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3 years ago

How to remove the Infuse 4G microSD card

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(Yes, you'll need instructions)

You really shouldn't need an instruction manual to remove the microSD card from a phone. But things get a little tricky with the Samsung Infuse 4G.

Open up the battery cover and there's no card to be found. OK, there's a picture of one on the FCC label, but where the heck is the card? Samsung tucked it up under the SIM card. It's spring-loaded and pops out straight down toward the bottom of the phone.

But that's not the only trick -- it's mounted face down. You'll need to make sure the printed side is down, and the gold contacts are facing up.

As for actually getting your fat fingers around and under the card to remove it? You're on your own. Check out our trials and tribulations after the break.

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3 years ago

What's a PRL?

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If you're on Sprint or Verizon, or another CDMA-based network, you might have heard the term PRL thrown around once or twice. It stands for Preferred Roaming List, and it's basically a way of telling your phone phone where to look for a signal so that you get faster, better connections.

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3 years ago

Keep your apps up to date

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3 years ago

Allow app installs from 'unknown sources'

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There comes a time in every Android user's life where you want to install an app not found in the Android Market. If it's your first time, you're greeted with, "For security, your phone is set to block installation of applications not obtained from the Android Market" message as you try to install.

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3 years ago

What do screen resolutions mean?

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4 years ago

How to turn off LTE on the HTC ThunderBolt [from the forums]

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Find the latest HTC ThunderBolt accessories

 HTC ThunderBolt LTE off

Many of us have been frustrated, to say the least, that there's no toggle switch to turn off the LTE radio in the HTC ThunderBolt like there is in, say, the Sprint EVO 4G or Epic 4G. You could open up the battery cover and pull the 4G SIM card, but that's ... what's the word ... work.

No matter. User cdunn05 over at the ThunderBolt Forums worked up the instructions to manually turn the LTE radio off while still leaving the 3G radio on using the following steps. It looks scarier than it is, and the best part is that it survives a reset. We've got full instructions in the ThunderBolt forums. [How to turn off ThunderBolt LTE] Thanks, cdunn05!

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4 years ago

How much memory is left?

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4 years ago

Find and share an Android app

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4 years ago

The Android Dictionary

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Android DictionaryThere are a lot of terms and Android abbreviations out there -- so many that we don't blame if you you're sometimes left wondering what it is we're talking about.

From ADB to OTA, from SDK to .apk, from JIT to GSM to CDMA ... well, you see where we're going with this.

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4 years ago

Video how-to: Manually updating your phone to a new Android version

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Whenever we talk updating our phones, we inevitably talk about "manual updates." And that leads to the inevitable questions, "Is it safe?" and "How do I do it?"

Manual updates are just like over-the-air (OTA) updates. Only difference is that instead of letting your phone download the update from a server somewhere, you download it yourself, move save it to you phone's SD card and then manually start the update process. In an OTA update, the phone does all this for you. But the big difference is that there's no waiting with manual updates.

In the video above -- edited for time purposes -- we walk you through manually updating the Nexus One to Android 2.3.3 Gingerbead. And note that this is for a stock phone -- unrooted, stock recovery, the whole nine yards.

The general process is similar for most phones, though you'll want to follow the instructions for your specific device. And as always, if you have more questions, hit us up in the Android Central Forums.

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4 years ago

How to manually update your Nexus S to Android 2.3.3

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GRI40

The Android 2.3.3 (GRI40 for those keeping score at home) OTA update for the Samsung Nexus S has started to roll out, but there's no need to wait -- it's a breeze to manually install.  Think of it as the OTA update, with less of the A.  What you need to do:

  • Grab the OTA package here [ link via XDA]
  • Rename it to update.zip.  This isn't needed for the Nexus S bootloader, but it makes things easy.
  • Copy it over to the internal storage on your Nexus S.
  • Power off, then hold volume up and power to reboot to the bootloader.
  • Using the volume key to navigate, select recovery, then use the power button to confirm
  • When you see the warning triangle and arrow, hold the power button and tap volume up.  You'll see a menu.
  • From the menu, select "apply update from /sdcard", and choose update.zip from the list.
  • Let it do its thing and update your system, radio, and other partitions.  When finished, choose "reboot system now"
  • Enjoy!

