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2 years ago

Android App Review: Real64

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YouTube link for mobile viewing

To be fair, I know this looks like a direct copy of strikingly similar to N64oid. However, N64oid isn't on the Android Market and Real64 is, so that's why I'm taking a look at it.

As far as emulators go, Real64 works fine. Most games seem to run, although the level of problems with any particular ROM seems to vary. In my experience (and as evidenced in the video), Pokemon Stadium starts with some totally distorted graphics, but plays fine. Pokemon Stadium 2 loads fine but freezes before you can get into a match. The Legend of Zelda and Super Smash Bros. ran fairly flawlessly, so it's hard to say.

There's a fairly full settings menu, with options to adjust the kind of digital control scheme you're using (d-pad or joystick) as well as map out custom settings. I didn't have any Wii controllers on hand to test out if that works via Bluetooth, but I'm led to believe it does.

If you're looking to play N64 games on your Android device, Real64 seems to get the job (mostly) done. It's far from perfect but the fact it runs N64 games is something. As for its seeming relation to N64oid, I can't speak to that. At any rate, Real64 runs $4.99 in the Android Market.

Update: And it looks like it didn't take long for Real64 to get pulled, either. If you're still looking for an N64 emulator, there'll be links for N64oid after the break.

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2 years ago

Release the Droid Bionic dummy phones!

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So it's got that going for it, which is nice. Is it Sept. 8 yet?

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2 years ago

Dual-booting TouchPad flirts with Android, reaches second base

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

Here's a new video from the folks hard at work attempting to get a usable port of Android onto the dying HP TouchPad, and more progress has been made. The touchscreen still doesn't work, which is kind of a big deal (but one they're working on), but what's new now is a bit of command-line accessible dual-boot action with Android 2.3.5. Again, not much your average weekend flasher can take advantage of -- this is still very, very pre-alpha. But the progress is exciting, and is starting to make a believer out of more of us.

Source: Team-Touchdroid; via Rootzwiki
Previous: CyanogenMod 7 seeing booting into a TouchPad

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2 years ago

Android accessory review: BodyGuardz Armor Carbon Fiber for the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

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I'm a firm supporter of the opinion that most electronic devices are better naked than protected by a case. Yes, I've heard all the advice otherwise, and yes, I know that nothing is completely scratch proof. Heck, just last week I shattered my Thunderbolt when I absentmindedly perched it on my sink, turning it into a poster child for the dangers of case-less smartphones. That said, few things can change my mind. I'd rather commit to being more careful than hiding my expensive new device under a cheap looking cover.

Will the BodyGuardz Armor Carbon Fiber for my Galaxy Tab 10.1 convert my way of thinking? Let's find out, after the break.

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2 years ago

Samsung has no plans to release products here that it hasn't yet announced it plans to release here

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Stories are floating around this morning lamenting Samsung having "no plans" to release the Galaxy Tab 7.7 and Galaxy Note in the United States. Apparently we need to refresh how this works.

At European shows like IFA and Mobile World Congress, you get product announcements from the likes of Samsung, Sony Ericsson, Acer, ASUS, etc. You get some hands-on time, then we return to the U.S. and hope that one day you'll see the devices here. When the original Galaxy Tab 7 was announced at IFA in August 2010, it was done so without any specific U.S. availability (just "in coming months." Same goes for the Galaxy S II and original Galaxy Tab 10.1 at MWC 2011.

That's par for the course for these European events. Products are announced. Any U.S. availability announcements generally come later, more often than not from the U.S. carriers, which will actually sell the devices. (In the case of the original 7-inch Galaxy Tab, word came just a couple weeks later, but don't use that as a benchmark.) The U.S.-based shows are usually a little different -- you'll generally get vague timetables for American release, which are very much subject to change. (Hello, Droid Bionic.)

This is PR 101. It ain't official until it's official. So when Samsung says it has "no plans" for these latest releases, it doesn't mean you'll never see the Galaxy Note or Galaxy Tab 7.7 here in the states. It just means it currently has no plans. Or, more accurately, it hasn't announced any plans. That's all.

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2 years ago

Droid Bionic already rooted

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Good news for those of you worried about being able to root the Motorola Droid Bionic -- it's already been done. The cats at My Droid World have adapted to the Droid 3 root method to the DB, and as you can see from the image above (the # symbol is the telltale), it's a go. We'll still need some proper on-device work, but it's certainly on the way. Bottom line: Root access has been achieved.

Source: My Droid World; via Android Central Forums

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2 years ago

Android Game Review: The Moron Test

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If you're thick-skinned and in the mood for some fast-paced, attention-demanding challenges, the Moron Test is for you.

The Moron Test is broken up into a series of sections filled with puzzles and tasks, and after you've completed one, you can move onto the next in line. It'll take a bit of time, though, because the game is unforgiving, and a mistake either starts you completely over or returns you to a checkpoint.

It all starts of simple enough, having you press buttons of the correct color or touch a duck, and once you've done enough of these correctly, the game tells you that now it knows you "have a pulse." That vibe permeates the game; it is the moron test, after all, so from your first puzzle, the game assumes you're a moron. You can only change its mind by beating its silly tests.

Despite the Moron Test's seemingly rudimentary nature, it actually does well in forcing you to think outside of the box (sometimes). Cracking the eggs from largest to smallest is straightforward, but what happens when you're told to press the green button, but the button is orange? If you waited for the button to turn green and then pressed it, you'd advance.

Overall, The Moron Test is good to kill some time (how much is up to you), especially if you're aiming to beat all five of its sections. It runs 99 cents in the Android Market, but if you're looking to start small, the developers have some of the sections in the Market by themselves, and all for free.

Download links and more pictures are after the break.

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2 years ago

Android Central Podcast Ep. 69

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Audio-only stream below

We've got more new hardware than you can shake a stick at. In fact, we shook a stick at it, and out popped more new hardware. Join us as we talk the U.S. Galaxy S II phones, what's coming out of IFA, the latest Nexus rumors, and that creepy Droid Bionic bust we got in the mail.

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2 years ago

Samsung says it's not looking to acquire webOS

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Sitting up nights worried that Samsung might hop on the webOS bandwagon and ditch Android? There's about as much chance of that happening as there is of people properly capitalizing webOS. Samsung Electronics Co. CEO Choi Gee Sung apparently said as much this week at IFA, telling reporters "It’s not right that acquiring an operating system is becoming a fashion." The Korean manufacturer had been named as a possible licensee of webOS since late June -- long before HP officially started the knife downward.

Works for us. Samsung already makes some fine Android and Windows Phone devices, and it's got its own Bada operating system, too (which graphically looks more and more like Android every day. We really do hate to see webOS continue its downward spiral, but we're also not inclined to argue against natural selection.

Source: Bloomberg; via PreCentral

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2 years ago

Samsung Galaxy S II LTE passes through the FCC

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Nothing sexier than a nice wireframe at week's end, we suppose. And that brings us to the Samsung SGH-i727, which has made its way through the U.S. FCC. The 850/1900 MHz bands lend credence to this possibly being an AT&T device at some point, but the i727 also is the same designation as Rogers' Samsung Galaxy S II LTE device. It's also got two bands of LTE -- 700MHz and 1700MHz, the latter being the AWS frequency that T-Mobile currently uses and that AT&T was planning on using once it merges. (The recently-announced and very overpriced HTC Jetstream Honeycomb tablet also rocks 700/AWS for LTE, for what that's worth.)

Anyhoo, don't look for this one just yet -- we're not expecting LTE smartphones on AT&T for several months, at least. But it's never too early to start wishing.

Source: FCC; via Engadget

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