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1 month ago

How to enable Google Hangouts on the Pixel

40

Get your Hangouts back!

The Pixel ships with Android 7.1, Google's latest version of Nougat that includes a number of improvements. But some Pixel owners may find a surprising omission when they load up the Pixel for the first time: a lack of Google Hangouts.

Some versions of the Pixel are shipping with Hangouts installed on the device but disabled, as Google tries to push people towards its new chat app, Allo. But if you, like me, are one of the remaining Hangouts diehards, here's how to re-enable it and get back to your old habits.

How to enable Hangouts on the Pixel

  1. On the home screen, swipe down from the notification shade.
  2. Tap on the Settings cog.
  3. Scroll down and tap on Apps.

  4. Scroll down and tap on Hangouts.
  5. Tap Enable.

After that, you can head to the Play Store and update the app to the latest version.

That's it! Now you can get back to using Hangouts and ignoring Allo, like the good ol' days.

Google Pixel + Pixel XL

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img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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1 month ago

How to use app shortcuts in Android 7.1 on the Google Pixel

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What's the big deal with app shortcuts on the Google Pixel and Android 7.1?

App shortcuts are one of the best new features in Android 7.1, and right now they're only available on the Pixel.

What are they? By holding down on a compatible app icon the home screen or app drawer of a compatible launcher (currently that's just the Pixel Launcher), you can access pre-defined shortcuts, and create new icons from those shortcuts. Want to quickly pull up the navigation directions to home from where you are? Do that from the Google Maps icon. Want to quickly check for app updates on the Play Store? You can do that, too! Here's how.

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1 month ago

Switching from iPhone to Android: Everything you need to know

35
 Everything you need to know

So you've seen the light and are switching from iPhone to Android. Welcome! Here's what you need to know!

Switching from iPhone to Android can be a bit daunting. If you're unpacking a brand new Pixel or Galaxy S7, or something else equally exciting, let us help you get set up quickly and easily!

If you've never used an Android phone before, there are a few things you should know before taking the leap (even though it's the leap home).

There's a learning curve

Switching from iPhone to Android isn't the same as upgrading the from the iPhone 6s to the iPhone 7. It's more akin to switching from Mac to PC (though not as drastic). General functions are still similar, but major Android phone manufacturers will often have proprietary user interfaces, distinguishing them from other makers.

Therein lies the rub. There is no single version of Android in the way that there's only one iOS. Companies take the Android operating system and interpret it and mold it according to their vision, meaning you'll get a different experience using a Samsung phone than you would using an HTC phone or an LG phone.

Though all Android operate similarly on a fundamental level, it's the little, finicky difference that set them all apart, so it may take some getting used to.

If you're just about to turn off your iPhone and put your SIM card into a brand new Pixel, Galaxy or something else shiny, here's what you need to know!

Turn off iMessage!

When you message other iPhones from your iPhone, they'll communicate via iMessage when you're connected to the internet. This is different from regular SMS texting, and if you leave iMessage turned on on your iPhone, many of your texts will still be routed through that service.

If you're on your new Android phone, you won't receive any of those messages. You need to disable iMessage before making the switch! (And while you're at it, turn off FaceTime.)

You might have to buy your apps again

If you have pay-upfront apps on your iPhone that you paid for, you'll likely have to buy them again from the Google Play Store if you want them on your Android phone.

The Google Play Store and the App Store are completely different entities, and the apps they house are made for different platforms. Some of the apps you had on your iPhone may not even be available for your Android phone and vice versa. That said, if you're subscribing to a service like Spotify or Evernote, you just need to download the app and log in on your new Android phone to get going.

You may need to re-sync your life

If you have all of your contacts, calendar events, photos, documents, and more synced with iCloud, and everything's on your iPhone, you'll likely have to re-sync everything on your Android phone.

Android's version of the cloud is housed in your Google apps, like Docs, Gmail, Contacts, Drive, and more. When setting up your Android phone, you'll set up a Google account and from there, you can actually sync some of your iCloud content with your Google account, so that you don't have to re-enter all of your dates, contacts, etc.

