Headlines

2 years ago

HTC One X shows us why developers need to lose the menu button

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By now you've read and watched our HTC One X review, and know all about HTC's decision to use capacitive buttons instead of on-screen buttons. As a fan of "real" buttons, I'm glad to see it, though many aren't. That's neither here nor there. The decision was made, and HTC has delivered what may be its best smartphone to date with three capacitive buttons.

And some applications are a mess on it.

The Android development team has already chimed in and said that developers need to abandon the legacy menu button in favor of new controls on the action bar. Some have done so, but as you can see in the image above, some have not. The three-dot menu symbol just hanging there all by its lonesome just looks bad, but is needed because the Facebook app hasn't been updated to use buttons and controls in the action bar. When the Galaxy Nexus came out and used on-screen buttons, this wasn't that big of a deal. Other than the three dots being in a different place on different apps (as mentioned, some have been updated and use the action bar), it didn't disrupt the way apps looked on the screen too awful much. HTC's use of capacitive buttons changes that, and not in a good way. On the other hand, developers aren't giving HTC much of a choice.

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2 years ago

HTC One X (Tegra 3) benchmarks

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Benchmarks for the international GSM version of the HTC One X with the Tegra 3 processor.

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2 years ago

Sprint Optimus S gets a second chance at a Gingerbread update

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Last September, Sprint began rolling out the Gingerbread update for the LG Optimus S. It was quickly pulled as users were experiencing bugs with the data connection, charging, the keyboard, and worse. Since then, we've been waiting for it's return. Today seems to be that day, as Sprint says the update will begin rolling out Wednesday April 4 for Optimus S devices. Besides Gingerbread and all it's improvements, the following issues were addressed this time around:

  • Device not charging
  • SD card unmounting error
  • Device not recognized by Windows SP, Vista, or 7 operating systems
  • Predictive text with Android keyboard issue
  • Voice call volume issue

If you've been waiting for Gingerbread on your Optimus S, now would be a good time to get ready. If you didn't want to wait and have been following the incredible developers for the Optimus from the Android Central forums, you're golden. Don't attempt to flash any update you may be notified of. Your developers will take good care of you, and chances are you won't have to wait six months for it.

Source: Sprint

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2 years ago

Motorola brings a huge update to the MotoACTV and releasing an application for handsets

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If you own a Motorola MotoACTV and have been wishing that you could pair it to your phone to receive notifications and more, your time has come. Motorola is releasing a large update for the MotoACTV in addition to releasing an application for devices running 2.1 and above. The update and application are due to hit at some point today, and will bring tons of features including 

  • Plan workouts on your phone, launch them from your MOTOACTV and see your workout data back on your phone
  • Track progress of your personal fitness goals on your phone
  • Use your Android smartphone to set up Wi-Fi networks for your MOTOACTV

And you still get the same great Bluetooth® enabled functionality between your MOTOACTV and Android smartphone such as:

  • Receive notifications of incoming calls and answer calls
  • Redial calls from the MOTOACTV notifications list
  • Receive text messages
  • Receive reminders about events from your Android smartphone calendar
  • Sync fitness data from your MOTOACTV to MOTOACTV.com

Be sure to check out the update, and hit the break for download links for the MotoACTV application.

Source: Motorola; Thanks, Chris!

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2 years ago

Sony acknowledges heat-related display issue on some Xperia S phones

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Sony Mobile says it's confirmed an issue with some Xperia S phones that result in the display showing a yellowish hue at increased temperatures, following reports from disgruntled Xperia S users over the past month. In a statement, the manufacturer said it'd "identified that the display on a limited number of Xperia S smartphones may show a slight yellow tint if exposed to temperatures above 40 degrees Celsius."

Sony says Xperia S owners with affected hardware should contact customer support to have the issue remedied "at no cost", which we presume involves Sony replacing faulty devices.

Along with its 12MP camera, the Xperia S's 1280x720 "Reality Display"-branded screen is one of its most noteworthy features. Any hardware defect in a flagship product is sure to be a source of embarrassment, but it's good to see Sony actively addressing this problem and replacing affected handsets. (Especially since they're required to by law in the UK and EU.)

We didn't notice any heat-related problems with the phone when reviewed it, but if you have, be sure to shout out in the comments.

Source: Crave

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2 years ago

Verizon HTC Rezound price slashed to $49

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We might be focusing on a couple of other HTC phones this week, but if you don't mind settling for a device that's a few months old you could take home another high-end HTC for next to nothing, starting today. The Verizon HTC Rezound, which launched last year at an eye-watering $299 on-contract, has just had its price slashed to $49 with a two-year plan.

The Rezound is notable for its 720p display, Beats Audio support and dual-core processor. As you'd expect from a leading Verizon phone, there's 4G LTE connectivity included too. We reviewed  the Rezound last year, and found it to be a worth competitor to Samsung's Galaxy Nexus. And with an update to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich imminent, the Rezound offers good value at this price point.

Source: Verizon Wireless; via: Droid-Life

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2 years ago

HTC One series comparison

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HTC showed off their new One Series this week at Mobile World Congress, and more than a few people seemed to get excited at the upcoming handsets from the long-time Android OEM. We don't blame you at all, they are some nice looking phones. HTC seems to be focusing on a premium experience with both the manufacturing and the software, and from what we've seen, it shows.

We all know that the HTC One X is the high end, followed closely by the HTC One S, and finally the HTC One V brings up the budget, but still very nice, offering. But we decided a nice side-by-side look at all the specifications for each was in order. So take your time and have a look, then discuss. There is no wrong choice here, and that's a good thing.

