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2 years ago

Super Monkey Ball 2 for Android delivers primates, transparent spheroids

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Building on its ever-growing back-catalog, SEGA has just released primate-based puzzler Super Monkey Ball 2: Sakura Edition for Android. Monkey Ball, which rolled its way onto iOS months ago, joins SEGA classics like ChuChu Rocket and Sonic CD on the Android Market Google Play from today.

So here's the deal with Super Monkey Ball -- you've got a monkey, which is sealed inside a ball. You've got to roll around eating bananas, because that's what monkeys do, and being encased within a hurtling transparent spheroid isn't going to change that. Like on iOS, controls are primarily tilt-based, as you guide your chimp of choice to the end of the stage with as many bananas as possible. Yeah, we're not exactly dispelling any monkey stereotypes here.

Super Monkey Ball 2: Sakura Edition is out now for devices running Android 2.1 and above, promising 125 levels of ape-based antics. The current price is just $0.99, which SEGA says is a special introductory offer. We've got the usual Google Play links after the break.

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2 years ago

Late-night poll: Do you use a security application?

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You might have noticed that we're going to talk a little extra about security and privacy this week here at Android Central. It's a discussion worth having. We've asked a few security and/or privacy related questions in polls past, things like lockscreen security (use it), app permissions, and Google's privacy policy, but we haven't hit this basic one just yet. Tonight, let's change that.

Do you use a security application?

One of any type -- a malware scanner, a remote lock and wipe tool, a "find my phone" tool, or even a net nanny app for the kids. If you use one, let us know!

 

Do you use a "security" app?

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2 years ago

HTC shows off the 'Micro Arc Oxidation' process used on the One S

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

HTC is mighty proud of the Micro Arc Oxidation process they use on the upcoming HTC One S. Based on what we've seen from hands-on time with the S, we think they have good reason. The process turns the aircraft-grade aluminum into something that looks and feels like ceramic, and gives the S a new sleek look that gets more than a few of us interested. They showed a bit of how it works during their Mobile World Congress presentation, and now they have given us a 98 second look at the process and some behind the scenes info. Have a look, the "awesome lightning striking the phone" is pretty cool to watch. We'll be able to see how nice the finish is ourselves soon enough, as the One S will be hitting the shelves in Europe and the U.S. this spring.

Source: Youtube

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2 years ago

ASUS EeePad Transformer TF101 bug fix update now rolling out via OTA

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The introduction of Android 4.0 on the ASUS Transformer TF101 looks like it didn't go as smoothly as what ASUS had hoped. Some folks in the Android Central forums had issues after installing the update, unstable WiFi, random reboots among other things were reported. ASUS however, is now rolling out a new update for the device labeled 9.2.1.17-20123012 and while the verdict still seems to be out on what, if anything the update fixes -- it's an update.

Did your device get the update yet? If not, go ahead and check for updates. If you find it there waiting for you -- give it a go. Once your done giving it run through, drop into the forums and let us know how it's working out for you.

More: ASUS Transformer Forums; Thanks to everyone who sent this in!

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2 years ago

PlayStation Store and games now available on Sony Xperia S

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For whatever reason, Sony wasn't able to finish up PlayStation support for the Xperia S before the phone hit store shelves in Europe. Today, though, that placeholder link in the Xperia S app drawer now loads a web page where the PlayStation Store and PS Pocket app can be downloaded. The same goes for the Xperia S's Japanese counterpart, the Acro HD, which launched in late February.

To get your fill of classic 32-bit titles, you'll first need to enable non-Market applications in Settings > Applications, then run "Let's start PS store" in the app tray. Next, download the two apps, which in turn will let you buy and play games. We're seeing around a dozen titles available on our review unit, though some of those are still only playable on the Xperia Play. And it should be noted that you'll need a PlayStation Network or Sony Entertainment Network account to access Sony's mobile gaming catalog.

The manufacturer plans to bring PS certification to all its 2012 phones, including the Xperia P, U, Ion and the recently-announced Xperia Sola.

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2 years ago

Motorola MOTOACTV now officially available in Canada for $250

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Although you could have picked it up from a few online retailers previously, the Motorola  MOTOACTV has now officially been released in Canada. The Android-based fitness tracker that has seen a few large updates since it's general release will be sold at select Running Room locations across Canada as well as online at thesource.ca with a MRSP of $249.99 (8GB) including a watch strap. Looking to learn more? You can check our full review here.