What you'll need to bring with you

You don't have to leave your life behind on your iPhone. You can bring your information with you so that you're not taking hours to populate your Android phone with all of your stuff.

Contacts

Yes, Google and Apple are direct competitors and the two biggest competitors in the mobile game, but neither makes it too difficult to switch teams. Rather than manually enter all of your contacts into your new Android phone, you can export your iPhone contacts in a few different ways.

Calendars

If your calendar is flush with events, it'd be a major pain in the behind to have to add them all in again once you've made the switch to Android. Luckily, all of your calendar info resides in files called ICS, which are widely used and easy to transfer.

Photos

Like most of us, your phone is probably your primary camera. You'll want to take those precious memories with you when you leave the land of Apple, especially if you're planning on erasing and selling your iPhone after. We recommend using Google Photos. Most Android phones have Google Photos pre-installed (and if not, it can be downloaded from the Play Store) and it's a super quick and easy process.

Documents

If you use iCloud Drive, then you probably have a few documents socked away and you might want to get rid of iCloud Drive in favor of Google Drive when you switch to Android. Transferring those files is easy if you use the iCloud Drive and Google Drive desktop apps!

Manufacturer tools

Some manufacturers have their own tools to help you migrate your information from a computer. So if you have all your iPhone data on a computer, you can add it to your Android phone using the maker's tool.

You won't be able to add an iPhone backup to your Android phone, but you'll be able to drag and drop contacts, music, and more from your computer.

Samsung Smart Switch

You'll need to use the desktop client to be able to move your iPhone data to your new Samsung phone. It's essentially the same as moving files around on your computer, but by connecting your Android phone to your computer, you'll be able to transfer everything right to your phone.

LG Bridge

LG Bridge lets you interact with your LG phone on your computer, where you can easily transfer all of the stuff you want to bring over when you migrate from iPhone to Android.

Pixel Switch

Each Google Pixel comes with a USB-OTG adapter that allows you to quickly and easily transfer files, contacts, calendar entries and even iMessages from an iPhone to your new Android phone.

Just remember

At the end of the day, switching to Android from iPhone is nowhere near as difficult as switching your writing hand, or even using that hand to write a test! An Android phone still performs the same basic functions you're used to: making calls, messaging, surfing the web, playing games, etc.

It may take some getting used to, but you might find yourself feeling freed with all the customizable options that Android has to offer (I took three days to decide my home screen layout when I got my first Android phone after switching from iPhone).

Have fun with it and really do your research before buying your first Android phone so that you make sure you're buying what's best for you.

If you need some help with choosing, check out our Smartphone Buyer's Guide, where we show you the particulars on just about every Android phone around, so that you can make an informed decision when it comes to switching over.

Questions?

Got a question about using and Android phone? Little nervous about making the switch? Let us know in the comments below!

Android Nougat

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1 month ago

How to transfer photos from iPhone to Android

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How to transfer iPhone photos to Android

How do I transfer my iPhone photos to my Android phone? With Google Photos, of course!

Like most of us, your phone is likely your primary camera and thanks to ease-of-use, you probably capture at least a few photos a day. Those add up over time, and it'd suck to lose them all just because you're switching from iPhone to Android. Thanks to Google Photos, you don't have to!

How to transfer iPhone photos to Android using Google Photos

  1. Download Google Photos from the App Store.
  2. Launch Google Photos from your Home screen.
  3. Tap Get started.
  4. Tap OK when asked to allow Google Photos to access your photos.
  5. Tap the switch next to Use cellular data to back up if you want to back up your photos over cellular. If you don't want to rack up a serious data bill, leave this off.
  6. Tap Continue.

    Tap Get started, tao OK, tap Continue

  7. Tap the circle next to either High quality or Original. Tapping High quality will compress your photos to 16 megapixels reduce file size, but you get "unlimited storage" (2PB). Original will maintain the original file size and will count toward your Google Drive storage (15GB).
  8. Tap Continue.
  9. Tap Get notified if you want notifications when someone shares photos with you. Otherwise tap No thanks.
  10. Tap Leave Off to leave notifications off if you selected No thanks.