Sound off in the comments how things are going for you.

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4 years ago

How to manually update your Nexus One to Android 2.3 Gingerbread

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Nexus One Gingerbread update

The Nexus One's over-the-air update to Android 2.3.3 Gingerbread (erm, not Android 2.4) is starting to push out. But if you can't wait (that'd be us), you can manually install the update. It's the same thing as the OTA update, just, not OTA. Here's how to install:

  1. Download the update from here. [link via XDA]
  2. Rename the file to update.zip. Note that if you're using Windows, just rename it to "update" (no quotes, of course) because it's already a zipped file.
  3. Copy the update.zip file onto your microSD card.
  4. With your Nexus One off, hold down the trackball and press the power button.
  5. You'll be booted into a white screen with three Android robots on skateboards. Select "Bootloader."
  6. On the next screen, select "Recovery."
  7. Your phone will reboot, giving you a picture of the Android robot and an exclamation point inside a triangle.
  8. Now press the power button and volume up button at the same time. It could take a couple of tries.
  9. Now (using the trackball this time) choose "Apply sdcard:update.zip" and let things run their course.

Easy peasy! Enjoy!

Update:  Seeing getprop/status 7 errors?  You'll need to update your version of Hboot.  If you're not familiar with fastboot and flashing, have a look here for the long (but easy) way.

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4 years ago

How to enable high speed uploads (HSUPA) on your Inspire 4G [root]

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HTC Inspire 4G

We're all a little bummed that AT&T has blocked the Inspire 4G from having full HSPA capabilities by keeping the radio non-HSUPA capable.  To be honest, we expected this based on their track record with HSPA Android devices, and tricks that work with the iPhone, like limiting bandwidth for YouTube uploads, won't last very long once dedicated Android hackers get into the mix.  They have the right to regulate bandwidth in the best interests of all customers, and just because you or I don't happen to agree with what they're doing doesn't change that.  We'll leave that for the government to sort out.

Now for the fun part.  It's easy to re-enable your high speed uploads on the Inspire -- turn it into a Desire HD.  They are the same phone, just branded a bit differently, so it's not a difficult feat. The hardest part (read -- what you're going to be the least familiar with) is rooting the darn thing.  The method is straightforward, but involves tools and processes that are pretty intimidating to the layman.  We're trying to find just the right person to help out and offer advice in our Inspire 4G forums, and if that's you, please don't be shy.  In the meantime, attn1 at XDA has a complete Inspire 4G hack kit available for those who feel up to the task.

Once rooted, it's as simple as installing one of the Desire HD custom ROMs and flashing a compatible kernel over it.  Both are widely available, and Android Revolution HD from mike1986 over at XDA-Developers, with the Telus Desire HD kernel is a great way to start.  Of course, we have a whole forum to talk shop about hacking the Inspire 4G, and you should jump in the discussion if you have questions, or answers!

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4 years ago

Can my device use Flash?

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Flash was included as a feature by default in Android 2.2 Froyo, but there are some phones that don't or can't support Flash. As a general rule of thumb anything that is "low-end" won't be able to run Adobe's flagship software, but there are a couple others that can't as well. Here's the list of Android devices certified to run Flash:

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4 years ago

Sideload apps on your AT&T phones using Linux [How-To]

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Designed for Linux

As Android gets more popular and mainstream, new users are coming out of the woodwork!  I'm very happy to say that a portion of those users are running Linux on their desktops, and they're hungry to learn the things we try to teach all you Windows users.  Since we have more than a few Linux-using Advisers and senior members in the forums, this is something we're more than happy to do.  And we're going to start with something that's pretty important to me -- sideloading apps on phones that have been altered.

It's not hard, it's all done through the terminal using commands you can cut and paste, and the setup from start to finish is laid out pretty clearly.  Check it out in the forums, and be on the lookout for more Linux tips and tricks from Android Central.  And if you're not a Linux user, but need to get your sideload on, check out the Sideload Wonder Machine for Windows.

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