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3 years ago

MIUI port now available for the Nook Color

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MIUI, a popular third-party ROM for Android devices, is now available as a stable version for the B&N Nook Color.  It's worth noting that this is not part of the official MIUI project, but a faithful port from the folks at MIUI.us -- like many of the English language releases.  It's built from the latest 1.7.8 release (July 6), which has a page full of bugfixes and optimizations, so you're getting the very latest version for your eReader turned awesome Android tablet.

As of right now, there looks to be an issue mounting the internal storage (the developers have acknowledged and will fix in the next release) and you'll need to download something like softkeys or button savior to have access to the standard Android buttons.  The next release will bundle button savior to save you that step.  Other than that, the feedback looks very positive.  You can find the download links and more information at the source link below.

Source: MIUI.us. Thanks, Thoth19!

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3 years ago

Twitter seems to extend olive branch to its 750,000 devs amid reports of FTC probe

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Twitter, which in the past has been accused to treating third-party developers as second-class citizens by basically borrowing their functionality before telling them they're not longer needed, has just announced that there are more than 1 million registered Twitter applications from 750,000 developers.

Also Monday, Twitter, which reportedly is under investigation by the Federal Trade Commission for the way it treats third-party developers, announced a new version of the Twitter Developer Site, which includes discussions, a developer blog, better documentation, improved apps management and an enhanced search engine.

Surely these things are unrelated.

Sources: Twitter Developers, Business Insider

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3 years ago

Android Quick App: Wiz Kid Jr.

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The video up there says it all. Wiz Kid Jr. is a fast-paced, puzzle-based game that challenges not only your finger dexterity but also your forethought and ability to adapt on-the-fly.

The idea is classic: anything of the same color can be destroyed or removed if there's three or more of them together. In this case, they're totems, and they give you mana. The mana doesn't give you any cool powers (for that, there's magic bolts), but it does keep your game going. Mana is like your essence, your life-blood, and without it, the baddies win.

Getting rid of totems (or the undesirables) is easy. Draw a connecting line between them, and poof, they disappear. Unfortunately, diagonal lines are a no-no, but you can still string together some pretty impressive combos if you snake to-and-fro and make sure you start the line at the optimal location. If you can't, you can still totally just go for groups of three or four (I totally did) to get your mana up little by little.

The bad guys are evil spirits, but I still think they're evil faces, and for some reason, they like munching on your mana. There's six different kinds, but you don't face them all unless you're playing on the Unstoppable Wizard difficulty. For beginner wizard, you face the first three that are unlocked, and as you unlock the more difficult levels, a new evil spirit is unlocked as well.

You're able to have six levels of mana saved up, noted by the change in your mana bar's color and the amount of vials sitting above it. You can save up more mana after you've already filled six vials, but I'm not sure by how much, because at that point, evil spirits were munching my mana so quickly I couldn't fill it up fast enough. At any rate, just know you can save up a big war chest in case the waves start coming too quickly.

Something also worth saving up (especially for the later levels), are your magic bolts. Magic bolts fuel some special abilities you unlock that can greatly expedite the removal of evil faces. You start off with the hammer at the beginner level, and it does just that: hammers away a totem or spirit. There's a small cooldown between using magic bolt-infused abilities, so you can't just blow half your hammers back-to-back when the going gets rough. As you unlock more abilities (also in conjunction with more difficult levels and more spirits), you'll have more options at your disposal, but to keep them scaled with their increased power, their cost goes up. I know the bomb costs two bolts (compared to the hammer's one), and I can only assume the next two will cost three and four (or more!).

There's also a Super Free Play mode, which lets you pick the wave speed, spirit anger, and any three spirits to duke it out with. It's fun to have and definitely lets you work out strategies against some of the spirits that may be causing you trouble.

Overall, Wiz Kid Jr. is a stellar game. Graphically, it's nails. The scary, training wizard man up top looks great, as do all the stylized fonts and accents. It runs smooth as butter, and has a kickin' soundtrack, to boot. If you like puzzle games (or anything that'll surely challenge you), Wiz Kid Jr. is a safe bet. There's a free version that's limited to 10 waves and a paid version, that for a mere 99 cents, nets you the whole game. If you like what you see, find yourself four quarters and pony up the dough. There's ghosts evil spirits to be busted.

More pictures and download links are after the break.

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3 years ago

Apps getting option to zoom in to fill larger Honeycomb tablet screens

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Here's an interesting addition coming to a future version of Android. Apps that don't properly scale up to Honeycomb tablets' greater resolution and larger screen sizes will be able to be zoomed in on to properly fill the screen. This is different than stretching the app to fill the screen, which is what happens now if the app doesn't properly target Android 3.x.

