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23 hours ago

Mint SIM vs. MetroPCS: Which is better for you?

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How does Mint SIM stack up against MetroPCS? Here's our comparison!

Mint SIM and MetroPCS are both mobile virtual network operators — MVNOs for short. They're known as alternative carriers, offering consumers choices beyond the Big Four (AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint).

Switching to an MVNO can save you money because they simply lease coverage from one of the larger networks and resell it to customers. Plans are often prepaid, so you don't have to worry about overages.

Let's take a look at two major players — Mint SIM and MetroPCS — and see how they compare to one another.

Mint SIM background

Who owns it? Ultra Mobile

Which network does it use? T-Mobile 4G LTE

How long has it been around? Since 2016

Tethering allowed? No

Cheapest plan: $35 for 1 month: 2GB 4G LTE, unlimited nationwide talk, text, and 2G data

MetroPCS background

Who owns it? T-Mobile

Which network does it use? T-Mobile 4G LTE

How long has it been around? Since 1994 (originally as General Wireless). Merged with T-Mobile in 2012.

Tethering allowed? Yes, on all but the $50 unlimited data plan

Cheapest plan: $30/month: 1GB 4G LTE, unlimited talk, text, and 2G data


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Mint SIM plans

Mint SIM doesn't operate with traditional contracts. You pay upfront for your term, which can be 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, or 12 months, with "buying in bulk" saving you more money in the long run. All plans include unlimited nationwide talk, text, and data, though you only get so much 4G LTE per month. Unlimited international texting is included in all plans.

Duration Small (2GB LTE) Medium (5GB LTE) Large (10GB LTE) 1 month $35 $50 $60 3 months $69 ($23/month) $99 ($33/month) $119 ($39.67/month) 6 months $119 ($19.83/month) $169 ($28.17/month) $209 ($34.83/month) 12 months $199 ($16.58/month) $299 ($24.92/month) $399 ($33.25/month)

Add-ons

As far as add-ons are concerned, Mint SIM's selection is very slim:

Extra data:

  • 1GB/month: $10
  • 3GB/month: $20

International credit:

Mint SIM's plans contain no international calling, though unlimited international texting is included. You can add international calling credit to your account in $5, $10, or $20 increments.

You can see a list of international rates here.

MetroPCS plans

All MetroPCS plans include unlimited talk, text, and data, and its website features a data calculator to help you find a plan that fits your specific needs based on your estimated usage. There are no annual contracts with MetroPCS; you pay on a month-to-month basis.

Monthly data 1GB LTE 3GB LTE Unlimited LTE Data Unlimited LTE Data (plus 8GB hotspot) Price (monthly) $30 $40 $50 $60 Extras N/A Music Unlimited Music Unlimited Music Unlimited

Plan Features

All plans from MetroPCS feature no annual contracts, with all taxes or regulatory fees included in the price. Voicemail and visual voicemail are included with each plan, along with Caller ID, Call Waiting and 3-way calling.

Music Unlimited is included on $40 and higher rate plans, which lets you stream from 40+ streaming music services including Apple Music, Pandora, iHeartRadio, Napster, Spotify, and more without it counting against your monthly high-speed data allotment.

4G LTE Mobile Hotspot is included in all plans except for the $50 unlimited plan.


Additional Services

Napster Unlimited Music

For $10 a month, you get unlimited, ad-free access to the Napster app, which allows you to download and play your favorite music for offline listening or stream online. There are ad-free artist radio channels to choose from as well as live radio options available There are millions of songs available to be downloaded.

Mexico Unlimited

Do you have friends or family living in Mexico? Do you often vacation south of the border? For only $5 a month, you can add Mexico Unlimited to your plan and get unlimited calling to and from Mexico to mobile phones and landlines, unlimited data in Mexico just as you would receive in the U.S. (based on your $40, $50, or $60 base rate plan), as well as unlimited text messages, sending and receiving, while in Mexico.

Canada Unlimited

Essentially the same as Mexico Unlimited, except for our pals to the North. For $5 a month, you get unlimited calling to and from Canada (including mobile phones and landlines), unlimited data while in Canada (high-speed data based on your $40, $50, or $60 base rate plan), as well as unlimited text messaging while in Canada.

Value Bundle of Features

For just $5 a month, you can add five features to your account to make life easier. They include:

  • Name ID: Blocks calls from unwanted, restricted, anonymous, private or unknown parties. Also includes Reverse Number Lookup and Real Time Caller ID.
  • International Text Messaging: Send text messages across the globe. Find the full list of countries here.
  • Voicemail to Text: Converts your voicemails to texts and delivers them straight to your phone
  • Call Forwarding: Allows you to forward calls to any local number. Call Forwarding is easy to setup and use for those times when it might come in handy.
  • Unlimited Directory Assistance: Unlimited calls to directory assistance for business and residential listings in the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico.

The Premium Handset Protection Program

For an added $6 a month, Premium Handset Protection covers your device against loss, theft, damage and out-of-warranty malfunction. Includes access to Lookout Mobile Security Premium, which helps keep your device secure by backing up your data including your contacts, photos and call history, and will also send you an email alert if they suspect your phone has been stolen.

Premium Handset Protection can only be added on the day of activation.

Best phones available from MetroPCS

You can bring an unlocked phone to MetroPCS; just check compatibility first. If you don't have a phone to bring, we recommend the following:

  • Samsung Galaxy S7: $549 (after offers)
  • iPhone 7 32GB: $649
  • iPhone 7 128GB: $749
  • iPhone 7 Plus 32GB: $769
  • iPhone 7 Plus: 128GB: $869
  • Samsung Galaxy S6: $299

Which should I go with? Mint SIM

Both Mint SIM and MetroPCS use T-Mobile's network, so deciding which to go with will really depend on how much data you expect to use, and the extra features available from MetroPCS.

