phone was last plugged in. Chances are the display (as in the phone's screen) will be near the top of the list, so turning down the brightness might be one of the first things you try.

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5 years ago

Quick tip: Turn off Nexus One voice input, gain a comma on the keyboard

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Nexus One voice inputComma on the keyboard

Sure, being able dictate e-mails, text messages -- anything you want, really -- to your Nexus One is pretty darn cool. But it comes at a price: There's no comma directly on the on-screen keyboard. OK, you can hold down the period, or switch over to the symbols to get it. But for me, that's one step too many. But you can put the comma back on top of the keyboard, if you don't mind trading voice input to do so. Here are the steps:

  1. With the on-screen keyboard open, hold down on ?123 (in the bottom left corner)
  2. Choose Android keyboard settings from the pop-up.
  3. Uncheck Voice input.

That's it. You'll now have a comma back on top of the on-screen keyboard, at the expense of voice input. You can always turn it back on, though, doing the same steps. [@bck via @palmsolo]

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5 years ago

How to: Hard-reset the Nexus One

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Nexus One Hard reset

Two words phrases we throw around a lot: Soft reset and hard reset. The former is what it's called when you turn your phone off and on, or pull the battery. The latter is a bit more drastic. But sometimes things go wrong, and you need to restore it back to its factory settings, wiping all of your applications and personal data. Here's how you hard reset the Google Nexus One:

  1. With the phone off, hold the Volume Down button and press and release the Power button.
  2. You'll boot into the menu you see above with the little skateboard guys. Select Clear Storage from the list by pressing the Volume Down button.
  3. Press the Power button, and confirm by pressing Volume Up.
  4. Sit back while your phone reboots in its virgin state.

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5 years ago

How to: Force Nexus One into 3G mode

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T-Mobile 3G workaround

We're still waiting on a fix for the problem the Nexus One is having staying connected to 3G (and we don't really care who fixes it -- Google, HTC, T-Mobile or whomever). In the meantime, there's a workaround that will force your phone to only connect with 3G.

So join us after the break if that's the sort of thing you're looking for. (With a big tip of the hat to XDA Developers)

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5 years ago

Hit the Home button twice to go back to the main screen

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 On your Home screen but lost on some page full of widgets? Just hit the home button again and you'll jump to the main home screen.

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5 years ago

How to: Toughen the Droid's battery cover

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Motorola Droid battery cover

The first thing I was told after being handed a Motorola Droid was: "Be careful with that battery cover. It loves to come off." And, sure enough, it does.

The good news is that Bryan at The Gadgeteer has posted up a quick video showing a few quick seconds with a small flathead screwdriver can help keep that cover in place, so long as you don't mind some very minor surgery to your device. (We're not worried about it, but isn't really an official fix or anything.)

Check out video of Bryan's fix after the break, and let us know if it helps you any.

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6 years ago

Download Android G1 RC33 Update Now

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Instant gratification is never having to wait. Thanks to the XDA Developer community, the latest Google Android update is available now. Among other things, it includes Google Latitude, a location-based app that's created quite the stir among those with privacy concerns.

The Android update for the T-Mobile G1, RC33, will start rolling out today, February 5th, and will continue rolling out through the 15th. If you don't want to wait for the over-the-air (OTA) update, RC33 can be downloaded now and you can be running Google Latitude in no time.

If you want to know where to download it and how to update the firmware on your G1, then follow along after the break!

Sometimes things like firmware updates can feel daunting if you are trying to do it manually. The good news is that manually updating Android is a fairly simple process, the most difficult part being getting the new firmware version prior to receiving it OTA.

I recommend a fully-charged G1 before you begin this process. So if your G1 is charged and ready to go, then just follow these steps and you'll have an updated G1 in a matter of minutes.

DISCLAIMER: Android Central nor myself accept any responsibility for any mishaps that may occur during the update process. If you somehow manage to "brick" your phone, that's unfortunate, but it's ALL on you. Using these same steps, I managed to update my firmware without a hitch. Just remember that what you do with your G1 in your own home is YOUR business and YOUR responsibility. Now, with the sloppy legalese out of the way, are you ready?

