Headlines

3 years ago

Poll: Would you buy a Nexus S this far into the year?

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Asked this on Twitter earlier today, and let's put it to you folks: We're more than halfway through the year, and chances are we'll see a new Nexus device -- whatever it may be -- by the end of the year, if Google keeps up with previous schedules. (Though we have no assurances that it will.)

So the question is this: With the possibility of a new Nexus device in the next five or six months, are you willing to shell out for a Samsung Nexus S? It's a mere $99 on contract, but $529 outright.

Is now a good time to buy a Nexus S?

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3 years ago

Android 101: How to properly replace your battery

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3 years ago

Escape from Robot Factory is enough to make a robot's head spin

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

This one's at least a wee bit interesting. You're a robot, trying to get out of the robot factory (as all robots are inclined to do, we gather). It's a three-dimensional scroller, but you don't see things from the robot's point of view, which gets a little confusing at times. And the controls are rudimentary at best. But the good news is there's a free version if you wanna check things out. Links are after the break.

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3 years ago

Gingerbread leaked for the T-Mobile G2; same build as the version mistakenly released last month

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Remember the snafu last month where T-Mobile was shipping out warranty-replacement G2s running Gingerbread? Well, some crafty tinkerers have extracted the build and made it available for all to download. This 2.3 update is the same exact version as the one T-Mobile mistakenly shipped out, so though it isn't "official," rest assured that it is the build that big T is working with. No, you don't need root, but yes, there are some bugs that still need squashing, so as always, download at your own risk. Hit the source link to grab the update from T-Mobile's support community.

Source: T-Mobile Support Community

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3 years ago

BlackBerry PlayBook has a newer version of Android than 81% of you

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Our pals at CrackBerry are in the midst of testing a recently leaked version of the Android Player app for the PlayBook tablet. And guess what: It's running a newer version of Android than some 80 percent of you guys out there. When last we looked, some 18.6 percent of Android devices were running Android 2.3.x. (Honeycomb devices made up less than 1 percent on top of that.)

And RIM's BlackBerry PlayBook? Why, it's running Android 2.3.3, while some 59 percent of you out there are still officially stuck on Froyo, and another 18 percent are on Eclair.

Food for thought.

Source: CrackBerry, @bla1ze

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3 years ago

Raspberry Pink Samsung Replenish available from Sprint beginning July 24

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Sprint's eco-friendly Samsung Replenish will available in a "Raspberry Pink" flavor beginning this Sunday, July 24. The mid-level device, which we first met back in April, sports a full portrait QWERTY keyboard and is made of 80 percent recycled materials. The Replenish is also available in Onyx Black and Arctic Blue colors. This raspberry can be picked at Best Buy, Radio Shack, or any Sprint retail channel for a cool $50 with a two-year contract.

Source: Sprint

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3 years ago

HTC EVO 3D Video Dock available August 21st

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We let you know last month that the HTC EVO 3D dock was available for pre-order via Best Buy, but there was no official word on when exactly you'd be able to have it. We're hearing now that August 21 is the day you've been waiting for (assuming you're planning on picking one up) as the official "Video Dock" can be yours for $50 if you wish.  While you're at it you can grab the new Holster and Shield Combo for $25 that same day. And if you're itching to accessorize and don't want to wait a whole month, you can pick up some sweet phone covers from Sprint for $20 starting July 24.

Source: Sprintfeed

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3 years ago

Try on jeans, get a 'free' phone

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We're going to suspend disbelief here for a moment and imagine that some of you have girlfriends, and that these girlfriends on occasion shop at a store called Wet Seal, which apparently sells "cute teen clothing." (Note to self: Don't ever let your daughters grow up.)

Anyhoo, they might soon be asking about a promotion in which they can get a free Android smartphone for trying on a pair of jeans (and they'll likely be wondering where you're hiding the camera).

Here's the deal: Yeah, they (or you) can get a "free" phone in exchange for trying on jeans. It's free insofar as you still have to sign up for a two-year voice/data plan. So if that's a good deal for you, then go for it. But remember, free ain't quite "free."

Sources: Wet Seal, press release

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3 years ago

Travelocity launches Android app

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Travel giant Travelocity has launched its Android app. You've got options to book flights and hotels, find deals, get flight info, explore destinations, find gas stations, view your trips (once you're logged in to your account, of course), contact Travelocity, or go to the full website.

The app itself is pretty simple -- what you see above amounts to the entirety of the menu, and there are no real settings to take advantage of. You can search for flights or hotels without being logged in, which is nice, and the "Contact us" button brings up Travelocity's toll-free number.

We've got download links after the break if you want to give it a go.

Source: Press release

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3 years ago

Editorial: Netflix's Android rollout an example of a good thing done badly

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One of the first rules of kindergarten is you don't talk about kindergarten. Wait. That's something else. Actually, one of the first rules of kindergarten involves bringing treats to school. If you don't have enough for everybody, don't bring anything.

The same should apply for some Android applications. In particular, we're talking about the Netflix application. Here's a look at how it's rolled out:

So we now have 24 devices that "officially" can run Netflix. And of those 24 devices, only one is a Honeycomb tablet -- and it's one that maybe all of a dozen people have purchased. That's the Lenovo IdeaPad Tablet K1, which only went on sale July 20. No Motorola Xoom. Not Galaxy Tab 10.1. No ASUS eee Pad Transformer. No Acer Iconia Tab A500.

That's no way to run a railroad. It's not good for Netflix, and it's sure not good for Android. The list of smartphones that Netflix is now (finally) available on is pretty good, with most of the high-end devices available in the United States. But the form factor that screams for Netflix -- that'd be tablets -- is still severely lacking.

We know the Netflix app works well on tablets. Hell, it looks great on Honeycomb tablets. The latest version released this week works just fine, no hacking of the app needed.

And if you'll allow a short rant here, we've never been that comfortable with people hacking open the Netflix app to get it to work on other devices. Changing the build.prop file on your own phone to spoof a device ID is one thing; breaking open someone's app and rebuilding it to suit your needs (and then distributing it) is another. It's practices like this that cause the DRM punishment in the first place. And as we all know, it never really punishes the offenders, who just find another way around the DRM.

Netflix has to satisfy the movie studios' requirements to make sure there's not wholesale pirating of movies. We get that. It sucks, but we get it. But look where it's led us -- a half-assed rollout of what should be one of the most exciting applications to hit a Honeycomb tablet, and one that could have made Google's movie rental service all but irrelevant before it even launched.

Instead, we have a great app that finally works on some devices and a scant few tablets. It's nice that we've got it now, but it's pretty much been an exercise in how not to launch a popular app.

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