    Tap Continue, tap Get notified, tap Leave Off

That's it! Google Photos will automatically sync your photo library and you'll be able to access them on your Android phone or virtually any device with an internet connection.

Don't expect to see your photos on a different device right away. The sync could take quite a while, especially if you have many photos.

Questions?

Questions about transferring photos with Google Photos? Let us know in the comments below!

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1 month ago

How to transfer your iCloud Drive files to Google Drive

7
How to transfer your iCloud Drive files to Google Drive

How do I transfer iCloud drive files to Google Drive? Hint: You'll need a computer!

If you're making the switch from iPhone to Android, then you'll likely want to take advantage of Google Drive and all the other Google Apps. That means you'll need to transfer your iCloud Drive files to Google Drive.

This can get a bit tricky, since Apple really doesn't want to see you go, but if you use the iCloud Drive and Google Drive desktop apps, it's easy.

You can do it without the desktop apps, but it's a bit of a pain.

How to transfer iCloud Drive files to Google Drive using the desktop apps

If you don't have the Google Drive app for Mac or PC, you'll need to download it before getting started. When you download it for Mac, a Finder shortcut will automatically be created under Favorites. When you download it for PC, you'll be asked if you want to create a shortcut in the File Explorer. Do it.

If you're on a Mac, you automatically have iCloud Drive. If you're on a PC, you'll need to download the iCloud Drive app before getting started.

  1. Open two Finder windows if you're on Mac or File Explorer windows if you're on PC.
  2. Click iCloud Drive in the left bar in one window.
  3. Click Google Drive in the left bar in the other window.
  4. Click the top file in the iCloud Drive folder.
  5. Hold the shift key and click the bottom file in the iCloud Drive folder.
  6. Click and drag all of your files over to the Google Drive folder.

That's it. Google Drive does the rest and syncs it all up for you.

How to transfer iCloud files to Google Drive on the web

If you don't want to download the iCloud Drive and Google Drive apps, you can (painstakingly) transfer files using the web apps. All you have to do is download each file from your iCloud Drive at icloud.com and re-upload everything to Google Drive.

The painstaking part comes in the fact that you have to download each individual file from your iCloud Drive. There is no way to batch-download or batch-transfer anything out of your iCloud Drive. I only recommend this method if you have just a few files to transfer.

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1 month ago

How to watch NFL games on your Android phone or tablet

34

What are the best way to watch football on my Android devices?

With the NFL season upon us, we want to make sure you're fully set to not miss a second of the action. We're going to run down how you can watch the big games live from your Android phone or tablet, and keep up to date on the latest developments.

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1 month ago

How to transfer your iCloud calendar to Android

23
How to sync your iPhone calendar to your Android phone

How do I get my iPhone's calendar onto my new Android phone?

If you're making the switch from iPhone to Android, you'll want to take all the things that matter in your life with you, i.e. your calendar, contacts, and other personal data.

Though there's no real way to "sync" your iPhone's iCloud calendar to your new Android phone, you can still transfer it over pretty simply.

Here's how!

How to transfer your iCloud calendar to your Android phone

First thing you'll need is a Google account set up on your Android phone. If you skipped that in the setup process, you'll need to create one.

On your iPhone

  1. Launch Settings from the Home screen.
  2. Tap Calendar.
  3. Tap Default Calendar.
  4. Tap the Gmail account you use with your Google calendar.

    Tap Calendar, tap Default Calendar, tap the Gmail account you use with your Google calendar

Now any dates you add to your iPhone calendar will be apart of your Google account calendar (in case you keep using your iPhone for a bit). This ensures that everything

On your Mac or PC

  1. Log into your iCloud account.
  2. Click Calendar.
  3. Click the broadcast button next to the calendar you want to share.