From a purely price-conscious perspective, Mint SIM is the better option, especially if you have an unlocked phone of your own. So long as you sign up for three months or longer at a time, you get a lot more data for your money even when compared to the MetroPCS unlimited plans. 5GB to 10GB of data a month is probably going to be more than plenty for the average person.

However, if you frequently travel to Canada and/or Mexico, then MetroPCS offers the better deal with its Canada Unlimited and Mexico Unlimited deals. Getting unlimited calling and texting, as well as being able to use your base rate data while out of country is a huge plus that simply isn't available with Mint SIM.

Alternative carriers (MVNOS)

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1 day ago

If you're buying Rogue One, make sure to connect Disney Movies Anywhere

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Most digital copies are a letdown. Disney's are not.

We've all seen it: buy the movie before it's out on Blu-ray, and you don't get any special features, and your copy is stuck in one store forever. It sucks, right? WRONG! Disney has a digital system that makes buying the movie early an actually tempting thing to do, and it all has to do with connecting digital stores and awesome app implementation.

Before you go download Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, please take our advice and download Disney Movies Anywhere.

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1 day ago

How to install RetroPie on Raspberry Pi

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Making your own arcade is a lot easier than you think.

The Raspberry Pi is an amazing little computer. Ultra cheap and well supported, it's perfect for all sorts of projects like running Kodi or Playing games.

It's also a killer little emulation station that you can play a ton of throwback console ROMs on, and there's a custom operating system that makes doing it a lot easier than you think.

Let's get RetroPie installed on your Raspberry Pi!

What you'll need to get set up

You'll need a Raspberry Pi (natch) and everything required to connect it to a monitor and running any operating system. Here's the list:

  • A power supply
  • SD card
  • An enclosure
  • HDMI cable

You can easily source these parts online or from a well-stocked hobby shop or even Radio Shack, but the easy way to make sure you have everything you need is to buy a kit with all this stuff in it.

We think the CanaKit Starter Kit is your best bet based on price, completeness, and quality of parts.

See CanaKit at Amazon

You are also gonna need a controller. RetroPie works just fine with a PS3 controller, PS4 controller or Xbox 360 controller through a USB cable. But it also works with most USB controllers designed for a PC, including old school Nintendo copies. That's awesome because NES ROM files are small and NES emulators for the Raspberry Pi work really well. That means the controller is perfect for the game and the buttons are right where you remember them. That's pretty important and you realize it as soon as you start to play a game with the "wrong" controller.

Anyhoo, NES knockoff controllers with a USB connection are cheap at Amazon. Including one built specifically for what we're about to do!

See RetroLink controller at Amazon

Now all you need is a screen to play your games on and some ROM files. You can use any screen with an HDMI input and it just works. We'll let you source the ROM files yourself, but remember that some older games are still copyrighted and you can't just grab one from a website without paying or you are violating that copyright.

The software

Make sure you pick the right file for your Raspberry Pi. If you bought the CanaKit, you have a Raspberry Pi 3.

You need two things from the Internet: the RetroPie operating system, and a utility to create a bootable file system on the SD card you'll be using. You'll also need a computer running Windows, Mac OS, or Linux to flash the operating system to the card. This sounds complicated, but it's not. You don't need to be any sort of tech guru for this.

Fire up the computer and browse to the RetroPie website. On the Downloads page, you'll find a button to download RetroPie for the Raspberry Pi 0 or 1, and a download button for the Raspberry Pi 2 or 3. Make sure you pick the right file for your Raspberry Pi. If you bought the CanaKit, you have a Raspberry Pi 3. If you bought a different one, you'll find the version printed in white ink right on the top of the circuit board.

Download RetroPie

Now you need a program to flash RetroPie to the SD card. You need to do this the right way so your Raspberry Pi can read it from the card and boot up. The best and easiest way is to download Etcher. It's available for Windows, Mac or Linux and it's dead simple to use. Unless you already have a program you use to flash Raspberry Pi images, trust us. Just download Etcher and install it.

Download Etcher

Plug your SD card into your computer and start flashing.

The setup

Open the file explorer on your computer and triple check what drive the SD card you're going to flash is. If you tell Etcher to use the wrong drive, it can erase the stuff on your computer. Write it down if you have to, because we'll need it here in a sec.

  • Unzip the RetroPie image you downloaded and put it somewhere on your computer.
  • Open the Etcher program and click the first button that says Select Image.
  • Pick the RetroPie image you downloaded and press OK.
  • Pick your SD card with the middle button (if it's not showing the right one, click it then double check it then triple check it).
  • Click the button that says Flash! and let it do its thing.

It's going to take a few minutes — the bigger the SD card the longer it takes. Figure about three to five minutes for a typical PC. Don't interrupt it because it will tell you when it's finished. When it's done, stick the SD card in the slot on your Raspberry Pi.

Grab your controller and plug it in. If you're using an Ethernet cable with your Pi you don't need a keyboard, but if you're going to use Wi-Fi you need one to enter your Wi-Fi password. Any USB keyboard will work even a wireless one with a little dongle like this cool one from Logitech. You can just grab the one from the computer you used to copy the OS and you're good to go. Next plug the HDMI cable in, then plug the cord in.

While it's booting you see a bunch of text on a black screen and that's normal. Don't worry, it automatically boots up to an easy graphical interface when it's done. The first boot might take a couple minutes because it's setting a few things up. When it's done you'll see the screen to set up your controller. That's why we needed it plugged in right away.

This is easy. Press any button and hold it until you see a configuration menu. Then follow the prompts and push the button it tells you to push as it goes through the list. If you come to a button your controller doesn't have, just press any button and hold it to skip it. Once you've told it which buttons are which, it boots to the RetroPie desktop and you can use your controller to navigate and the action button (A on the NES controller) to "click" things.

