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3 months ago

Get pumped for the big game with our Super Bowl themes!

5

ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOTBALLLLLLL?????!!!!!!!

The parties are prepped. The commercials are cued. The fans have completely taken Houston — as an Austinite, you can have it, by the by. Super Bowl LI is Sunday, and that means it's time to give the teams their theming due. Only one team may walk outta Texas with a ring, but both teams and their fans can deck their phones in these simple, sporty themes on their Android phones.

So, I say again: are you ready for some football?

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3 months ago

How to mute Google Home's microphones (and why you need to)

25

OK Google, stop listening to me.

I love being able to yell across the room to tell my Google Home to fast forward a song or play the news. But whenever I try to use Google Assistant on my Pixel within earshot of the always-on speaker, the Home almost always intercepts, even if I need something only the Pixel can do, like search my contacts or set a reminder — which Google Home still can't do. Sometimes we need to stop Google Home from butting in, and thankfully, it's really easy to do.

And you don't even have to get off the couch to do it.

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3 months ago

How to replace Shield Android TV remote batteries

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How to replace Shield Android TV remote batteries

When your remote batteries finally die, swapping them out is a quick task.

NVIDIA redesigned its TV-style remote that comes with the new Shield Android TV so it's no longer rechargeable, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. In turn, you get a remote that gets one year of battery life with average use, meaning you don't have to think "is my remote charged?" when you go to turn on your TV.

But after a year of use — or perhaps a bit less if you use it a ton — you'll want to replace the integrated batteries. Thankfully it's a job that only takes a few minutes and will cost you just a couple of dollars once you know the right batteries to buy.

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3 months ago

How to set up GameStream on your NVIDIA Shield TV

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Play your favorite PC games on your Shield TV with GameStream.

The PC vs. console debate has raged on amongst gamers on forums and chatrooms for decades. But it's 2017, and there's more parity between console and PC gaming than ever before. Furthermore, thanks to GameStream for the [NVIDIA Shield Android TV], you can stream your favorite PC games straight from your computer to your living room TV and play from the comfort of your couch with your Shield controller in hand.

There are over 200 titles compatible with GameStream, so you're bound to find some of your favorite PC games to play on your Shield. Do note that your PC will be inaccessible while streaming games to the Shield, an important thing to note if you share your PC with your family or roommates.

See the NVIDIA Shield TV at Amazon

But before we go any further, here's what you'll need to get things set up:

To maximize your Wi-Fi strength, you'll want to ensure that your PC is connected to the internet via a wired ethernet connection so that your Wi-Fi can maintain a strong connection between your Shield and your PC no matter where they are in your home.

Once you've confirmed your PC is compatible, you're ready to get things set up.

  1. On your PC, download and install GeForce Experience.
  2. Log into your NVIDIA account in GeForce Experience. If you have yet to set up an account with NVIDIA, you can create one from scratch, or use your Google or Facebook account.
  3. Check for the latest updates to the GeForce Game Ready driver in GeForce Experience.
  4. Download and install latest updates.
  5. Once the updates have installed, go to the GeForce Experience Settings — the icon looks like a gear.
  6. Select Shield from the side menu.
  7. Ensure that GameStream is turned on.
  8. Switch over to your NVIDIA Shield TV.
  9. Go to GameStream from the main menu.
  10. Log into the same NVIDIA account logged into GeForce Experience.

Now you're PC and NVIDIA Shield are connected and you're good to stream any of the GameStream-supported games that are installed on your PC to the Shield. GeForce Experience will automatically scan your computer for any compatible games installed. When you go to the GameStream menu on your Shield, you should also see Steam as an option, which allows you to stream any games you've got installed on your PC from your Steam library.

Some games may require a keyboard and mouse setup. The NVIDIA Shield TV offers support for both Bluetooth and wired USB keyboards and mice, so you should hopefully be able find something that works around the house. If not, we'd recommend getting the Logitech K400r, which includes a keyboard and trackpad for a great wireless experience in your living room.

Once you've got everything set up, your favorite PC games will load and play just as fast and smoothly as any Android games or apps downloaded onto your Shield TV.

Android Gaming

Best action games for Android

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3 months ago

How to enable lock screen notifications on the Huawei Mate 9

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Here's how to add app notifications to the Huawei Mate 9 lock screen and fix one of the phone's biggest out-of-the-box issues.

I really like the Huawei Mate 9. It's a great phone with a lot of things going for it. But one of the things that, by default, is missing from the phone is lock screen notifications — those incredibly useful cards that let you know, when you turn on the display, what's coming through.

By default, most apps have their notifications disabled in EMUI 5.0, as Huawei aims to keep the lock screen clean and to force people to unlock their device to see exactly what's happening with their notifications. If you want to change that, and I suggest you do, you'll need to enable lock screen notifications manually for each app you want to see.

Here's how to do it.

How to enable lock screen notifications on the Huawei Mate 9

  1. Swipe down on the notification shade from the home screen.
  2. Tap on the Settings icon.
  3. Scroll down and tap on Apps.