    Log into iCloud, click Calendar, click the broadcast button

  4. Click the checkbox next to Public Calendar.
  5. Copy the URL that appears and paste it in the address bar of your web browser. Do not hit enter yet.
  6. Replace webcal at the beginning of the URL with http and hit enter. You'll either be prompted to download an ICS file or one will automatically download to your default downloads folder.

    Click the checkbox next to Public Calendar, copy the URL into the address bar of your web browser, replace webcal at the beginning of the URL with http

  7. Go back to your iCloud Calendar and uncheck Public Calendar.
  8. Log into your Gmail account.
  9. Click the apps button on the upper right of your screen. It's a square made of nine smaller squares.
  10. Click Calendar.

    Go back and uncheck Public Calendar in iCloud, log into your Gmail account, click the apps button, click Calendar

  11. Click the settings button on the upper right of your screen. It's the gear icon.
  12. Click Settings.

    Click the settings button, click Settings

  13. Click the Calendars tab.
  14. Click Import calendar.

    Click the Calendars tab, click Import calendar

  15. Click Choose File or Browse, depending on your operating system.
  16. Click the ICS file you just downloaded from iCloud.
  17. Click Import.

    Click Choose File or Browse, click the ICS file you just downloaded from iCloud, click Import

Boom, you iPhone calendar events are now apart of your Google account. If you have multiple iPhone calendars, you'll want to repeat the same steps for each one.

Use SmoothSync

SmoothSync for Cloud Calendar is a handy app that lets you sync your iCloud calendars and reminders with your Android phone.

It's not the prettiest app in the world, but it gets the job done. All you have to do is enter your Apple ID and password, select the calendars you want to sync and that's it. It'll create new calendars on your Android phone for each iCloud calendar you had.

It's a great app for folks who like to keep both an iPhone and Android phone around, since you can set it to auto-sync, and you can use your Google calendar on your Android phone as normal; SmoothSync works in the background!

Download: SmoothSync ($2.86)

Questions?

Let us know in the comments below!

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1 month ago

Buy a Galaxy Note 7 used? Samsung has your back for an exchange

52

If you bought a used Galaxy Note 7, Samsung will help you out.

We've detailed the process for returning your Galaxy Note 7 if you had purchased through a carrier or retailer, but the phone had been out long enough that there were plenty of used and second-hand phones floating around out there as well. Thankfully you won't be left out in the cold if you bought a used Note 7: Samsung has a process for you to send in the phone and get a replacement.

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1 month ago

How to return your Galaxy Note 7

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Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Samsung has called for a return of every Note 7 that was sold or exchanged.

No matter where or when you bought your Galaxy Note 7, what carrier you're using it on or how long you've had it, you need to turn off your phone and return it for a refund or exchange. The process differs a bit between regions, carriers and retailers, but we have the information for you here that will remove at least one step of the process.

If you have a Galaxy Note 7, here's how you return it.

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1 month ago

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 fires, recall and cancellation: Everything you need to know

670
Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Here's all the information you need about the Galaxy Note 7 fires and recall — the events that led to the phone being discontinued.

We're well over a month into the saga of the Galaxy Note 7 recall, and events have taken many different twists and turns since the beginning of September. The crux of the situation is that Samsung faced a serious issue with Galaxy Note 7 phones that have a high propensity of batteries failing, leading to personal and property damage. In the original, pre-recall Note 7, hundreds of phones worldwide have had critical failures.

The phone was recalled officially in the U.S. once, and Samsung launched exchange programs in other countries. But the new models continued to see further issues, with replacement catching on fire in early October. This led to Samsung telling Note 7 owners to stop using the phones and return them, before permanently discontinuing the Note 7. Shortly thereafter, the U.S. CPSC officially issued a second recall.

Here's everything you need to know about this unprecedented situation.

Note: Last updated October 13 with details of the second CPSC recall.

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1 month ago

How to back up the data on your Galaxy Note 7 before returning it

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You'll need to switch phones when you turn in your Note 7, but you can still keep your stuff.