At this point, you're done. RetroPie is installed and you can run ROM files through the various emulators available, which is pretty much all of them (here's a list). But one more thing makes using it so much easier.

One more thing

  • On the RetroPie Desktop, press the Start button if you don't see a list of things you can do.
  • Choose Wi-Fi from the list and enter your Wi-Fi network info when it asks you (use the Tab key on your keyboard to get your cursor in the box).
  • Go back to the options page and choose RetroPie Setup from the list.
  • Choose Manage Packages from the next list.
  • Choose Manage Experimental Packages from the next list.

You'll come to a list of applications you can install. They're called Packages because RetroPie is a front-end for Debian Linux and it uses a package manager to add or remove programs. The package we're looking for is called RetroPie-Manager and it's near the very end of the list. When you see it, go ahead and choose it, then choose to Install from source and let it do its thing. This will only take a minute (seriously, just a minute or so).

When it's done installing, you'll see configuration / options on the list now. Choose it, then pick Enable RetroPie-Manager on boot so that it starts up every time you boot up the Raspberry Pi. Go ahead and reboot now by pressing the Start button to open a control window.

  • When it's done, go back the Desktop list and choose Show IP to find out your RetroPie's IP address (that's the number that identifies it on your Wi-Fi network). It's the very first thing you see in the information box that opens. Go ahead and write those numbers down. There will be four sets of numbers, something like 192.168.8.26.
  • Go back to the computer you used to flash the operating system and open the web browser. Don't forget your keyboard!
  • In the browser, enter the four sets of numbers followed by a colon and the number 8000. It will look like this: 192.168.8.26:8000. Press enter and be ready for something really cool.

RetroPie Manager is running on your Raspberry Pi but is controlled from a web browser on any computer on your Wi-Fi network. It can show you things like how much free space you have or what the clock speeds of the CPUs in your Raspberry Pi are or even the temperature. Go ahead and check out all the options. What we're interested in are the Manage BIOS and Manage ROM settings. You can use them to install a ROM or new emulator directly to your Raspberry Pi through the web browser!

Click the Manage ROM files button and choose what type of file you're going to install. Then drag the ROM file right into the window and it does the rest by itself. There is no need to pull out the SD card and copy files to the right folder or type a bunch of text at the command line to download them using RetroPie's interface. Go ahead and drag a ROM over to try it.

When it's done, just close the browser window. Back at your Raspberry Pi, you need to reboot. Do it through the control window just like you did a few steps back. That's always how you shut things down safely. When it boots back up you'll see the Emulation Station program running and the emulator you uploaded a ROM for is now the beginning of a list. As you add more ROMs for other emulators the list will grow. It's dynamic and only shows emulators you have ROM files for. You know what to do, choose it and click.

Pick the ROM you just uploaded and click on it, then have a bunch of old school fun!

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1 day ago

Super Mario Run for Android: Everything you need to know

0

Super Mario has finally arrived on Android! Here we go!

After a long wait, Super Mario Run is finally available for Android from the Google Play Store. It's Nintendo's second game released for Android after Fire Emblem Heroes and its third official app after Miitomo. It's essentially Nintendo's take on the endless runner genre on mobile, featuring Mario and all his pals.

Super Mario Run is a free download. You can play through the entire first world — boss level included — in World Tour mode for free before you need to shell out $9.99 to unlock the rest of the game. There are three ways to play the game: World Tour, Toad Rally, and kingdom building. You're required to kind of cycle through all three modes as you play in order to progress in each one: you need to beat World Tour levels to unlock new levels for Toad Rally, and you need to succeed at Toad Rally to impress Toads and build up your kingdom.

But first and foremost, you need to master the core gameplay.

How do I get started?

When you open the game for the first time, you'll be asked to select a region; after this, you'll be asked to link your My Nintendo account, if you have one. We suggest signing up for My Nintendo if you don't already have an account: It unlocks some free in-game content, most notably Toad as a playable character. You can also sign up with Twitter or Facebook. After you've signed up and agreed to the Terms and Conditions, you're ready to play!

Signing up for a My Nintendo account unlocks Toad as a playable character.

From there, the game runs you through the tutorial level, where you learn the basics of how to control Mario and how the game mechanics work. Everything is shown to you step by step, so even though you know you tap to jump, you must wait until it teaches you how to jump in the tutorial. All told, the tutorial takes under a minute to complete before we're thrown into the main story of the game

(Spoiler alert: it involves King Bowser kidnapping Princess Peach).

What are the controls?

The first thing you need to know: Mario runs automatically. You don't have to — nor do you get to — manually direct him forwards or backwards. He also automatically jumps over small obstacles like blocks or enemies, small gaps in the path, and low-height Warp Pipes.

But just because Mario automatically jumps over enemies and most obstacles doesn't mean he's invincible. Mario can still get injured or die if you're not strategic with your jumps. However, Super Mario Run uses the same bubble save that was introduced in New Super Mario Bros.. You start each level with two bubbles giving you three 'lives', as it were.

How to jump manually

Just because Mario automatically runs and jumps over small enemies and obstacles doesn't mean this game's a sleeper. You certainly need to master all the ways you can control Mario's jumps yourself to stomp enemies, hit blocks, collect coins, and get to out-of-reach areas:

  • To jump normally, tap the screen
  • To get a high jump, press and hold your finger on the screen
  • To spin in mid-air, touch and hold your finger on the screen, and then tap the screen while in mid-air
  • To reverse jump off a wall, tap when Mario is about to hit a wall
  • To stall in mid-air, touch the screen and swipe to the left. One to master for grabbing challenge coins.
  • To do a vaulting jump, tap when Mario is vaulting over an enemy. This also lets you stomp the enemy.