     Swipe down to reveal the notification shade, tap the settings button, tap Apps

  4. Select the app you want to change from the list.
  5. Tap on Notifications.
  6. Enable Display on the lock screen.

    Tap the app you want to change, tap notifications, tap Display on the lock screen

That's it! There's one more thing you can do to customize the experience: If you want the notification on the lock screen without the actual information, you can enable the confusingly titled "When locked", right underneath the toggle above to hide the content until the phone is unlocked.

Huawei Mate 9

Jet.com Amazon

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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3 months ago

How do you use your old Android phones or tablets?

86

What are the best ways to repurpose an Android device?

There's a great thread going on right now on Reddit asking people to sum up how they use their old Android phones and tablets.

From security cameras to timelapse builders to permanent media servers, there are a lot of ways you can repurpose old Android phones and tablets — especially now as they are not going obsolete nearly as quickly.

Some people choose to use old Android phones as personal media players for their kids, as Wi-Fi is pretty ubiquitous and microSD cards can stand in for low storage space. Others use their old phones as dashcams to record potential car accidents or incidents on the road.

The best microSD cards

So how do you use your old Android phones or tablets? Let us know in the comments below!

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3 months ago

How to use adoptable storage on the NVIDIA Shield Android TV

7
How to use adoptable storage on the NVIDIA Shield Android TV

Few people think about the amoung of internal storage in their set top box — that is, until they run out of space.

So much of our content is streamed today rather than downloaded for offline playback, and for a majority of people that means the 16GB of internal storage on the Shield Android TV is actually sufficeint. For those who know from the get-go that they'll need a lot of storage, the Shield Pro with its 500GB hard drive is there for an extra $100 at the start. But most people will want to add storage to their box later, and that's where adoptable storage comes in.

Adoptable storage, which was introduced in Android 6.0 Marshmallow, gives users the power to plug in any storage device over USB and have the system recognize it as a continuous piece of storage indisinguishable from the memory soldered to the board internally. It's a critical feature that so many people can benefit from, and we're going to quickly show you how to use it on the Shield Android TV.

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3 months ago

How does Google keep me safe while using Chrome?

12

What Google does to keep you safer and let you know they're doing it in Chrome.

You've probably heard that the Chrome browser helps make sure you don't visit websites that may be harmful on accident. That's true, but like most things in Chrome, there's also more information available for every web page you visit when it comes to trust. It's actually right there in front of us all the time right in the omnibar. Let's have a basic look at what Google does to make sure your safe on the web when using Chrome.

Every website is given a trust rating by Google. There are based on what's called a certificate and data collected by Google's Safe Browsing program. Google's Safe Browsing is an index of the web (yes, all of the web) that will warn you before you load a site that may be unsafe by pausing the loading of the page and warning you. You'll see some information that tells you what Google thinks is wrong and the option to continue to the page or to go back a step to the last page you visited.

We blocked the website address in this image to make sure nobody tries to visit it, but you would normally see it in the text. Any web page that Google's Safe Browsing engine suspects of having malware or collecting your user data will be flagged this way. Safe Browsing is built into Chrome, Firefox and Safari. Safe Browsing isn't something that was made to compete in any sales market. It's a service from Google's web security team that other companies can use and help make better so we're all safer on the internet.

Safe Browsing stops you from going directly to a web site that Google has flagged as harmful.

Chrome also has another safety check in place that uses a site's SSL certificate. A certificate is a small data file that is uploaded on a website's server that binds a cryptography key to that particular site. When a proper certificate is installed on a server, it activates the HTTPS protocol so secure connections between the web server and you are possible. This way, things like credit card transactions, personal details, and data transfers stay between you and the site you're visiting. A certificate also ties a site's domain name, hostname, company name, and location together.

Google has a list of companies that provide these SSL certificates who are trusted. Anyone can create an SSL certificate, and if you work for a company with a big intranet (web pages for internal use) or that uses their own VPN credentials you probably have a custom certificate from your IT department you need to mark as trusted in some applications. Those don't go into Google's master list but are treated the same way because you (or your IT department) explicitly said they were trustworthy.

Using the SSL certificate (or lack of) Chrome will give a website one of four ratings.

  • Secure. This web page is using a valid SSL certificate and all the data going back and forth is only available to you and the server you're visiting.
  • Info. This site isn't using a valid certificate, but there is no reason to suspect any hanky panky is going on. You can click the icon to get the details.
  • Not Secure. There is something wrong with this site's privacy settings and someone else might be able to see the data you're sharing with it.
  • Dangerous. Avoid this site because your private information is at risk. If you didn't disable Safe Browsing you'll get the warning page before you arrive at a site with this rating.

You find these icons in the omnibar (Chrome's version of an address bar) in your browser. You can click on any of them and you'll get all the details Google has about the site as well as links that might help explain what you're seeing.

SSL certificates are becoming more and more necessary and common. You'll find that most companies with a big online presence use them. But you also might need to make sure you're using the right URL to get there!

Android Central is an example. We have a recognized SSL certificate, and you'll be able to use it with Chrome if you visit https://www.androidcentral.com. You'll see the lock icon along with our company name in Chrome's omnibar and that means that everything you type or otherwise enter on one of our pages is encrypted so that only you and we can read it.