HTC One X forums | HTC One S forums | HTC One V forums

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2 years ago

Sense 4 screenshot gallery

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A ridiculously large number of screen shots from Sense 4. Be sure to read our complete Sense 4 walkthrough.

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2 years ago

Contest Winners: ShopAndroid Daily winners and Cruzerlite Androidified cases for the Galaxy Note!

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If you're a registered member here at Android Central then you know our forums always have a contest happening. And if you're not registered, well -- now is as good a time as any. This week's winners are as posted after the break, and if you were chosen watch your email as we'll be following up during the week. Stay tuned for more upcoming contests folks. Congrats to the winners!

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2 years ago

How to cut down a SIM card for the HTC One X (and any other phone)

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This one's important for those of you looking to switch to the HTC One X (as well as a number of upcoming phones). You're going to need a micro-SIM, which as the name suggests is smaller than a larger (and more prevalent today) mini-SIM card. If you're rocking a GSM phone right this second, there's a good change you're using a mini-SIM. If you've got an iPhone 4/4S on AT&T, you've already got a micro-SIM. 

So, a couple of ways to go about getting a micro-SIM. One is to just ask. Head to AT&T or T-Mobile or whomever your carrier happens to be, and tell 'em you need a micro-SIM. (If they don't know what one is, it might be time to consider switching carriers. :p )

The other way is to cut your own. Sounds scary. Sounds dangerous. 

It is neither. 

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2 years ago

Samsung throws in free extended battery if you buy the Galaxy Nexus from it

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Just a quick heads up that if you buy the Verizon Galaxy Nexus directly from Samsung, ol' Sammy's gonna throw in a free 2100 mAh extended battery and battery door. That's with a two-year contract, of course, and the phone itself costs $299. Use the link below if you're in the market.

More: Samsung Direct

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2 years ago

Rogers LTE network now live in Calgary and Halifax

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Over the past few months, Rogers has been rapidly deploying LTE throughout Canada and today, they've gone ahead and announced two new regions that are LTE enabled. The cities of Halifax and Calgary are the latest additions to Rogers LTE offerings.

“We’re thrilled to offer our LTE network to even more Canadians in the east and the west,” said John Boynton, Rogers Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer. “Now, Calgarians and Haligonians can enjoy the benefits of speeds on their mobile devices comparable to what they would get at home. And, they can do it on an LTE network that is Canada’s fastest and largest for a robust and reliable experience.”

Given that I personally live in Halifax, I find this to be great news but even better then the addition of LTE is the fact that Rogers will also soon be adding the HTC One X to their device lineup. This will of course build on their already existing LTE device offerings such as the HTC Raider, Samsung Galaxy S II LTE and the Samsung Galaxy Note. You can check out the full press release past the break.

Source: Rogers

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2 years ago

HTC One X review

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Don't call it a comeback. HTC certainly was in the running for King of Mobile World Congress 2012 (an award that would be way cooler if it existed) with the new HTC One line, and the HTC One X specifically. When you stop and think about it, however, it's also a logical progression.

HTC started 2011 with the eventually disappointing Verizon ThunderBolt, which was thick, heavy and a battery hog — due in no small part to its LTE radio. The prevailing winds started to shift later in the year, however, with the likes of the Sensation and Amaze 4G, and you started to get a sense (pardon the pun) that the Taiwanese manufacturer was starting to regain its footing. (That shift was further indicated by the likes of the Windows Phone HTC Titan line.)

And that brings us to 2012 and the HTC One X, the pinnacle of the trio of Android smartphones that make up the HTC One line. (The others are the HTC One S and HTC One V.) There actually are two versions of the One X — the GSM version with a quad-core Tegra 3 processor, and another with a dual-core Qualcomm Krait processor and an LTE radio for 4G data.

The HTC One X review that follows is of the international quad-core version. We'll follow up with AT&T dual-core, LTE version of the One X when it becomes available.


A great camera, equally great display, and all the power of NVIDIA Tegra 3 that we've come to expect. Sense 4 meshes nicely with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Free 25GB of online storage thrown in via Dropbox. Impressive design and build quality. Battery life is pretty good.


That said, the non-removable battery and lack of microSD card may be a sticking point for some. The 4.7-inch phone may be too large for small hands. The protruding camera lens can be easily scratched and isn't easily replaceable.



The leader of the next-generation HTC One series of smartphones has been a breeze to use. Android 4.0 has been improved upon with HTC Sense 4 while still retaining the overall look, feel and function of Ice Cream Sandwich, which in and of itself has an excellent user experience. The camera is a high point, Beats Audio makes music sound better, and you get a bunch of online storage thrown in for free. HTC easily has a winner in the One X.

Inside this review

More info

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2 years ago

How HTC Sense 4 handles your private data - a Q&A

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Privacy is on the tip of everyone's tongues these days, whether it's news about breaches, or applications overstepping their bounds, or buggy operating system-level software that could possibly give a peek into your data. Regardless, it's more important than ever for us, the users of these devices, to at least attempt to understand how our data's being used, and how it's being protected.

HTC found itself in the midst of the privacy firestorm on several occasions in 2011. Most of that was in conjunction with the Carrier IQ analytics software, which some U.S. carriers used to track network and device usage, to the chagrin of many. HTC, responding to a congressional inquiry, said that some 6.3 million devices included Carrier IQ code. The crux of the hatred toward the likes of Carrier IQ and other analytics and tracking tools is that users never explicitly gave their permission for them to be used. Only, that's not exactly true. Every phone ships with a privacy policy. And every setup sequence asks you to agree to terms before using the device.

To that end, we've been poring over the Tell HTC (Experience Log) Privacy Statement that's included in the HTC One S. Following is a Q&A based on what we've seen.

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