If you're going to be taking advantage of the U.S. carriers' offer to replace old and new Galaxy Note 7 phones (and you should) you probably want to keep a few things stored on it. Besides the obvious — things like your address book or email — you likely have pictures, music, and other important stuff on the thing. You don't have to lose it when you get a new phone.

The first thing to remember is that your Note 7 runs Android with Google's services. That means a lot of your data can be backed up to your Google account in the cloud. This is how Android was designed to work — it's a cloud-based operating system.

Email, contacts, and calendar

If you're using Gmail, your email is already backed up. Google's Contacts and Calendar work the same way. If you are signed into any of these services and use them, you can pick up right where you left off on any device, anywhere by signing in with the same account.

If you're using another online-based email service, like Yahoo! or Microsoft's Outlook.com, it sill works the same way. The data isn't tied to your Google account, of course, but once you sign back in with the same login you'll have access to everything again. This is true for email, address book, and calendar with most online services.

If you're syncing a POP email account (like the one from your internet provider) you will need to check the settings on your email account itself to see how message syncing is done. The people who provide you the service can help if you have any questions. For any local (read: not online) address book or calendar apps, you'll need to check the app settings and see if there is an export feature.

Finally, if you have your work email, contacts and calendar on your Note 7 you need to ask your friendly IT person what to do.

Your media

Chances are you are using the Note 7 camera to take a picture or two, and you want to keep them. You might have a handful of music files and a video or two on there as well. Luckily, backing media files up is easy.

You can store pictures on your computer and transfer them via a USB cable, or you can store them in the cloud. If you were to ask my recommendation, I'd point you towards Google Photos. But there are other services like Dropbox that work, too.

How to back up photos and video to your computer or the cloud

If you have a computer, backing photos up is easy. There's an advantage to using your own local storage to keep photos — there is no image loss or resizing involved. Hit the link above to see all your options and how to get started.

Music files work mostly the same way. Services like Google Play Music or Amazon Music let you use the cloud, or you can plug into your computer and copy between phone and PC at will. One advantage of using a cloud service is being able to stream your songs from any device, but the files may take a hit on quality. If your music is stored in a lossless format or a very high bitrate Mp3 make sure to keep a copy on your computer. Click the link below to see your options and how they work.

How to back up your music files to your computer or online storage

Samsung Smart Switch

If you're going to stick with the Note 7 or use any other Samsung Galaxy phone, you can use a service from Samsung called Smart Switch.

Using the cable that came in your box (and the adapter if you need it) you can copy all the data from all your apps, the apps themselves, all your accounts and all of your media files / SD card content from your Note 7 to a computer or another Galaxy phone. The program is easy to use and does a pretty good job.

How to use Samsung Smart Switch to back up your Galaxy phone

There are a couple things to keep in mind here.

  • Smart Switch is only an option if the phone you're putting the data on is a Samsung Galaxy phone. Smart Switch can pull the data off of any Android or iOS phone, but it can only copy it back to a Galaxy model.
  • If you're going to be using a really old Galaxy phone — something like the Galaxy S3 or Note 2 — you might have issues with apps and their data. Things have changed a lot in the past couple of years.
  • Any loaner you get from your carrier might not be compatible with Smart Switch. Your carrier isn't going to be handing out brand new Samsung phones like candy. Expect something that they wouldn't care about losing.

And remember — if you're returning your phone through your carrier or a Samsung store, they can help make sure you keep everything that's yours and help you get it on a new phone. It's OK to ask for help!

Samsung Galaxy Note 7

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1 month ago

How to set up a Wi-Fi hotspot on an Android phone

5
Tethering

How to share your Android phone's mobile data connection with laptops, tablets and other devices.

Setting up a Wi-Fi hotspot is an easy way to share your phone's data connection with another device, like a tablet, Mac or PC. Tethering to your phone over Wi-Fi is often easier than using a cable, and you can have multiple devices connected if need be.