Instead, if you tell the app to "Zoom to fill screen," the app will be emulated at approximately HVGA resolution (that's 320x480) and then scaled up. The down side is that things will look pretty pixelated, but usability shouldn't be affected.

You won't see this on every app you run on Honeycomb -- many apps were designed to scale up on their own just fine, thank you very much, and so developers can remove the stretch/zoom option if they so choose.

And since we know you'll ask, Google's not yet saying what the next version of Honeycomb will be, though we've seen evidence that it could be Android 3.2.

Source: Google

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3 years ago

HTC Status available on AT&T starting July 17, presales today

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AT&T's just dropped word that the HTC Status (its version of the HTC ChaCha) will be available in stores starting July 17 for a mere $49.99 on contract. That price is just about right, we gather, as it's obviously fighting for the Facebook crowd. (Maybe the dedicated Facebook button gave that away?) Presales begin today, and Best Buy will have an exclusive mauve version available.

Other specs of note:

  • Platform: Android 2.3 + HTC Sense
  • Display: 2.6-inch touch screen with 480 x 320 resolution
  • Network: Quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/900/1800/1900 UMTS/HSDPA 850/1900
  • Memory: 512 MB RAM, 512 MB ROM
  • Processor: MSM7227, 800 MHz
  • Battery: Rechargeable lithium-ion battery, 1250 mAh
  • Camera resolution: 5 MP main camera with autofocus, VGA  front-facing camera

So, another week or so to go before you can snag the Status. In the meantime, be sure to check out our review of the European HTC ChaCha.

Source: AT&T

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3 years ago

Seesmic for Android hits 1 million downloads

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If you’re a Seesmic for Android user, you can now officially say you’re one of a million. The popular Twitter client has reached 1,000,000 downloads, a major milestone for any app, but especially so for one with such competition. The developers released the brief thank-you video above to acknowledge all those who made it possible. Hit the source link for Seesmic’s announcement, which features a nice shout-out to our very own Mr. Phil Nickinson.

Source: Seesmic
More: Your favorite Android Twitter clients

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3 years ago

Students in RIM's hometown declare war against Android

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Our RIM-o-riffic pals from CrackBerry are up in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, this week to attend Research in Motion's annual shareholder's conference and assure themselves that things can, in fact, get better. Hope they're having fun with that.

Meanwhile, a sect of students from the University of Waterloo (go Warriors!) and Wilfrid Laurier University (go Golden Hawks!) apparently have declared war on Android, via FightAndroid.org. The idea is to take down Android from the inside.

It's WAR! RIM and Waterloo are under attack by Android. You can counterattack. Help build an ad directory that will destroy the Google ad model, which funds Android.

Let us know how that works out.

They're also holding rallies today and Tuesday "to galvanize Waterloo as a community to fight Android." No word yet if CrackBerry Kevin will be there, pitchfork in hand. (Or if he'll be the only one.)

The Dow Jones Industrials index was down 144 points in early trading Monday. Google was down 0.43 percent at 529.72 a share. RIM was down 2.24 percent at 28.33 a share. We'll check back next year and see how the campaign's going.

More: FightAndroid.org

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3 years ago

Samsung Galaxy S II goes through the ritual teardown process

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If it can be built, then it must be torn down to see how things work. Samsung started fresh with the Samsung Galaxy S II phone and many folks have been wondering what, exactly makes the device tick. Luckily for us, iFixit has done all the dirty work that we're too weak to do and as such, have taken the device apart -- right down to it's freshly pressed Samsung Exynos 4210 dual-core application processor. Although it's not a full repair guide as of yet, if you're looking to get a closer look at how the Samsung Galaxy S II is put together -- hit the source link below.

Source: iFixit

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3 years ago

Philadelphia newspapers will soon offer discounted tablets with digital subscriptions

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These days, the newspaper industry is having a tough time figuring out just how to battle technology and the resources it offers individuals for getting their news. Some smaller newspapers have simply shut down shop while others have fought back by embracing it.

The Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, which are both owned by the Philadelphia Media Network, are embracing it. While the finer details have yet to be worked out, like pricing and what tablet -- both will soon be offering up discounted Android tablets loaded with digital subscriptions to the content. If you can't beat em, might as well join them.

Source: Liliputing; Thanks, Brad!

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3 years ago

Android 101: How to add and remove widgets

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