  1. Download the RC33 file that's posted at XDA Developers here. VERY IMPORTANT: If you have root access ("jailbroken" G1), this update will NOT work for you. Community member JF has been very helpful in modifying updates to work for those with root access.
  2. Once you download the file to your computer, it should appear as: signed-PLAT-RC33-from-RC30.f06aa9b3.zip. This next part is important. Rename this file as update.zip.
  3. Make sure you have a Micro SD Card in your G1. Connect your G1 to your computer via USB. You should see the USB icon in the top left corner of your G1. Drag it down and enable the USB connection to your computer.
  4. On the desktop of your computer, drag and drop the update.zip file to your G1, placing it in the root of your Micro SD Card. Then, unplug your G1 from your computer.
  5. Turn off your G1. Make sure it's completely powered down. Then, turn it back on by holding the Home and End keys. Wait for the icon popup after the T-Mobile G1 logo screen. Slide open your keyboard and type Alt + L. The event log should be displayed.
  6. Press Alt + S to begin the update. If you have properly renamed the file to update.zip and placed it in the root directory of your Micro SD card (meaning that it's not in any other folders), the update should begin.
  7. Be patient. The update will take a few minutes. Be sure to follow the on-screen instructions. You will be instructed to press the Home + Back buttons to finish the update. Be aware that your G1 will reboot a few times to properly install the update.
  8. Enjoy your new, shiny RC33 update, complete with Google Latitude!
After you have updated your G1, let us know what you think! Thanks for the heads-up on the RC33 availability, Yoshi! [xda developers]

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6 years ago

Ask Android Central: How to Unlock And Use a T-Mobile G1

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Following up on one of our newest feature, Ask Android Central, where you guys ask the question and we provide the answer, we have a question from Ty Underwood regarding the T-Mobile G1's usefulness of being unlocked

Would an unlocked g1 run on other (gsm) networks without a hitch? There isn't any tmobile in my area and I was just curious. Thanks!

 

The T-Mobile G1 is certainly a popular device and Android is in the eyes of a prospective many but one sticking point with the G1 is its ties to T-Mobile. We at Android Central definitely understand your concern about T-Mobile as a carrier—paltry 3G network, spotty service—but luckily there are definite options to make it work on other carriers.

After the jump, Android Central answers how to use an unlocked G1.

Before we get started, we should note that there are a few roads you can take to get an unlocked G1. Our most recommended route? Become an Android Developer and purchase the Android Dev Phone 1 (aka a SIM and hardware unlocked G1 with a snazzy graphic on the back cover). After an initial $25 fee to become a developer, you purchase the phone for $399 and will be able to use ANY sim card from any carrier AND flash custom Android builds since the bootloader is unlocked as well. Honestly, the Android Dev Phone 1 offers an amount of freedom unmatched with other options.

The second option would be to buy a regular already sim-unlocked T-Mobile G1. There's a great web portal that lists unlocked T-Mobile G1's on eBay here.

And finally, the most popular option would be to buy the T-Mobile G1 contract-free from a T-Mobile retail store and then either wait 3 months for the unlock code OR purchase an unlock code from a reputable unlock source (some of the writers on Android Central used unlock-tmobileg1.com) if you want to get nasty with a different carrier immediately. You'll need to give the website your IMEI number which can be found in either the settings/About Phone/Status or by pressing *#06# in the dialer.

After you receive your unlock code, simply follow the instructions in this video:

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Basically insert a non T-Mobile SIM card and then enter your SIM unlock code. Voila. Your T-Mobile G1 is now just a G1. But you're not quite done yet, because the phone is not set up for data on other networks you'll have to tinker with some of the APN settings. Luckily, it's dead simple. For example, for AT&T:

Simply go to Settings > Wireless Controls > Mobile Networks > Access Point Names then hit Menu and select New APN. Enter the settings for your Network. For example, this will set up AT&T (If it's not mentioned on this list, leave it at whatever the default was:

  • APN Name: AT&T
  • APN: wap.cingular

And you're done! You'll be on your way to a fully functional G1 in no time. But buyer beware, since T-Mobile uses a funky band (in the US, at least) for their 3G Network it won't be compatible with your AT&T account meaning your unlocked for AT&T G1 will only be capable of lowly EDGE speeds. No 3G for you unlocked AT&T users. Why you ask? Well to quote the T-Mobile forums:

 

In the U.S., T-Mobile and AT&T both use GSM technologies, but there are fundamental incompatibilities in their 3G services. AT&T runs its 2G and 3G services at 850 and 1900 MHz. T-Mobile's 3G service uses 2100 MHz to transmit and 1700 MHz to receive.
The G1 can handle 2G service at 850, 900, 1800, and 1900 MHz, which pretty well covers the world's markets. But 3G comes only at 1700 and 2100 MHz. That takes care of T-Mobile in the U.S. and everyone else in the rest of the world. But it leaves out AT&T's 3G service.

 

Is that a bit of a downer? Well, of course since AT&T is the only other GSM carrier in the US. But at least you'll still be able to enjoy the openness of Android and its potential on AT&T after following our instructions!

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