Android has had Wi-Fi hotspot capabilities built in for years now, though depending on your carrier, or the model of phone you have, it may work slightly differently. In this article, we're going to cover the most common options — stock (unmodified) Android, and Samsung Galaxy phones.

NOTE: Tethering can quickly drain your battery, and use a lot of mobile data, so be careful!

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2 months ago

How to upload videos and manage the YouTube app for Android

1
How to manage the YouTube app for Android

How do I upload to YouTube on Android?

Watching videos and subscribing to channels is what YouTube's all about, but there's so much more you can do, like uploading your own videos, messaging other YouTubers, and all those settings that'll help make your experience more enjoyable and help keep your data usage to a minimum.

Here's how to manage YouTube so that it works for you.

How to upload videos

You can upload video straight from your phone to the YouTube app.

  1. Launch YouTube from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the account button. It looks like a person.
  3. Tap My Videos.

    Launch YouTube, tap the account button, tap My Videos

  4. Tap the upload button. It's an upward arrow with a line under it.
  5. Tap an existing video or tap the video button at the top of your screen to take video.
  6. Enter a title and description for your video.

    Tap the upload button, choose a video or take a new one, enter a title and description

  7. Tap the dropdown menu under Privacy.
  8. Tap a privacy option:
    • Public: Anyone can search for and view your video
    • Unlisted: Anyone with a link can view your video but won't find it in a search
    • Private: Only you can view your video
  9. Tap the next button on the top right of your screen. It's the arrow.

    Tap the dropdown menu, choose a privacy setting for your video, tap the next button to upload

Depending on the length of your video and your internet connection, it could take anywhere from seconds to an hour to upload.

How to change upload network preferences

You can set whether or not you want to upload videos when not connected to Wi-Fi. If you don't want to eat up too much data, you'll want to upload only when connected to Wi-Fi.

  1. Launch YouTube from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the top right of your screen. It's the three vertical dots.
  3. Tap Settings.

    Launch YouTube, tap the more button, tap Settings

  4. Tap General.
  5. Tap Uploads.
  6. Tap either Only when on Wi-Fi or On any network.

    Tap General, tap Uploads, choose a setting

How to limit mobile data usage

  1. Launch YouTube from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the top right of your screen. It's the three vertical dots.
  3. Tap Settings.

    Launch YouTube, tap the more button, tap Settings

  4. Tap General.
  5. Tap the switch next to Limit mobile data usage. When enabled, you'll only be able to stream in HD when connected to Wi-Fi.

    Tap General, tap the switch next to limit mobile data usage

How to manage notifications

  1. Launch YouTube from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the top right of your screen. It's the three vertical dots.
  3. Tap Settings.
  4. Tap Notifications.

    Tap the more button, tap Settings, tap Notifications,

  5. Tap the switch next to each notifications setting you'd like to disable.
  6. Tap Subscriptions: Notify me via.
  7. Tap Push and email, Push only, or Email only.

    Tap the switch next to each setting you'd like to enable/disable, tap Subscriptions: Notify me via, tap an option

How to disable Autoplay

Do you find it ridiculously annoying when you've played a video and the next suggested video starts immediately after? You can turn that off.

  1. Launch YouTube from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the top right of your screen. It's the three vertical dots.
  3. Tap Settings.

    Launch YouTube, tap the more button, tap Settings

  4. Tap General.
  5. Tap the switch next to Autoplay.

    Tap General, tap the switch next to Autoplay

How to enable/disable Restricted Mode

Restricted Mode is a way to filter content that may be deemed inappropriate for children. It can get a little annoying, though, if you enjoy reading the comments, since it hides those by default (because YouTube comments).

  1. Launch YouTube from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the top right of your screen. It's the three vertical dots.
  3. Tap Settings.

    Launch YouTube, tap the more button, tap Settings

  4. Tap General.
  5. Tap the switch next to Restricted Mode to enable/disable it.

    Tap General, tap the switch next to Restricted Mode

How to change content location

You won't be able to view region-locked content, since that has more to do with your Google account and other factors, but you can change what videos might be suggested for you, as well as what ads you see.