More stylish jumps will also impress more toads during Toad Rally challenges. Those include linking consecutive wall jumps, vaulting jumps, rolling jumps, climbing jumps, and stomping consecutive enemies.

What do the action objects do?

Pause Blocks stop Mario. When you step on one, Mario stops moving, the screen catches up, and the game timer pauses, allowing you to time to determine when and where you want to move next. These often show up when you have a couple of options to choose from: Should you jump to the higher platform or stay on the lower level? When you've made your decision, tap the screen to start moving again.

Launch Blocks launch Mario in the direction shown on the block's arrow. Simply running across a launch block does nothing; to trigger it, you'll have to tap the screen as you cross it. If you tap on a reverse Launch Block, Mario will jump backwards.

Coin Arrows are transparent blocks that reveal coin paths once Mario touches them. These often point you along the preferred path, and can also help you maximize your coin collection in Toad Rally.

Springboards catapult Mario in a specific direction through the air. This can be useful for climbing walls and getting to out-of-reach places.

Red Rings make red coins appear. Red coins are special high-value coins that only appear for a limited amount of time — usually about five seconds. Make sure to run through a Red Ring whenever you see one!

Super Stars will turn you into an invincible coin-collecting machine. They are hidden amongst bricks (usually ones that are hard to reach), so be sure to jump into bricks to smash them! The Super Star power-up acts as a magnet, drawing coins toward you as you run: Big time fun.

Switches control hidden blocks: Some levels have blocks that only appear when you jump on a switch. These will help you reach greater heights, avoid death, and collect Challenge Coins, but be careful! The platforms will expire, so you'll need to hurry or else they might disappear beneath you.

P Switches turn blocks into blue coins for a limited period of time. Jump on a blue P Switch to snap up as many blue coins as you can before they disappear.

Time Extenders add a few extra seconds on the clock. Time Extenders are invaluable on some levels, so be sure to grab one whenever you see it.

What about Boss Battles?

At the end of each world, you'll have to face off against a boss. First, you'll have to complete a level run in a castle or an airship, but instead of finishing the level by grabbing a flagpole, you'll meet up with a Big Boss like Bowser or Boom Boom.

Each has slightly different weaknesses, and you'll have to use your smarts and skills to defeat each one. If you've played previous Mario titles, you should know what to do, but if you need a few hints:

  • Bowser can be defeated when you drop an axe onto the bridge he is standing on.

  • Boom Boom needs a little head-bouncing finesse.

  • Make sure your character is fully powered up before entering a boss battle. That way, you have a little wiggle-room when it comes to making mistakes. After all, it ain't easy to jump over Bowser's spike shell.

  • After defeating the boss, you'll unlock the next world.

What is Toad Rally mode?

Toad Rally is the multiplayer mode in Super Mario Run. You compete against other players online in a head-to-head competition of speed, accuracy, and style. You race against a ghost version of your opponent while each of you play through a level. The number of coins you gather and fancy jumps you pull off during the race determines who wins the round.

As you complete worlds in the World Tour, you unlock new color of Toads. For example, you'll unlock blue Toads once you complete World 1, purple when you complete World 2 and so on. You need to collect certain colors of toads to unlock new characters, so pay attention to what toads are up for grab in each rally.

If you win a rally, you'll convince Toads to join your kingdom — but if you lose, a certain number of them will leave.

Perform trick jumps to impress Toads

The more stylish you are during Toad Rally, the more Toads you'll impress. You'll know if you're gaining Toads by the thumbs up icon that will flash on the screen every time you do a stylish jump such as a rolling jump, linking consecutive wall jumps, or by vault jumping past enemies. If you're really impressing the Toads, you may see some of them populate the bottom of your screen as your audience.

But be careful, because if you die you'll lose your Toad fans. How many Toads you impress during the run will factor into your final score, so if it's an especially tight coin collecting race it might just come down to who impressed the most Toads. Since all these Toad Rally runs occur on levels you've unlocked during the World Tour, you will want to remember your best lines and any secret areas with oodles of coins so you can get the upper hand on your opponent.

Coin Rush

As you collect coins through the level, you fill up your Coin Rush meter. Once it's full, you unleash a coin-collecting frenzy, with coins shooting out of any nearby pipes and Coin Arrows doubled for the duration of the bonus. You can fill the Coin Rush meter by collecting coins (including Challenge Coins) and pulling off sweet tricks as you go.

What about kingdom building?

The final aspect of the game is building up your Mushroom Kingdom. All the coins you collect in Super Mario Run can be used to build and deck out your kingdom with mini-games, decorations and other bonus objects. You buy buildings and decorations from the shop (or unlock them as gifts from the Gift Box) and then place them in designated spots on your land.

You can place up to eight buildings and 12 decorations to your kingdom to start, although there will be opportunities to expand your Kingdom as you collect more toads and level up your Kingdom.

Castle mini-games

One of the coolest things you can add to your Kingdom is mini-game huts. You buy these special bonus buildings from the shop, which in turn let you play bonus games once every eight hours. Bonus houses are a quick way to earn coins and Toad Rally tickets.

How can I unlock the other characters?

There are 10 unlockable characters in Super Mario Run: Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Toad, Toadette, and five different Yoshi (the classic green Yoshi we all know and love, along with red, yellow, purple, and blue). Besides Mario, each character can be unlocked by completing a task, or by reaching a certain number of Toads in your kingdom. For example, you unlock Toad by connecting your Nintendo account within the app, Princess Peach is unlocked by beating the World Tour levels, while Luigi and the Yoshis are unlocked by collecting specific Toads in the Toad Rally.

Each character has a special ability: Luigi can jump higher than any other character, Princess Peach can float a la Super Mario Bros. 2, Toad can run faster than all other characters, and Yoshi has his flailing floating jump that you may remember best from Super Smash Bros..