SSL certificates are a great way to make sure the data you send to any web page is encrypted and secure.

But we also need to be legacy compatible. We want someone with an old Android tablet or one they bought that doesn't have Google's software available to be able to visit using a browser that can't use certificates or might have difficulty rendering sites that have them. If you visit http://www.androidcentral.com (notice the use of http versus https) you'll see the info icon. You can click on that icon and it will tell you that your connection isn't secured.

Many sites are this way, so be sure to update all your bookmarks to use the https address!

Chrome isn't the only browser that helps make sure you're safe on the web. Microsoft, Mozilla, Apple and everyone else wants your experience to be the best it can be so you keep using their products. But Chrome gives plenty of details to help you know what's going on and we want to make sure you know how to find them.

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3 months ago

How to set up your Shield Android TV to control your TV, receiver or soundbar

4
How to set up your Shield Android TV to control your TV and receiver

It would be great if all of your entertainment devices just worked together, wouldn't it?

The new NVIDIA Shield Android TV is stepping up to the plate as a more complete entertainment solution, and part of that process is playing nice with more of the various devices around it. To that point, the new versions of the Shield Controller and Shield Remote that ship with the new box have integrated IR blasters so they can control your TV and receiver, acting in effect as simple semi-universal remotes.

With a little bit of configuration, you can easily use just the Shield Android TV's controller or remote to turn on your TV and receiver right alongside the box itself, and then control the volume of the receiver instead of just adjusting the Shield's own volume. While it won't work for every entertainment center setup, it could be just the fit for you. Here's how to get it done.

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3 months ago

Introducing Ask Jerry, the dopest place to get your questions answered!

32

You asked for Ask Jerry, and here it is!

We're very lucky to have Jerry Hildenbrand as part of Android Central. He's smart, foul-mouthed and oh-so-intelligent, and he's now yours for the questioning.

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3 months ago

Google Home app for Android: Everything you need to know

7

The Google Home app is for more than the speaker.

Google's eponymous app controls Google Home and Chromecast devices, and opens up new worlds of content for both. Whether you need to set up a new Chromecast, refine your Google Home actions, or just need to find something to cast, Google Home has got you covered.

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3 months ago

Common Moto G4 and G4 Plus problems and how to fix them

85

Facing issues with your Moto G4 or G4 Plus? Here are the most common problems, and how to fix them.

The Moto G series epitomizes the budget segment, and the Moto G4 and G4 Plus build on that tradition by offering great features at an affordable price. Both phones have been in the market for over six months, and have their share of problems — both hardware and software. Some have been addressed with software updates, with the recent Nougat update increasing battery life and fixing several bugs, and there are others you can fix yourself.

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3 months ago

How to store downloaded Netflix content on a microSD card

6

How do I store my offline Netflix content to a microSD card?

Netflix has just been updated with the ability to download offline content onto a microSD card. It's awesome! This comes after the app was updated to support offline content in the first place.

There are a couple of stipulations, of course: not every device supports the new feature, and you can only store the content that can actually be saved offline in the first place, which is a small percentage of Netflix's total catalogue.

Still, if you're running an older Android device, or one with nearly-full storage, this is a game-changer. Here's how to do it.

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3 months ago

How to change the Amazon Echo 'wake word' using Alexa app

7

How can I address my Echo as "Computer"? Just follow these steps!

There's a new way to address your Amazon Echo, and it's about as fun as wearing Combadge — only with fewer stares in public. Amazon has updated the Echo and Echo Dot to respond to the wake word "Computer," instead "Alexa" or "Echo," and it's easy to change. Here's how to do it!

See at Amazon

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3 months ago

International data: How AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint and Project Fi compare

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International data overseas

Roaming outside the U.S. has improved dramatically — but not every carrier handles it the same.​

The editors here at Android Central tend to travel a lot for this job, and that isn't limited to staying in our home country. When we travel, we need to have our phones with us and connected all the time — that's kind of what we do. We're no strangers to dealing with roaming internationally, and thankfully for us the U.S. carriers are getting on board with everyone's tendency to get out of the country and see the world with their phones and tablets at their side.

Gone are the days of astronomical pay-per-megabyte rates, limited roaming carrier agreements and poor options from some of the carriers. Two of the big four carriers are now offering some sort of free international roaming, with the other two coming around to friendlier pricing structures and fewer restrictions on how we use our data we bought. Even prepaid carriers are getting in on the action with some international calling plans.

Even with all of these changes, international data still isn't cheap. Your best bet is to find a local prepaid SIM card when you travel and pop it in your unlocked phone. But that's not always easy — and there's really something luxurious about stepping off a plane, firing up your phone ... and seeing it just work.

So we've gathered up the international data rates and policies for the four major U.S. carriers — Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint — plus Google's own Project Fi. Each carrier does things slightly different, whether it's buying data ahead of time, loading up full-speed data passes once you're already gone or setting up a monthly roaming add-on.

Here's how each of the carriers handles international roaming.

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