  1. Launch YouTube from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the top right of your screen. It's the three vertical dots.
  3. Tap Settings.

    Launch YouTube, tap the more button, tap Settings

  4. Tap General.
  5. Tap Content location.
  6. Tap a region.

    Tap General, tap Content location, tap a region

How to clear your history

You can't really watch anything lewd on YouTube, but if you need to clear your search or watch history, you have the option.

  1. Launch YouTube from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the top right of your screen. It's the three vertical dots.
  3. Tap Settings.

    Launch YouTube, tap the more button, tap Settings

  4. Tap Privacy.
  5. Tap either Clear watch history or Clear search history (or both).
  6. Tap OK when prompted.

    Tap Privacy, tap an option, tap OK

Questions?

Let us know in the comments below!

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2 months ago

Pokémon Go: A beginner's guide

49

Pokémon Go is here and we've got all the details to get you started.

If you haven't already heard, Pokémon Go is already the most popular mobile game of all time. It allows you to wander the world catching adorable pocket-sized monsters and finding awesome new landmarks around your city as you do so. There's a lot going on with this game, but we've put together a guide to get you started.

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2 months ago

Getting 'GPS signal not found' error in Pokémon Go? Here's how to fix it!

89

Don't let GPS errors stop you from playing Pokémon Go!

Pokémon Go is everywhere, and that's great for Android gamers around the world (or at least in the countries the game has launched. But if you're getting a "GPS signal not found" error when you launch the game, here's how to fix it!

GPS errors? First, make sure GPS is enabled!

Many Android phones come with their GPS radios turned off by default in order to save battery life, since the technology is very battery-intensive. Here's how to turn it on.

Note: This example was done on a Samsung Galaxy S7 edge, but these steps should apply to most Android devices running Android 5.0 Lollipop or higher.

  1. Tap on your phone's Settings icon or access Settings through Quick Settings.
  2. Scroll down to Privacy and safety. Tap on it.
  3. Tap on Location.

  4. Make sure Location toggle is in the on position.
  5. Tap on Locating method. This may also be called Location mode.
  6. Tap GPS, Wi-Fi, and mobile networks. This may also be called High accuracy.
  7. Ensure that Wi-Fi is also turned on throughout the game, even if your phone is not connected to a network.

Pokémon Go uses both local Wi-Fi (also known as Assistive GPS), your closest mobile network tower, and GPS satellites to accurately place you in the game world. Turning on just Wi-Fi and mobile network-based location tracking will make your character jump around and less likely to be placed close to Pokémon.

Still getting an error even with GPS enabled?

GPS satellites are finicky things. While the radios inside Android phones have improved significantly over the last few years, they're still not perfect, and may sometimes have trouble locating you, especially indoors.

If you're still getting GPS errors even after turning everything on, take a step outside and hold your phone steady for around 30 seconds. That should allow the GPS satellites to lock onto your phone and get things back to normal.

MORE: Common Pokémon Go problems and how to fix them!

Can you still play the game without GPS?

Yes! If you don't have a phone with GPS, or are using a Wi-Fi tablet that doesn't have a GPS radio, it's still possible to play Pokémon Go. Unfortunately, the experience won't be as good, since you'll need to be in areas that have strong Wi-Fi signals, such as restaurants, bars, coffee shops, or other businesses, that you can connect to. Since Pokémon Go relies on having an internet connection, it will be able to locate you with just a Wi-Fi signal — just don't expect to compete on the same level as your Android phone-wielding friends.

Getting a driving warning when you're not actually driving?

That's a GPS problem! It's called GPS drift and it is usually caused when your phone can't latch onto a strong GPS signal while indoors. The quick fix is to turn on Wi-Fi, or to get close to a window, which will make it easier for a satellite to lock onto your GPS location.

MORE: How to avoid a driving warning in Pokémon Go

Update to the latest version

Are you getting a lot of GPS errors even after following all the steps above? Update to the latest version from the Play Store!

Pokémon Go

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