Any other questions?

Super Mario Run is ultimately all about mastering each level. There are three different sets of Challenge Coins to collect, and you're constantly replaying the same levels in Toad Rally as you lure Toads to your Kingdom and collect coins. After a couple of hours playing through the game you should be well on your way to mastering the controls.

Got any questions, comments or tips to share? let us know in the comments!

Android Gaming

Best action games for Android

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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1 day ago

Android Theming: the ultimate guide

10

Life's too short for an ugly, cluttered home screen.

Android is a system with a singular opportunity to shape our launcher and home screen experience in almost countless ways into what we want. Want to cover your home screens in app icons and make it look like an iPhone? Knock yourself out! Want your desktop to party like it's 1999 with a home screen like Windows 98? Rock on! Just want to make your phone look presentable so you can find your apps without digging through pages and pages of nonsense? We're here to help you!

Whether you want to tweak everything down to the dirtiest details in your folder icon colors or you just want to find a better way to organize your home screen, we're here to help guide you through whatever you want to do with your launcher… or a new launcher.

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2 days ago

How to get the N7 armor in Mass Effect: Andromeda

14

Because how your armor looks is more important than how well it protects you.

There's a lot of stuff to do in Mass Effect: Andromeda and mixed in are plenty of nods back to the original trilogy. One of them is the N7 armor that you can unlock and craft in the game.

It's pretty easy to do and doesn't require any tough missions or super rare materials. You can also do it early and it makes for a great armor to wear while you're working on unlocking those god-tier items. Here's how to look like Commander Shepard, at least while your helmet is on.

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Warning: Spoilers ahead

You'll need to find a research station. There are two that are easy to find if they're something you haven't come across just yet. The easiest one to find is on your ship, the Tempest. But you also get steered right to one if you play the campaign on the first planetary outpost you'll likely come across on Eos during the "A Better Beginning" mission.

After you power up the generators and lay waste to the first batch of kett, you'll be able to search the buildings of the deserted colony and one of the points of interest on your compass is a research station and some resources to use with it. When you first find it, you probably won't have the resources to unlock and craft the armor, so remember where it is because you'll be going back to Eos for some side missions shortly. But you can still look at the N7 armor and see what you'll need to craft it — best of all, everything can be bought from the Nexus.

  • Approach the research station and choose research
  • Make sure you're looking at Milky Way Technology
  • Choose the Armor folder

Scroll through the choices and you'll find four pieces of N7 armor: chest, legs, arms and helmet. You'll have to unlock the blueprints for each piece with research points, the chest needs 100 points and the other pieces need 50 each. You should have around 150 to 200 points just from playing through the first missions, and the rest are pretty easy to get right on Eos. Just hit all the buildings and scan everything you can find and be sure to scan the corpses from your encounter with the kett.

After you've unlocked the blueprints you can build each piece by choosing the development screen from a research station. You only need common materials and I bought everything I needed on the Nexus or the Tempest from the vendor. If you can't find the platinum, you can either save and restart until it's there or go to the planets and deploy some mining probes. Don't worry, it's not too hard to find, and everything else is super common and always in stock.

After you get all the pieces built, head to your cabin on the Tempest and visit your wardrobe. Here's where you can choose the colors to finish that OG Cmdr Shepard look. The colors you want to choose:

  • Color One: Grey
  • Color Two: Black
  • Color Three: Black
  • Pattern Select: 1.00
  • Pattern Color: Red

While this isn't the best armor in the game, it's one of the coolest just because of the nostalgia factor. You might as well look good while you're playing!

PlayStation 4

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2 days ago

How to set up Plex Media Server on your NVIDIA Shield TV

19

Turn your Shield TV into a Plex Server is both easy and convenient!

When it comes to the centralization of your media in one place, nothing does it better than Plex. It's a very versatile and user-friendly application that lets you stream all your media to any device with the Plex app installed.

Best of all, it comes preinstalled on all NVIDIA Shield TVs, making the Shield a natural choice to set up as your Plex Media Server.

Why the Shield is a natural fit as your Plex Media Server

The NVIDIA Shield is an incredibly powerful Android TV box with support for 4K Ultra HD resolution, hardware acceleration for the top media codecs, and features a great user interface. The Shield Pro, in particular, is an ideal candidate for the Plex Media Server what with the 500GB of onboard storage for all your music, movies, TV shows and photos.

Plex has included the software for setting up a Plex Media Server on your NVIDIA Shield right out of the box and as with pretty much everything involving Plex, setup is intuitive and user-friendly.

See NVIDIA Shield Pro TV on Amazon

Creating an account with Plex

If you've never used Plex before, the first thing you'll need to do is create an account on the Plex website. It's free to set up an account and get the basic functionality from Plex, but you might want to consider going premium for some valuable features including Cloud Sync, which lets you sync your library to a supported cloud storage service so you're able to enjoy all your content even when your Shield is turned off or disconnected from the internet.

Setting up a Plex Media Server on your NVIDIA Shield

First thing you'll need to do is link your Plex account to the Plex app on your Shield. To do so, simply open the Plex app on your NVIDIA Shield and sign into your account. To do so, you simply have to enter the provided code at the Plex Account Link in a web browser. Once you've got your account linked on your Shield, it will instantly start searching for your Plex Media Server — and won't be able to find one unless you've previously set one up on another device.

Don't sweat it, because on the next screen you'll see the option for setting up the Plex Media Server. Setup is a breeze — simply keep tapping Next to enable Plex Media Server, create default libraries for your Media Server, and accept the permissions that Plex requires to do its thing. It will take some time for the Plex Media Server to set up at first, so you'll have to be patient. Once it's set up, you'll be able to view your server's settings by logging into your account at Plex.tv.