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2 years ago

Radio transplant brings AT&T Galaxy Note to life on T-Mobile's '4G' HSPA+

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Since it emerged that the AT&T Galaxy Note's hardware supported T-Mobile's HSPA frequencies, there's been a cash bounty out for anyone able to bring Tmo 3G and '4G' connectivity to the device. Now it may be time for someone to collect that reward, as a method involving copying over parts of radio firmware from other devices has resulted in success.

The method, discovered by hacker 'Tomin.FHL,' requires users with rooted, SIM-unlocked AT&T Notes to download and flash specific parts of a radio file from another phone through ClockworkMod recovery. And that's pretty much it. Though obviously you'll well and truly void your warranty in the process, which means you'll be on your own if something goes wrong (like, say, bricking your phone because you flashed a hacked radio onto it).

Over on XDA​, various forum members have tried the hack with varying levels of success. The general consensus seems to be that it works, though you can expect slower HSPA data rates than you'd get on an officially-sanctioned Tmo device. If you're understand the risks, you'll find more info over at the source link.

Source: XDA; via: TechCrunch

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2 years ago

ICS on the SGS II, Rezound Pacific time [From the Forums]

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If you've been following along with the news today, then you heard the news about Google IO registrations opening up. While we spent most of the day dreaming about what we'll see there, there was plenty of other news that followed. If you're looking to get back in the loop, check out some of the previous posts or head on into the Android Central forums for more discussion:

If you're not already a member of the Android Central forums, you can register your account today.

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2 years ago

Why to use a secure lockscreen [security and privacy]

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We've talked before about how to set up your Android phone with a secure lockscreen, and today we're going to talk about why you should do it. We're all concerned about our privacy and security when it comes to our smartphones and connected devices, and the first step is to take whatever measures are available to us and put them to good use. It's not very wise to sit back and complain about the security issues if we're not willing to take any steps ourselves to keep things private. Ultimately, we as users are responsible for security and privacy on our phones. 

A rally against an application, or our carriers, for privacy concerns is all well and good. It's something we all need to concern ourselves with, and be armed with as much information as possible. But in the end, we have to make the final decisions about what we feel is secure and what isn't. A good start is to keep your private information safe in the event that you lose your phone or it gets stolen. It happens -- it's happened to me, it's likely happened to more than a few of you. You either leave your phone behind somewhere and it's gone when you go looking for it, or some unsavory type takes it upon himself to make your property disappear. A couple years back I was relieved of my laptop and briefcase containing two smartphones in a parking garage, and after the initial period of anger and shock I instantly worried about the fellow having access to my information -- not the equipment itself. Luckily, everything was password locked and I don't think any of my precious data made its way into someone else's hands. The laptop and phones were replaced, and all was well.

That scenario would have played out a good bit differently had the phones been left unprotected. Besides my personal information (which I certainly don't want anyone to have access to) I had business contacts, documents that were covered under an NDA, and other information that would have caused quite a stir if it had ended up in the wrong hands. Companies -- even and especially the one you work for -- take that sort of thing pretty damn seriously, and they should. That means you should. Whether it's some sort of trade secrets, sensitive financial data, or just information about your family, you don't want someone getting hold of it. Would you want someone horrible enough to steal your phone knowing which school your kids attend, or your Mom's address? What about your banking information, or your work email? Just because you have nothing to hide doesn't mean you shouldn't care. If you think cancelling and replacing credit cards and your drivers license is a pain when you lose your wallet, imagine what it's like trying to fix things when your Google account has been compromised. Or your PayPal account. Or even Facebook. 

Yes, it's inconvenient to have to type in a PIN or passcode every time you unlock your phone. It's also inconvenient to pay your car insurance every month. But when the time comes that you need either, you'll be glad you did.

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2 years ago

NOOK for Android - v3.1 update brings access to Barnes & Noble’s collection of comics, graphic novels and manga titles

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The latest update to NOOK for Android has bumped the app into v3.1 and aside from having the normal bug fixes and stability improvements in it, you can now also have access to Barnes & Noble’s collection of comics, graphic novels and manga titles.

With exciting graphics in stunning color that virtually jump off the page, NOOK Comics enables customers to explore favorite super heroes and characters in landscape and portrait and pinch and zoom to dive into even the tiniest details of the action. Barnes & Noble’s vast selection of NOOK Comics features the largest digital collection of Marvel’s graphic novels available through a third party, as well as titles from other leading publishers including Archie, IDW, Dynamite and Dark Horse.

The v3.1 update also includes NOOK Shop enhancements that allow folks to easily add or edit the default credit card associated to their account, as well as  un-archive content with a single tap in NOOK Library. The update is available now in the Google Play Store and you'll find the download link, past the break.

Source: Barnes & Noble

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