The NVIDIA Shield TV Pro has 500GB of internal storage, which makes it the ideal candidate to be your Plex Media Server.

Next, you'll want to load up your Shield with all your favorite media. This is where having the NVIDIA Shield TV Pro comes in real handy, because you'll have 500GB of internal storage to use compared to the 16GB of space on the basic model. The easiest way to transfer files to your Shield is over your local network. Go into your Shield Settings > Storage & reset, and toggle on Over local network under Shield storage access.

It will give you a username and password to connect to your Shield on your computer. Then, simply hop onto your PC or Mac, find your Shield in the shared devices, and start dragging and dropping into the appropriate folder in your Shield's file system.

If you've opted for the 16GB Shield, or simply don't have the space on your Shield to accommodate all the media you want to add, you can always connect a USB drive filled with your media to one of the USB ports on the back of the Shield, or set up a network storage device. Once you've got your media added, you'll want to go to Plex Media Server settings in a web browser and add your media folders as libraries, whether they're stored internally, on a USB, or connected via your network storage device.

Access your media on the go!

Once you've set up your NVIDIA Shield TV as your Plex Media Server, you're able to access all of your media by logging into your Plex account on any other device you own that has the Plex app installed. Your NVIDIA Shield will need to be up and running for remote access, so if you want your file accessible all the time, you'll want to go into the Screensaver settings and set it so your Shield never goes to sleep.

And that's all it takes! You'll probably want to bookmark the Plex Media Server settings so you can quickly add or remove content as needed.

Questions? Thoughts?

Let us know what you think about Plex as a media storage companion on your Shield, and perhaps how it compares to Kodi in your opinion.

NVIDIA Shield Android TV

Amazon

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2 days ago

One Button Nav on the Moto G5 is an exciting new way to interact with your phone

25

The Moto G5 puts the fingerprint sensor to good use.

One of the more interesting features in the Moto G5 and G5 Plus is a new Moto Action called One Button Nav. The feature made its debut on the 5.0-inch Lenovo Z2 Plus last year, and after seeing positive feedback from its user community, Motorola included it in the G5 and G5 Plus.

The feature eschews the on-screen navigation buttons, instead relying on the fingerprint sensor of the G5 and G5 Plus to navigate. A single tap on the sensor takes you to the home screen, a right-to-left swipe takes you back within an app's interface, and a left-to-right swipe reveals the multitasking pane.

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2 days ago

How to fix LG G6 battery life problems

32
How to improve LG G6 battery life

There are several ways to make sure your battery goes the full day, every day.

No matter how good battery life is on a phone, we always want more. The LG G6 manages to do pretty well with its 3300mAh battery, getting most of us through a full day of typical use — but of course, not every day is typical.

Whether it's turning into a regular occurrence for your phone to hit 50% before lunch, or just a here-and-there situation of needing to be sure that you'll have enough battery for well into the night, there are a handful of things you can do to make the most of your LG G6's battery. And now that LG's leading device no longer offers a replaceable battery, these tips may be even more important to know.

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3 days ago

How to manually update your Nexus or Pixel

163
How to manually update your Nexus or Pixel

Get the latest version of Android on your phone on your own terms.

Nexus, the line of Android phones and tablets developed in partnership between Google and various hardware manufacturers, was a program that helps developers to get their hands on a 100% stock Android experience. It can help to develop applications for the platform quicker and easier than using a device with a manufacturer skin onboard, and that's a good thing. Google has discontinued the Nexus line in October 2016 in favor of the Pixel.

The Pixel is Google's attempt at being a company that sells phones and has more control over whats inside them. Think of them as the continuation of the Nexus line in terms of offering a clean software experience handled directly by Google.

These phones aren't just bought by developers. If there's a single reason for consumers to buy a Nexus or Pixel device, it's this: the newest software first. Period.

When Google works on major updates to Android, it's also building them to work specifically on their own devices. This means when Google releases an update to the Android code itself, it will come quickly to these phones first, if not immediately.

And Pixel or Nexus phones actually are among the few that have several ways of receiving updates. Some are easier, some are faster, but all are available to you. Here's how to manually update yours.

This post was last updated in March 2017.

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3 days ago

Where to buy the LG G6 in the U.S.

64
LG G6

The U.S. carriers have kicked off pre-orders for LG's latest ahead of April 7 street date.

Our favorite phone of 2017 so far is now up for pre-order on American shores. The big four U.S. carriers have started taking orders for the LG G6, meaning you can secure yours in time for the April 7 release date. All three are offering a free Google Home, courtesy of LG, if you order your G6 before April 30.

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3 days ago

Google's #MyAndroid Taste Test gives bad results. Here's how to make them better

8

Had a taste of Android theming with the #myAndroid Taste Test?

Android has always been a bastion of customization, but it hasn't exactly been well-advertised, by Google or by the various manufacturers that ship it on their devices. Google is now looking to highlight that flexibility and creativity with its new #myAndroid campaign, looking to showcase how diverse and delightful our home screens can be when we add our own uniqueness to them.

Google has even devised a simple — dare I say cute — Taste Test to help you find some customizations you might like. But how do you use what the quiz spits out?

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4 days ago

Mint SIM vs. Cricket Wireless: Which is better for you?

44

How does Mint SIM stack up against Cricket Wireless? Here's our comparison!

Mint SIM and Cricket Wireless are mobile virtual network operators or MVNOs for short. At the end of the day, they're "alternative carriers", meaning that they're not the Big Four (AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint).

Switching to an MVNO can save you money because they simply lease coverage from one of the larger networks and resell it to customers. Plans are often prepaid, so you don't have to worry about overages.

Let's take a look at two major players — Mint SIM and Cricket Wireless — and see how they compare to one another.

Mint SIM background

Who owns it? Ultra Mobile

Which network does it use? T-Mobile 4G LTE

How long has it been around? Since 2016

Tethering allowed? No

Cheapest plan: $35 for 1 month: 2GB 4G LTE, unlimited nationwide talk, text, and 2G data

Cricket Wireless background

Who owns it? AT&T

Which network does it use? AT&T 4G LTE

How long has it been around? Since 1999

Tethering allowed? Yes, $10/month

Cheapest plan: $30/month: 1GB 4G LTE, unlimited talk, text, and 2G data


Mint SIM plans

Mint SIM doesn't operate with traditional contracts. You pay upfront for your term, which can be 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, or 12 months, with "buying in bulk" saving you more money in the long run. All plans include unlimited nationwide talk, text, and data, though you only get so much 4G LTE per month. Unlimited international texting is included in all plans.

Duration Small (2GB LTE) Medium (5GB LTE) Large (10GB LTE) 1 month $35 $50 $60 3 months $23/month ($69 upfront) $33/month ($99 upfront) $39.67/month ($119 upfront) 6 months $19.83/month ($119 upfront) $28.17/month ($169 upfront) $34.83/month ($209 upfront) 12 months $16.58/month ($199 upfront) $24.92/month ($299 upfront) $33.25/month ($399 upfront)

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Add-ons

As far as add-ons are concerned, Mint SIM's selection is very slim:

Extra data:

  • 1GB/month: $10
  • 3GB/month: $20

International credit:

Mint SIM's plans contain no international calling, though unlimited international texting is included. You can add international calling credit to your account in $5, $10, or $20 increments.

You can see a list of international rates here.

Cricket plans

All Cricket Wireless plans include unlimited talk, text, and data, but your 4G LTE access is metered and you can choose how much you want, per month. There are no annual contracts with Cricket; you pay on a month-to-month basis.

1GB Basic (3GB LTE) Smart (8GB LTE) Unlimited (22GB LTE) Price (monthly) $30 $40 $50 $60 With Auto Pay $25 $35 $45 $55 Extras Eligible for Group Save Discount International texting, roaming in Canada and Mexico, eligible for Group Save Discount International texting, roaming in Canada and Mexico, eligible for Group Save Discount

Add-ons

1GB of 4G LTE data:

$10/month. All remaining data expires at the end of your monthly plan cycle.

Tethering: N/A

Turn your phone into a mobile Wi-Fi hotspot for $10/month. Uses data from your monthly high-speed allowance. Not all phones are compatible, so double-check first.

Cricket Protect:

For $7/month, Cricket protect covers you if your phone is lost, stolen, accidentally damaged physically or by liquid. You're also covered for in-warranty exchanges and out-of-warranty mechanical/electrical problems. Deductibles vary from $10 to $250, depending on your phone model.

Click here for more info.

Deezer free trial:

Get a free trial to the music streaming service. Length of free trial is at least 15 days and depends on when you sign up and when your next monthly bill date falls. After the free trial, it's $6/month.

Terms and conditions

Group Save Discount: Cricket gives you a monthly discount for each line you add to your account. Each line must have a plan of at least $40 a month. Lines with the $30 per month plan are ineligible.

  • 2 lines: $10 monthly discount
  • 3 lines: $20 monthly discount
  • 4 lines: $30 monthly discount
  • 5 lines: $40 monthly discount
  • Up to $100 in total monthly savings

International texting: This only covered text messages to select countries and does not cover picture or video messaging.

Mexico and Canada roaming: Calling and texting while in Mexico and Canada are included, as well as calling between the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. Usage in Canada and Mexico cannot exceed 50% for texts, voice minutes, and data usage sent, received, or used. For example, if you send 100 texts in a month, no more than 50 can be sent to or received from Mexico and Canada.

Best phones available from Cricket Wireless

You can bring an unlocked phone to Cricket Wireless; just check compatibility first. If you don't have a phone to bring, we recommend the following:

  • Samsung Galaxy S7: $649.99
  • iPhone 7 32GB: $649.99
  • iPhone 7 128GB: $749.99
  • iPhone 7 Plus 32GB: $769.99
  • iPhone 7 Plus: 128GB: $869.99
  • Samsung Galaxy S6: $499.99

Which should I go with? Mint SIM

From a purely price-conscious perspective, Mint SIM is the better option, especially if you have an unlocked phone of your own. T-Mobile's network is solid and Mint SIM's plans are straightforward. So long as you sign up for 3 months or longer at a time, you get a lot more data for your money.

If discounted phones and roaming in Canada and Mexico are important to you, then you'll have to go with Cricket (if you're choosing between the two). It just sucks that Cricket charges $10 a month for tethering, though Mint SIM doesn't offer it at all.

Alternative carriers (MVNOS)

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4 days ago

How to get Android O on your Pixel or Nexus (and how to roll back to Nougat)

9

Here's how to get the Android O Developer Preview on your Nexus or Pixel device.

The Android O Developer Preview is here, and if you're one such developer (or just a person who doesn't listen to good advice!) here's how to install it onto your phone or tablet.

Which devices support the Android O Developer Preview?

The preview is supported on the following phones and tablets:

  • Pixel
  • Pixel XL
  • Pixel C
  • Nexus 6P
  • Nexus 5X
  • Nexus Player

What you need to know beforehand

The Android O Developer Preview is being released only as a factory image, which means you can't just go to Android's beta page and get the update as an over-the-air release. This is because O, in its current form, is very early, and isn't intended to be installed by the general population — just by developers.

In order to update a phone or tablet to Android O, you need to first unlock your bootloader.

Before we go into these steps, it is strongly recommended that you have previous knowledge of working with the Android SDK (software development kit) and Terminal (OS X or Linux) or Command Prompt (Windows), as it is possible to harm your device if something were to go wrong in the following process.

You'll need to download an updated Android SDK that has the latest Android O tools and images, and you can grab it from the Android Development website and follow their instructions on how to install it correctly. For the following process all you will need is the adb and fastboot files which are located in the Platform Tools folder.

Additionally, all the following commands are written as they would be in Terminal on a Linux or OS X platform. If you are following this guide and using a Windows machine, you will not need to use the "./" seen in the guide.

Enable developer settings and USB debugging

Before you begin, you'll need to have a compatible Nexus or Pixel device running Android 7.x Nougat.

  1. Go to your Settings and scroll down to About Phone/Tablet
  2. Tap on the Build number seven times until the dialog box says you are now a developer
  3. Go back to the Settings menu and you should find a new option called Developer options. Click into the Developer options
  4. Make sure that the developer options are turned on and that USB debugging is checked on
  5. Make sure Enable OEM unlock is checked.
  6. Plug your device into your computer and click "OK" on the dialog box asking you to Allow USB debugging while connected to the computer. You can also select to always allow access on that computer

If done correctly, this will be everything you will need to do on your phone or tablet for the moment.

Unlocking your bootloader

Nexus devices and Pixel phones bought from Google directly have a bootloader you can unlock. If you want to manually flash software, you'll need to do this.

To do this you must first boot into your bootloader. You can either manually turn off your phone or tablet and hold down the power button and the volume down button to enter your device's Bootloader Menu or you can enter the following commands into your terminal or command prompt.

Run the following command to make sure your device is properly connected to your computer. If it returns a string of characters it means that you are all set to start updating your device.

./adb devices

Now to enter into the Bootloader menu just run the following command.

./adb reboot bootloader

At the bottom of the screen there will be several things listed including the lock state of the device. This should say locked unless you have unlocked your bootloader in the past and never went back and locked it again.

To unlock your bootloader, which is required only when flashing a stock firmware image (not sideloading and update, which we'll get to soon), you must enter the following commands. Remember that when unlocking your Nexus' bootloader it will factory reset your device, so you will lose everything stored on it. If you have not yet backed up anything important on your device you can hit the power button while Start is highlighted in the Bootloader menu and this will boot you back into your device like normal. Now back to unlocking your bootloader.

Use the command:

./fastboot flashing unlock

A dialog will appear on the device asking if you are sure about unlocking. Again this will factory reset your device, so if you want to back out of the process you just need to select no with the power button. If you are ready to unlock your bootloader you press the volume up button and then the power button to confirm that you wish to unlock your bootloader.

./fastboot reboot-bootloader

It is recommended to reboot the bootloader just to give itself a check to make sure everything is working correctly before moving onto the next step.

Flashing the stock firmware image

Now that your bootloader is unlocked, it's time to flash the Android O image. To find the system images, head on over to the Factory Images page, find your device, and download the latest factory image available. It is easiest to then uncompress the file in the Platform Tools folder where the adb and fastboot files are so that you don't have to type the path to the different files when flashing the firmware. (Or if you know that you can drag a file into a terminal window to copy the path, just do that.)

To begin, make sure you are still in the bootloader menu on your device and double check that your bootloader is in fact unlocked.

First, make sure that your computer is communicating correctly with your phone or tablet. As long as your device's serial number comes back as a connected device you are ready to begin updating your device.

./fastboot devices

Now it is time to flash the updated bootloader with the following command.

./fastboot flash bootloader [bootloader file].img

You will not see anything on the screen of your device but there should be a dialog in your terminal or command prompt. When it is done flashing the bootloader you should reboot back into the bootloader as to make sure everything is still working correctly.

./fastboot reboot-bootloader

Next you flash the updated radios. This step is only necessary if you are updating the firmware of a phone or tablet that has cellular radios built into it.

./fastboot flash radio [radio file].img

./fastboot reboot-bootloader

Finally, it's time to flash the actual system image to your phone or tablet.

Warning: The following line of code will wipe your device. If you do **not* want your device to be wiped, remove the "-w" from the command. The update should still take just fine, and it will not wipe your user data.

./fastboot -w update [image file].zip

When this is done, your phone will restart itself and boot up normally. As this process clears all data from your device, it will take slightly longer for your device to boot up into Android O for the first time. Once you have been greeted with the device setup walkthrough process, you know you have successfully flashed a new version of the firmware.

If you do not want to enter the commands manually there are scripts included inside the compressed folder containing the system image that will do most but not all of the heavy lifting for you. The flash-all script files will automate the flashing of the bootloader, radios (if needed), and the system image. The problem with this process is that you must first make sure that your phone is in the bootloader menu and its bootloader must be unlocked before starting the script. Of course if these are not already done the script will fail to run and nothing will happen.

How to revert back to Nougat from the Android O Developer Preview

So you ignored our advice (or you're a developer who needs his or her phone or tablet back) and need to re-install Nougat. That's pretty easy! All you need to do is find the right system image compatible with your handset or slate and run the same procedures as above but with the Android Nougat image.

When finding your Nougat image, make sure you are downloading the correct one that corresponds with your device. If you're running a Verizon or Rogers Pixel, for instance, you'll have to make sure you download the right one.

Problems? Confused?

If you're having issues or want to ask a question, come join us in our forums for all the tips, tricks and advice you can handle!

Android O

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4 days ago

Android O isn't available in the Android Beta Program yet, will likely join in mid-May

3

Everyone with a Pixel or modern Nexus will get their opportunity to use Android O soon.

With Android O entering Developer Preview status, this is our first opportunity to download and run a preview version of the latest OS. Unfortunately for those who became accustomed to simply enrolling in the Android Beta Program and getting builds over-the-air, this first Developer Preview of Android O isn't available in the Beta Program.

If you want Android O right now, your only way to get it will be through manually flashing an image of the Developer Preview.

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